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I am implementing a routing protocol. For this to work, I need to know failures at the data-link layer. Are there libraries available irrespective of the underlying data-link layer protocol, which gives me hooks (like netfilter) to capture such information.

Since, this is an experiment on the protocol, I'm trying to find if there is anything that is available so that it can be implemented on the user-space rather than writing a kernel-module for the same.(Since, I'm totally new to kernel programming)

Any heads-up for the same will be really helpful.

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Do you want to capture packet drop at link layer? –  Amit Singh Tomar Feb 23 '14 at 6:57
    
@AmitSinghTomar not really. I want to be able to know if a packet is not delivered or dropped at Layer-2. In 802.11 after the re transmissions there would be a way wherein it gives this information to the upper-layers so that appropriate action is taken. I need info about such hooks/functions. Hope that helps! –  Akshay Feb 23 '14 at 22:10
    
I am not sure it will be any helpful for you but inside net/8021q/vlan_dev.c there is function which take care of packet dropped and same is read by some user space utilities. –  Amit Singh Tomar Feb 24 '14 at 7:22

1 Answer 1

Just a guess:

you can view sysfs entries ( suppose you have sysfs configured in your kernel) about your network interface, like:

cat /sys/class/net/eth0/carrier # link carrier status 1

cat /sys/class/net/eth0/operstate # should be also related, but up # forget about what it means.

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Firstly, thanks for the introducing sysfs (I never knew something like that existed..) But looking at some examples I'm not quite sure whether it will be helpful to me. As, I need information about the packet which is currently in execution at the data link layer, and failure, if any, of the same packet is to be reported so that I can give it another route before sending it to the Network layer. Hope that makes some sense! –  Akshay Feb 22 '14 at 4:21

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