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I have a div set with a background image:

<div>Play Video</div>

with the following CSS:

div {
background-image: url('icon.png');
background-image: url('icon.svg'), none;
background-size: 40px 40px;
background-repeat: no-repeat;
background-position: 90% 50%;
padding: 20px;
width: 150px;
}

The background size is respected in Firefox, Safari and Chrome. In IE8, the SVG is replaced by the PNG file. However, in IE9 and IE10, the SVG file is drastically sized down. The problem seems to be linked to the width and height of the div. If I add a height of 150px, the SVG is rendered properly. If I make it smaller (i.e. 100px) the graphic starts to shrink.

Has anyone found a way to fix this issue in Explorer? Is there a way to tell IE to use the background-size value independently of the width and height of the div?

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3 Answers 3

Be sure that your SVG has a width and height specified. If you're generating it from Illustrator, ensure that the "Responsive" box is unchecked as this option removes width and height.

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i had the same issue. so we opened the svg with an editor. also like mbxtr, illustrator generate svg´s without the width, height properties in <svg> tag. Your can recreate your SVG here –  pukoo Sep 17 at 12:41

Well, it doesn't look like there is a solution. Surprise surprise. It's IE after all. I ended up using the following code:

div {
padding: 20px;
width: 150px;
position: relative;
}

div:after {
position: absolute;
content: "";
width: 40px;
height: 40px;
top: 50%;
right: 30px;
margin-top: -20px;
background-image: url('icon.png');
background-image: url('icon.svg'), none;
}

I liked the cleaner version better, but this hack works in all modern browsers, including IE8, 9, and 10 (probably 11 but I didn't test).

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We had a similar issue with SVG background images that weren't the full site of a containing element (such as the magnifying glass at the left side of a search input).

We'd created out SVGs in Illustrator CC but running them through Peter Collingridge's SVG optimiser to take out all the unnecessary cruft did the trick. http://petercollingridge.appspot.com/svg-optimiser

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While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  Syon Aug 18 at 14:54

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