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I'm trying to debug a page which is acting a little slow in Chrome, think it might be an issue with the following javascript code:

$(document).ready(function() {
  function navScroll(distance){
    $(window).scroll(function() {
      var scrollTop;
      if(distance){
        scrollTop = distance;
      }else{
        scrollTop = 150;
      }
      if($(window).scrollTop() >= scrollTop) {
        if(!($('#mainNav').hasClass('showNav'))) {
          $('#mainNav').addClass('showNav');
        }
      } else {
        if($('#mainNav').hasClass('showNav')) {
          $('#mainNav').removeClass('showNav');
        }
      }
    });
  }

  if($('.header-image-base').length){
    var windowHeight = $(window).height();
    $('.header-image-base').css('height', windowHeight);
    navScroll(windowHeight);
  }else{
    navScroll();
  }
});

When I look in Chrome's console's 'timeline' panel, and press record, this is what I see:

enter image description here

Any ideas what is happening here? I can't find any references to this on google and no idea how to remedy it.

share|improve this question
    
it is just events log not the issue –  Nikita Holovach Feb 18 '14 at 0:26
5  
The script in the log seems to be a part of a chrome-extension( I guess this: lastpass.com ). –  Dr.Molle Feb 18 '14 at 0:32

1 Answer 1

Your page is slow most likely because you’re attaching a handler to the window scroll event — as explained below:

It’s a very, very, bad idea to attach handlers to the window scroll event. Depending upon the browser the scroll event can fire a lot and putting code in the scroll callback will slow down any attempts to scroll the page (not a good idea). Any performance degradation in the scroll handler(s) as a result will only compound the performance of scrolling overall. Instead it’s much better to use some form of a timer to check every X milliseconds OR to attach a scroll event and only run your code after a delay (or even after a given number of executions – and then a delay). (source)

Your screenshot shows that onloadwff.js is located at chrome-extension://hdokiejnpimakedhajhdlcegeplioahd which means it’s part of the LastPass extension — as seen below. So it’s probably not related to your performance issue.

screenshot

(archived screenshot)

Link - https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/lastpass-free-password-ma/hdokiejnpimakedhajhdlcegeplioahd

share|improve this answer
2  
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  summea Apr 2 '14 at 18:58
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  Ayush Apr 2 '14 at 20:16
    
@summea, added screenshot and link to archived screenshot. –  Dennis T May 6 '14 at 18:51
    
@Ayush, I believe this answers the question and I can't comment on the original post since I don't have enough reputation. –  Dennis T May 6 '14 at 18:52

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