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I use an MVC folder structure where the URL routes happen to match the directory names, eg.:

<proj>\My\Cool\Thing\ThingController.cs

Needs to be accessible by this url:

http://blahblah/My/Cool/Thing

I have the MVC routing working but unfortunately when relying on default {action} & {id}, IIS Express is routing the request to DirectoryListingModule instead, since it directly matches a folder name. Directory listing is disabled of course so instead I get:

The Web server is configured to not list the contents of this directory.
Module     DirectoryListingModule
Notification       ExecuteRequestHandler
Handler    StaticFile

To fix this I have already tried:

1. runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests = true

<system.webServer>
<modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true" >   
//Makes no difference

2. Removing module

<system.webServer>
  <modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true" >
    <remove name="DirectoryListingModule"/>   
    // Won't let me as module is locked in IIS
  </modules>
</system.webServer>

3. Removing lock & module

// applicationhost.config
<add name="DirectoryListingModule" lockItem="false" />

// web.config
<remove name="DirectoryListingModule"/>
// Causes startup error"Handler "StaticFile" has a bad module "DirectoryListingModule" in its module list"


4. Removing lock & removing/readding module (to change order) - makes no difference

// web.config
<remove name="DirectoryListingModule"/>
<add name="DirectoryListingModule"/>

Tearing my hair out. How can I get IIS to route this to my MVC app instead of DirectoryListingModue?? Preferably a solution in web.config so we don't need to reconfigure IIS in production.

(One workaround is to keep my folder structure but store it all under /Areas/... instead, just to break the match between folder path & url. This is a terrible hack & last resort.)

edit to add route mapping

I am creating custom routes relative to each controller's namespaces (namespaces always match folders). Note that everything is put under the "Modules" namespace / folder currently just to avoid the problem described above.

    private static void RegisterAllControllers(RouteCollection routes)
    {
        const string controllerSuffix = "Controller";
        const string namespacePrefix = "My.Cool.Websire.UI.Modules.";

        var controllerTypes = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetTypes().Where(x => x.IsSubclassOf(typeof(Controller))).ToList();

        foreach (var controllerType in controllerTypes)
        {
            // Turn My.Cool.Website.UI.Modules.X.Y.Z.Abc.AbcController into a route for url /X/Y/Z/Abc/{action}/{id}
            var fullNamespace = controllerType.Namespace ?? "";

            var relativeNamespace = fullNamespace.Substring(namespacePrefix.Length, fullNamespace.Length - namespacePrefix.Length);

            var controllerName =
                controllerType.Name.EndsWith(controllerSuffix)
                ? controllerType.Name.Substring(0, controllerType.Name.Length - controllerSuffix.Length)
                : controllerType.Name;

            var url = relativeNamespace.Replace(".", "/") + "/{action}/{id}";

            var routeName = "Dedicated " + controllerName + " route";

            routes.MapRoute(routeName, url, new { controller = controllerName, action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional });
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Can you add your route mapping? Also how are you publishing/packaging the site? If you publish the site correctly, the physical folder structure for the controllers (i.e. \My\Cool\Thing) shouldn't exist... –  Brent Mannering Feb 18 at 3:49
    
The folder structure is preserved for views though, right? I've posted the controller mapping. –  Brendan Hill Feb 18 at 4:49
    
Correct the folder structure for views, and any other content folders (i.e. images, scripts etc) is preserved when publishing. Another question, do you have controller names that repeat? For example X.Y.Z.Home.HomeController and A.B.C.Home.HomeController? –  Brent Mannering Feb 18 at 19:56
    
Another thought just came to me, the folder structure you mentioned, are you views and controllers contained in the same paths? i.e. /my/cool/thing/thingcontroller.cs /my/cool/thing/index.cshtml etc –  Brent Mannering Feb 18 at 20:32
    
We shouldn't have duplicated controller names in different folders.... I think this would break MVC routing which seems to be on name only. The views for a given controller will always be directly the /Views/ subfolder (barring shared / partial views etc). –  Brendan Hill Feb 19 at 2:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

My solution at this stage is to place the MVC contents of the WebUI project under a /Modules/ folder:

My.Cool.Site.WebUI/Modules/Something/Blah/BlahController
My.Cool.Site.WebUI/Modules/Something/Blah/Views/...
My.Cool.Site.WebUI/Modules/Something/Blah/PartialViews/...

Then using the route code posted I can access this via url:

http://.../Something/Blah/[action]

Because the files are under /Modules/ folder, this breaks the match between the URL and the folder path which gets around my problem.

Not a great solution but does the job.

share|improve this answer

I think if you want to separate your controllers in folders, so they are not under the "controllers", you should use "areas" feature that MVC provides. It is designed for this purpose.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion. Unfortunately our project has a much deeper structure than Areas allow (single level). We could start breaking up by project / area / folder, but this complicates our architecture unnecessarily compared to a simple folder structure. –  Brendan Hill Apr 15 at 23:57

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