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Hi all:

I want to get the autual height of the web browser,but I got some confusions about the W3C DTD HTML 4.01 and //W3C//DTC XHTML 1.0,below is my issue detail:

If I am using W3C DTD HTML 4.01 at the top of the page header and use document.body.clientHeight,then I can not get the full height of the browser:


    <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
    <html>
    <head>
    <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge" />
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
    <title>Test jQuery Height</title>

       <script type="text/javascript" src="../lib/jquery-1.8.3.min.js"></script>

       <script type="text/javascript">
         $(function(){
            var height=document.body.clientHeight;
            alert(height);
         })
       </script>
    </head>
    <body>
      <div style="margin-left:30px;">
           <button>Start Select</button>
           <button>Stop Select7lt;/button>
      </div>
     </body>
    </html>

But if I change to //W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 or use document.documentElement.clientHeight,then I could get the actual height of the browser:
1. Using //W3C//DTD HTML 4.01


    <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
    <html>
    <head>
    <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge" />
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
    <title>Test jQuery Height</title>

           <script type="text/javascript" src="../lib/jquery-1.8.3.min.js"></script>

           <script type="text/javascript">
             $(function(){
                var height=document.body.clientHeight;
            alert(height);
         })
       </script>
    </head>
    <body>
      <div style="margin-left:30px;">
           <button>Start Select</button>
           <button>Stop Select7lt;/button>
      </div>
     </body>
    </html>

  1. Using document.documentElement.clientHeight
 

    <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
    <html>
    <head>
    <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge" />
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
    <title>Test jQuery Height</title>

       <script type="text/javascript" src="../lib/jquery-1.8.3.min.js"></script>

       <script type="text/javascript">
         $(function(){
            var height=document.documentElement.clientHeight;
            alert(height);
         })
       </script>
    </head>
    <body>
      <div style="margin-left:30px;">
           <button>Start Select</button>
           <button>Stop Select7lt;/button>
      </div>
     </body>
    </html>



So,my question is What's the difference between "//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01" and "//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0"?
Any help will be grateful!

share|improve this question
    
If you can, it's a good idea to adopt HTML5—<!DOCTYPE html>. –  Chris Morgan Feb 18 at 6:55
    
The problem with retrieving your clientHeight and clientWidth, seems to be more of a browser issue. Which browser are you using? –  chris.tian Feb 18 at 7:02
    
Well,our team hope it could work fines for Chrome、Firefox、IE9+,I think there should be a common solution for it. –  lucumt Feb 18 at 9:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The difference between “//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01” and “//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0” is that the former has “HTML 4.01” as opposite to “XHTML 1.0” in the latter.

What you have actually observed is the difference between the two document type declarations

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">

and

 <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">

The former puts browsers to “standards mode”, whereas the latter puts them to “quirks mode”. In quirks mode, strange things may and will happen. This may include nonstandard calculation of widths and heights.

Unless this is about a legacy page that relies on quirks mode, you should use “standards mode” and use CSS and DOM by the specifications.

share|improve this answer

Here is a good comparison of these two document standards: http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/diffs.html

In short: with XHTML you have to follow the XML structure, just as with any other XML document. HTML4 Transitional is more flexible and allows e.g. usage of additional attributes in tags or skipping of some attributes.

EDIT:

  • document.documentElement seems to work in IE standard mode
  • document.body in IE quirks mode and all other browsers I usually use.

document.body is more of a standard than the other one. But it does not relate to the (X)HTML standard.

share|improve this answer

The HTML 4.01 strict doc type i.e "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//" , validates against the HTML 4.01 spec, although it doesn't allow any presentation markup or deprecated elements (such as font elements) or framesets to be used. It validates loose HTML style markup, such as minimized attributes and non-quoted attributes (eg required, rather than required="required")

The HTML 4.01 transitional doc type i.e "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" validates against the HTML 4.01 spec. It allows some presentation markup and deprecated elements (such as font elements) but not framesets. Again, it validates loose HTML style markup

These are the exact XHTML 1.0 equivalents of the HTML 4.01 doctypes i.e "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" or "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" we discussed above, so functionally they are the same, except that they won't validate loose HTML style markup: it all needs to be well formed XML.

share|improve this answer

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