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I have javascript:

$('#link').on('click', function ()
{
    console.log('Click link');
});

And i write dalekjs-test:

module.exports = {
    'Clicked link': function (test)
    {
        test.open('http://localhost/')
            .click('#link')
            .done();
    }
};

And after running $ dalek tests/test.js i wanna see that Click link.

How can i get it?

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1 Answer 1

This is currently not possible & I do not know if it will be possible in the future. The thing is, you have to overwrite the console object in the browser. That would mean, you have to actively change something in the environment of your user. And I don't think that this is a good idea.

Although, there might be a workaround for your Problem ;)

Lets say, you write a debugging function (as a client side javascript file) like this:

window.myDebugLog = [];
window.myDebug = function () {
  var list = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0);
  window.myDebugLog.push(list);
}

Now, lets modify your logging function a bit:

$('#link').on('click', function () {
  var msg = 'Click link';
  console.log(msg);
  window.myDebug(msg);
});

With this you can access & output your logging. Even better, with some ClojureCompiler or Esprima fun, you could parse out that debugging stuff when building your production code, so that you do not need to ship it.

In your Dalek test, just do this:

module.exports = {
  'Clicked link': function (test) {
    test.open('http://localhost/')
        .click('#link')
        .execute(function () {
          this.data('logs', window.myDebugLog);
        })
        .log.message(function () {
           return JSON.stringify(test.data('logs').pop());
         })
        .done();
  }
};

That will give you your log stuff in the Command Line Output. If you´re not willing to add this extra function call, you could also overwrite the console.log on your own. But that could cause some trouble, so take this with a grain of salt:

window.myDebugLog = [];
window.oldLog = console.log;
console.log = function () {
  var list = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0);
  window.myDebugLog.push(list);
  window.oldLog.apply(console, list);
};

Hope that helps you with your problem.

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