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See the code below:

var text=["yuppie", "kkkoseh", "watchdog"];

var messageIndex=0;

function looptext (){
    var MessageElement= document.getElementById("happy").innerHTML
    var Message=text[messageIndex];

    MessageElement=Message;
    messageIndex++;

    if(messageIndex>=text.length){
        messageIndex=0;
    }
}

window.onload = function() {
    setInterval(looptext, 1000);
};

It doesn't work.

But when I remove .innerhtml at variable MessageElement and set the MessageElement.innerHtml= Message , it works.

Why is it so?
Sorry, I am a newbie learning JavaScript.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because that's how variables and values work in JavaScript. Imagine variables to be like containers. With

var MessageElement = document.getElementById("happy").innerHTML

the container MessageElement will contain a string. Later on, with

MessageElement = Message;

you simply put a new value in the container, overwriting the previous value/content the container had. But it doesn't have any effect on the location where the previous value was coming from.


But when I remove .innerhtml at variable MessageElement and set the MessageElement.innerHtml= Message , it works.

Now the variable contains a reference to the DOM element and

MessageElement.innerHtml = Message

doesn't assign a new value to the variable (doesn't put a new value in the container), it uses the value of the variable (container).

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Thank you.. I am just curious, Is there a way to include .innerHtml into a variable ? A variable to store the reference point. –  user3322381 Feb 18 at 8:45
    
@user3322381: No, JavaScript is assign-by-value, not assign-by-reference. –  Felix Kling Feb 18 at 8:52

innerHTML return a string not e pointer to the document.getElementById("happy")'s text node.

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try this

var text=["yuppie", "kkkoseh", "watchdog"];

var messageIndex=0;

function looptext (){
document.getElementById("happy").innerHTML = text[messageIndex];
messageIndex++;
if(messageIndex>=text.length){
    messageIndex=0;
}
}    
window.onload = function() {
setInterval(looptext, 1000);
};
share|improve this answer

@Felix King is correct.

To test how it is actually behaving I myself tried the below snippet on W3Schools.
And I found:

  1. var MessageElement = document.getElementById("happy") - assigns the element (in my example - http://www.microsoft.com/)
  2. alert(m) thus displays - http://www.microsoft.com/
  3. m.innerHTML = "Atul" - assigns Atul to the element.
  4. However, value of m was still http://www.microsoft.com/ as Felix rightly said - 'MessageElement.innerHtml = Message, doesn't assign a new value to the variable'.

    <html>
    <head>
    <script>
    function changeLink()
    {
    var m = document.getElementById("myAnchor"); //assigns http://www.microsoft.com/
    alert(m); //
    m.innerHTML = "Atul"
    alert(document.getElementById("myAnchor").innerHTML + " new");
    document.getElementById('myAnchor').innerHTML=m;
    }
    </script>
    </head>
    <body>
    
    <a id="myAnchor" href="http://www.microsoft.com">Microsoft</a>
    <input type="button" onclick="changeLink()" value="Change link">
    
    </body>
    </html> 
    

Thanks Felix :)

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