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in the code:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<style>
.parent {
    position: absolute;
    top:500px;  
    width:400px;
    border:1px solid green;
} 

.parent:before {
    z-index:-1;
    content:'';
    position:absolute;

    opacity:0.5;
    width:400px;
    height:200px;
    background-image:url('wallpaper324845.jpg');
    border:1px solid red;
}

.child {
    Color:black;
    border:1px solid black;
}
</style>
</head>

<body>
<div class="parent">
    <div class="child">Hello I am child</div>
</div>
</body>

</html>

I'm trying to create a transparent background as described in this thread: How to set opacity in parent div and not effect in child div?.

Looking at the code from the 4th answer. How does this work, I'm confused with the use of .parent and .parent:before. I would think that this would create a .parent:before element before every parent element. Really confused how does this work?

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Refer to this MDN page: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/::before –  Ranveer Feb 18 '14 at 9:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

:before creates a virtual content using CSS, so in the above case, author uses below snippet means

.parent:before{
   z-index:-1;
   content:'';
   position:absolute;
   opacity:0.5;
   width:400px;
   height:200px;
   background-image:url('wallpaper324845.jpg');
   border:1px solid red;
}

He is creating a virtual element using :before, which he then positions absolute, assigns some dimensions, and assigns the background, to make sure that it stays below the div content, he uses z-index: -1;


In other words, :before, :after are nothing but assume nesting two span elements inside your div, but by using pseudo elements, you don't need to have span as you can achieve the same thing with the pseudo elements.

Consider you have something like this

<div>
    Hello
    <span></span>
</div>

div {
   position: relative; 
}

div span {
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    background: #f00;
    z-index: -1;
    left: 0;
    top: 0;
}

Demo

Can be also achieved using :before or :after, markup stays the same but CSS goes like

div {
   position: relative; 
}

div:after {
    content: "";
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    background: #f00;
    z-index: -1;
    left: 0;
    top: 0;
}

Demo

So, it just saves you one empty element in your HTML, but if you look at the above CSS, am using content property which is ALWAYS associated with :before or :after, and yes, it is required, even if you keep it blank.


Also, note that :before and :after generated content are inline, so inorder to make height, width work, you need to explicitly mention display: block; or display: inline-block; if you want to make it block level, but in this particular case, you won't need that as the pseudo element is positioned absolute

div:after {
    content: "Hello";
    margin-top: 20px; /* This wont work as pseudo is inline by default */
}

Demo


So make it block or inline-block

Demo

share|improve this answer
    
Thanx for the explanation. Just to clarify on one point "you need to explicitly mention display:block; or display:inline-block;" The author does not use that in his/her example and you don't use it either can you please explain why –  user3247608 Feb 18 '14 at 9:11
    
@user3247608 Because he is using position: absolute; :) so you don't need to define display: block; –  Mr. Alien Feb 18 '14 at 9:14
1  
Ok got it, thanx –  user3247608 Feb 18 '14 at 9:15
    
@user3247608 You welcome :) –  Mr. Alien Feb 18 '14 at 9:15

Authors specify the style and location of generated content with the :before and :after pseudo-elements. As their names indicate, the :before and :after pseudo-elements specify the location of content before and after an element's document tree content. The 'content' property, in conjunction with these pseudo-elements, specifies what is inserted.

Below is a document tree with HTML as root.

HTML
.HEAD    
..TITLE
.BODY
..H1
..P
..UL
...LI
...LI
...LI

For example, the following rule inserts the string "Note: " before the content of every P element whose "class" attribute has the value "note":

p.note:before { content: "Note: " }

The formatting objects (e.g., boxes) generated by an element include generated content. So, for example, changing the above style sheet to:

p.note:before { content: "Note: " }
p.note        { border: solid green }

would cause a solid green border to be rendered around the entire paragraph, including the initial string.

The :before and :after pseudo-elements inherit any inheritable properties from the element in the document tree to which they are attached.

For example, the following rules insert an open quote mark before every Q element. The color of the quote mark will be red, but the font will be the same as the font of the rest of the Q element:

q:before {
  content: open-quote;
  color: red
}

In a :before or :after pseudo-element declaration, non-inherited properties take their initial values.

So, for example, because the initial value of the 'display' property is 'inline', the quote in the previous example is inserted as an inline box (i.e., on the same line as the element's initial text content). The next example explicitly sets the 'display' property to 'block', so that the inserted text becomes a block:

body:after {
    content: "The End";
    display: block;
    margin-top: 2em;
    text-align: center;
}

The :before and :after pseudo-elements elements interact with other boxes, such as run-in boxes, as if they were real elements inserted just inside their associated element.

For example, the following document fragment and style sheet:

<h2> Header </h2>               h2 { display: run-in; }
<p> Text </p>                   p:before { display: block; content: 'Some'; }

...would render in exactly the same way as the following document fragment and style sheet:

<h2> Header </h2>            h2 { display: run-in; }
<p><span>Some</span> Text </p>  span { display: block }

Similarly, the following document fragment and style sheet:

<h2> Header </h2>     h2 { display: run-in; }
                      h2:after { display: block; content: 'Thing'; }
<p> Text </p>

...would render in exactly the same way as the following document fragment and style sheet:

<h2> Header <span>Thing</span></h2>   h2 { display: block; }
                                      span { display: block; }
<p> Text </p>
share|improve this answer
    
You just copy pasted entire W3C article here? Better if you would've commented with a link on the question –  Mr. Alien Feb 18 '14 at 9:13
    
i'm sorry for that, thought rather going there and reading, the one who questioned would get everything under a hood along with other answers. –  user2423959 Feb 18 '14 at 11:06

Basically, :before (like :after) is a CSS pseudo-element. So it's almost like a HTML inline element. Almost.

To play with pseudo elements, you need to give it a content property (empty string in most cases). Note that it's an inline element by default, so it can't have width / height. You need to set display: block (or inline-block, or whatever).

I think you missed to set the relative position on the parent element (.parent). There it is :

.parent{
  position: relative;
  top:500px;  
  width:400px;
  border:1px solid green;
} 
share|improve this answer

Try looking at this article. it explains how :before and :after pseudo selectors work:

http://coding.smashingmagazine.com/2011/07/13/learning-to-use-the-before-and-after-pseudo-elements-in-css/

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The :before selector inserts content before the content of the selected element(s).'

we Use the content property to specify the content to insert.

The :before selector is supported in all major browsers.

For example the below code would

        <!DOCTYPE html>
        <html>
        <head>
        <style>
        p:before
        { 
        content:"Read this -";
        background-color:yellow;
        color:red;
        font-weight:bold;
        }
        </style>
        </head>

        <body>
        <p>My name is Donald</p>
        <p>I live in Ducksburg</p>

        <p><b>Note:</b> For :before to work in IE8, a DOCTYPE must be declared.</p>

        </body>
        </html>

give output as

enter image description here

Source : http://www.w3schools.com/cssref/sel_before.asp

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