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I've seen lot of examples for c# Indexers, but in what way will it help me in real life situations.

I know the C# guru wouldn't have added this if it wasn't a serious feature, but i cant think of a real world situation (not the foo bar stuff) to use indexers.

Note:I realize a related question exists, but it doesn't help me much.

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Other than in the List-type, the LinkedList-type, the Dictionary-type or the other collections? ;) Often when you have a list of something it is considered useful to provide an indexer, so one can do myList[k] instead of myList.Get(k) or the VB-version myList.Item(k) –  Skurmedel Feb 2 '10 at 15:17
    
@Skurmedel Please explain, I'm obviously missing something –  Vivek Bernard Feb 2 '10 at 15:19
    
Righto, updated my comment. –  Skurmedel Feb 2 '10 at 15:19
3  
Yes if your class mimics a storage of some sort or if it contains individual pieces of data you may want to retrieve. String has an indexer, so you can do str[1] to retrieve the second character. FontStorage[key] may make sense, Font[key] probably wouldn't. How the data is stored is usually not important, but the interface (the appearence/representation) determines if an indexer makes sense. That said, I use them very seldom, but they come in handy sometimes. I made a ASP.NET Cache wrapper where Cache["key"] made sense, a real world scenario ;) –  Skurmedel Feb 2 '10 at 15:31
1  
don't forget DataSet and DataTable and DataColumn and DataRow. these all use indexers too! –  Muad'Dib Feb 2 '10 at 15:32

13 Answers 13

up vote 18 down vote accepted

The way I look at indexers is that (rightly or wrongly!), accessing something by index should be more efficient than accessing it any other way, because in some way, shape or form, the class whose indexer I'm using stores some form of index that allows it to quickly lookup values when accessed that way.

The classic example is an array, when you access element n of an array by using the code myarray[3], the compiler/interpreter knows how big (memory-wise) elements of the array are and can treat it as an offset from the start of the array. You could also "for(int i = 0; i < myarray.length; i++) { if (i = 3) then { .. do stuff } }" (not that you'd ever want to!), which would be less efficient. It also shows how an array is a bad example.

Say you had a collection class that stores, umm, DVDs, so:

public class DVDCollection
{
    private static Dictionary<string, DVD> store = 
                   new Dictionary<string, DVD>();
    private static Dictionary<ProductId, string> dvdsByProductId = 
                   new Dictionary<string, string>();

    public DVDCollection()
    {
       // gets DVD data from somewhere and stores it *by* TITLE in "store"
       // stores a lookup set of DVD ProductId's and names in "dvdsByProductid"
    }

    // Get the DVD concerned, using an index, by product Id
    public DVD this[ProductId index]  
    {
       string title = dvdsByProductId[index];
       return store[title];
    }
}

Just my 2p, but, like I said,.. I've always considered an "indexer" as being an expedient way of getting data out of something.

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The most obvious examples, as mentioned by Skurmedel, are List<T> and Dictionary<TKey, TValue>. What would you prefer over:

List<string> list = new List<string> { "a", "b", "c" };
string value = list[1]; // This is using an indexer

Dictionary<string, string> dictionary = new Dictionary<string, string>
{
    { "foo", "bar" },
    { "x", "y" }
};
string value = dictionary["x"]; // This is using an indexer

? Now it may be relatively rare for you need to write an indexer (usually when you're creating a collection-like class), but I suspect you use them reasonably frequently.

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1  
Does this mean multiple indexers cannot exist. or in other words can they be overloaded? –  Vivek Bernard Feb 2 '10 at 15:28
1  
@Vivek Bernard: They can be overloaded. –  OregonGhost Feb 2 '10 at 15:34
    
@OregonGhost thanks just realized that :) –  Vivek Bernard Feb 2 '10 at 15:40

Microsoft has an example using an indexer to treat a file as an array of bytes.

public byte this[long index]
{
    // Read one byte at offset index and return it.
    get 
    {
        byte[] buffer = new byte[1];
        stream.Seek(index, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        stream.Read(buffer, 0, 1);
        return buffer[0];
    }
    // Write one byte at offset index and return it.
    set 
    {
        byte[] buffer = new byte[1] {value};
        stream.Seek(index, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        stream.Write(buffer, 0, 1);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Let's say you have a collection of objects that you want to be able to index by something other than the order in which it was placed in a collection. In the example below, you can see how you could use the 'Location' property of some object and using the indexer, return all objects in the collection that match you location, or in the second example, all objects that contain a certain Count() of objects.

class MyCollection {

  public IEnumerable<MyObject> this[string indexer] {
    get{ return this.Where(p => p.Location == indexer); }
  }

  public IEnumerable<MyObject> this[int size] {
    get{ return this.Where(p => p.Count() == size);}
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Once .NET got generics, the biggest reason for me to implement an indexer (to implement a strongly-typed collection) went away.

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8  
Why would the need for an indexer lessen with generics? Or do you mean that you no longer had a need to write your own collections? –  Skurmedel Feb 2 '10 at 15:21

In ASP.Net, there are a few different times where an indexer is used such as reading something from any of the Request, Session or Application objects. I've seen often where something is stored in either the Session or Application object only to be used again and again.

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It is just syntactical sugar for collection type classes. I never had a reason to write such a class. So I think there are very rare uses of it in "real life", because the classes using it are already implemented.

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Don’t forget that one mans rarity is another’s requirement. While they are syntacical sugar... you could say that about most of the framework. (Enum, Properties, Operator Overloading, Linq, WCF, etc.) –  Matthew Whited Feb 2 '10 at 15:43
    
@Matthew: is there any difference between having an indexer or having a GetElement method? The indexer is shorter to use. –  Stefan Steinegger Feb 2 '10 at 15:57
    
There is no difference between using a Property and a GetProperty method either. If you at the compiled code this happens for you in the back ground. Every keyword we use (beyond the OpCodes for the CPU or Runtime) is form of syntactical sugar... and I, for one, love sugar. For example... when you use a indexer in C# you declare it on the class with the this keyword. On VB.Net you just pick a property and add an input parameter. –  Matthew Whited Feb 2 '10 at 16:13
    
@Matthew: Did I say that it is not useful or that I don't like it? I just said that there is nothing so special about it, just to make the usage of collection type classes nicer. I don't know what you want to tell me. –  Stefan Steinegger Feb 3 '10 at 12:40
    
I didn't mean to say either. Your answer just seemed like the many I see about "unneeded" and "unwanted" features. (Along the lines of people that are complaining because LINQ syntax was added.) If you are all for indexers then we agree :) I say use them wherever you need or want to use them. This stuff is all just tools to help make our lives as developers easier. –  Matthew Whited Feb 3 '10 at 14:29

http://code-kings.blogspot.in/2012/09/indexers-in-c-5.html

Indexers are elements in a C# program that allow a Class to behave as an Array. You would be able to use the entire class as an array. In this array you can store any type of variables. The variables are stored at a separate location but addressed by the class name itself. Creating indexers for Integers, Strings, Boolean etc. would be a feasible idea. These indexers would effectively act on objects of the class.

Lets suppose you have created a class indexer that stores the roll number of a student in a class. Further, lets suppose that you have created an object of this class named obj1. When you say obj1[0], you are referring to the first student on roll. Likewise obj1[1] refers to the 2nd student on roll.

Therefore the object takes indexed values to refer to the Integer variable that is privately or publicly stored in the class. Suppose you did not have this facility then you would probably refer in this way(which would be longer):

obj1.RollNumberVariable[0]
obj1.RollNumberVariable[1]. 

where RollNumberVariable would be the Integer variable that refers to the Roll Number of the current student object.

For more details http://code-kings.blogspot.in/2012/09/indexers-in-c-5.html

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using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace IndexerSample
{
    class FailSoftArray 
    {
        int[] a; // reference to underlying array
        public int Length; // Length is public
        public bool ErrFlag; // indicates outcome of last operation
        // Construct array given its size.
        public FailSoftArray(int size)
        {
            a = new int[size];
            Length = size;
        }
        // This is the indexer for FailSoftArray.
        public int this[int index] 
        {
        // This is the get accessor.
            get
            {
                if (ok(index))
                {
                    ErrFlag = false;
                    return a[index];
                }
                else
                {
                    ErrFlag = true;
                    return 0;
                }
            }
            // This is the set accessor.
            set
            {
                if (ok(index))
                {
                    a[index] = value;
                    ErrFlag = false;
                }
                else ErrFlag = true;
            }
        }
        // Return true if index is within bounds.
        private bool ok(int index)
        {
            if (index >= 0 & index < Length) return true;
            return false;
        }
    }
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            FailSoftArray fs = new FailSoftArray(5);
            int x;
            // Show quiet failures.
            Console.WriteLine("Fail quietly.");
            for (int i = 0; i < (fs.Length * 2); i++)
                fs[i] = i * 10;
            for (int i = 0; i < (fs.Length * 2); i++)
            {
                x = fs[i];
                if (x != -1) Console.Write(x + " ");
            }
            Console.WriteLine();
            // Now, display failures.
            Console.WriteLine("\nFail with error reports.");
            for (int i = 0; i < (fs.Length * 2); i++)
            {
                fs[i] = i * 10;
                if (fs.ErrFlag)
                    Console.WriteLine("fs[" + i + "] out-of-bounds");
            }
            for (int i = 0; i < (fs.Length * 2); i++)
            {
                x = fs[i];
                if (!fs.ErrFlag) Console.Write(x + " ");
                else
                    Console.WriteLine("fs[" + i + "] out-of-bounds");
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
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Heres a video i have created http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdtEQqu0yOY and below is a detailed explanation about the same.

Indexers helps to access contained collection with in a class using a simplified interface. It’s a syntactic sugar.

For instance lets say you have a customer class with addresses collection inside it. Now let’s say we would like to like fetch the addresses collection by “Pincode” and “PhoneNumber”. So the logical step would be that you would go and create two overloaded functions one which fetches by using “PhoneNumber” and the other by “PinCode”. You can see in the below code we have two functions defined.

Customer Customers = new Customer();
Customers.getAddress(1001);
Customers.getAddress("9090");

If you use indexer you can simplify the above code with something as shown in the below code.

Customer Customers = new Customer();
Address o = Customers[10001];
o = Customers["4320948"];

Cheers.

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http://code-kings.blogspot.in/2012/09/indexers-in-c-5.html

using System;

namespace Indexers_Example

{

class Indexers
{

    private Int16[] RollNumberVariable;

    public Indexers(Int16 size)
    {
        RollNumberVariable = new Int16[size];

        for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
        {
            RollNumberVariable[i] = 0;
        }
    }

    public Int16 this[int pos]
    {
        get
        {
            return RollNumberVariable[pos];
        }
        set
        {
            RollNumberVariable[pos] = value;
        }
    }
}

}

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Addition to @code-kings post.

Moreover, calling RollNumberVariable[0] will trigger the behavior of the default collection's indexer. While indexers are actually properties, it's on your behalf to write your own logic when extracting data. You can easily delegate most of index-parameter value to the internal collection but you can also return any arbitrary value for certain index values.

Just an example - you can have 2+ internal collections in different format, but the external user will interact with them trough a single indexer (which will kinda work as a dispatcher), while those collection will be hidden. This pretty much encourages the encapsulation principle.

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I am trying to get images from a sequence file. I need some sort of a 2D array or a jagged array to hold the pixel values. I am using indexers instead of arrays because looping over indexers is faster than looping over 2D or jagged arrays.

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