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I've read several articles that one of the mistakes a common programmer does is not using SQL's potential and since then I started searching for replacing parts of my code with SQLish solutions rather than fetching data and processing with a programming language, although I'm a real rookie with SQL.

Say I have a table randomly populated with values from 0 to 10 and I want to know which values are missing in this range.

For example, the table consists these values: 0, 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9.

The query should return: 2, 6, 10.

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marked as duplicate by Tomasz Kowalczyk, Ian Kenney, M Khalid Junaid, vorrtex, Dour High Arch Mar 3 at 17:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
IDK what level of programming you're on, but if you're willing to accept some advice I can assure that you'll have problems with this: "I started searching for replacing parts of my code with SQLish solutions". –  Tomasz Kowalczyk Feb 18 at 11:03
1  
Which database system is it? –  Szymon Feb 18 at 11:08

2 Answers 2

[F5] solution (assuming sql server):

-- table with id=0..10 
drop table #temp 
GO
create table #temp (
    id int not null identity(0,1),
    x int
)
GO
insert into #temp (x) values(0)
GO 11


-- your number:
drop table #numbers
GO
select
    *
into #numbers
from (
    select 0 as n union all select  1 union all select  3 union all select  4 union all select  5 union all select  7 union all select  8 union all select  9
) x
GO

-- result:
select 
    * 
from #temp t
left join #numbers n
    on t.id=n.n
where 1=1
    and n.n is null 
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Why the where 1=1? –  DrCopyPaste Feb 18 at 11:47
    
@DrCopyPaste Just my habit :). –  Adam Łuniewski Feb 18 at 11:52
    
that's what I thought, but where does it originate from? Are there some rare occasionse where it gets you a huge benefit? just curious, maybe it's worth adopting that habit :D –  DrCopyPaste Feb 18 at 11:55
    
@DrCopyPaste OK :). 1) If you have 2 and conditions, you can comment the first one without breaking the query (otherwise you'd be left with where and). 2) It improves readability. If there are multiple and conditions, they're just all nicely aligned. But if there have many nested and's and or's, it can get very messy. So I use 1=1 and... and... and 1=2 or... or... to get a nice structure of conditions. –  Adam Łuniewski Feb 18 at 12:05
    
ty for clearing that up, makes sense ;) –  DrCopyPaste Feb 18 at 12:17

This solution uses SQL-Server-Syntax (but AFAIK only GO is specific to the SQL Server Management Studio)

I would join against a table valued function that gets you all numbers in a certain range (example fiddle):

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.GetNumbersInRange(@Min INT, @Max INT)
        RETURNS @trackingItems TABLE (Number INT) 
        AS BEGIN

        DECLARE @counter INT = @Min

        WHILE (@counter <= @Max)
        BEGIN
          INSERT INTO @trackingItems (Number) SELECT @counter

          SELECT @counter = @counter + 1

        END

        RETURN

        END
        GO

As an example I have set up a table that contains some numbers (with gaps)

CREATE TABLE MyNumbers (Number INT)

INSERT INTO MyNumbers (Number)
  SELECT 1
  UNION
  SELECT 2
  UNION
  SELECT 4
  UNION
  SELECT 5
  UNION
  SELECT 7
  UNION
  SELECT 8

To find the missing numbers you can use a LEFT JOIN like this

SELECT
        AllNumbers.Number
      FROM GetNumbersInRange(1, 10) AS AllNumbers
      LEFT JOIN MyNumbers ON AllNumbers.Number = MyNumbers.Number
      WHERE MyNumbers.Number IS NULL
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