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So normally and very inefficiently min/max filter is implemented by using four for loops.

for( index1 < dy ) { // y loop
    for( index2 < dx ) { // x loop
        for( index3 < StructuringElement.dy() ) { // kernel y
            for( index4 < StructuringElement.dx() ) { // kernel x
                pixel = src(index3+index4);
                val = (pixel > val) ? pixel : val; // max
            }
        }
        dst(index2, index1) = val;
    }
}

However this approach is damn inefficient since it checks again previously checked values. So I am wondering what methods are there to implement this with using previously checked values on next iteration?

Any assumptions regarding structuring element size/point of origin can be made.

Update: I am especially keen to know any insights of this or kind of implementation: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2114689

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This is not a full solution, merely one idea: I think the operation is decomposable, i.e. you can get a 3x3 dilation by performing a 3x1 dilation and a 1x3 dilation in a row, which is much faster. A 1x9 dilation can be decomposed into two 1x3 dilations. (I know this is true for a Gaussian blur, but am unsure whether it applies to erosion/dilation.) – HugoRune Feb 18 '14 at 17:24

I have been following this question for some time, hoping someone would write a fleshed-out answer, since I am pondering the same problem.

Here is my own attempt so far; I have not tested this, but I think you can do repeated dilation and erosion with any structuring element, by only accessing each pixel twice:

Assumptions: Assume the structuring element/kernel is a KxL rectangle and the image is a NxM rectangle. Assume that K and L are odd.

The basic approach you outlined has four for loops and takes O(K*L*N*M) time to complete.

Often you want to dilate repeatedly with the same kernel, so the time is again multiplied by the desired number of dilations.

I have three basic ideas for speeding up the dilation:

  1. dilation by a KxL kernel is equal to dilation by a Kx1 kernel followed by dilation by a 1xL kernel. You can do both of these dilations with only three for loops, in O(K*N*M) and O(L*N*M)

  2. However you can do a dilation with a Kx1 kernel much faster: You only need to access each pixel once. For this you need a particular data structure, explained below. This allows you to do a single dilation in O(N*M), regardless of the kernel size

  3. repeated dilation by a Kx1 kernel is equal to a single dilation by a larger kernel. If you dilate P times with a Kx1 kernel, this is equal to a single dilation with a ((K-1)*P + 1) x 1 kernel. So you can do repeated dilation with any kernel size in a single pass, in O(N*M) time.


Now for a detailed description of step 2.
You need a queue with the following properties:

  • push an element to the back of the queue in constant time.
  • pop an element from the front of the queue in constant time.
  • query the current smallest or largest element in the queue in constant time.

How to build such a queue is described in this stackoverflow answer: Implement a queue in which push_rear(), pop_front() and get_min() are all constant time operations. Unfortunately not much pseudocode, but the basic idea seems sound.

Using such a queue, you can calculate a Kx1 dilation in a single pass:

Assert(StructuringElement.dy()==1);
int kernel_half = (StructuringElement.dx()-1) /2;

for( y < dy ) { // y loop

    for( x <= kernel_half ) { // initialize the queue 
        queue.Push(src(x, y));
    }

    for( x < dx ) { // x loop

        // get the current maximum of all values in the queue
         dst(x, y) = queue.GetMaximum();

        // remove the first pixel from the queue
        if (x > kernel_half)
            queue.Pop();

        // add the next pixel to the queue
        if (x < dx - kernel_half)
            queue.Push(src(x + kernel_half, y));
    }
}
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a theoretical way of improving the complexity would be to maintain a BST for the KxK pixels, delete previsous Kx1 pixels and add the next Kx1 pixels to it. The cost of this operation would be 2K log K and it would be repeated NxN times. Overall the computation time would become NxNxKxlog K from NxNxKxK

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Same kind of optimizations can be used as "non maximum suppression" algorithms http://www.vision.ee.ethz.ch/publications/papers/proceedings/eth_biwi_00446.pdf

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The only approach I can think of is to buffer the maximum pixel values and the rows in which they are found so that you only have to do the full iteration over a kernel sized row/column when the maximum is no longer under it.
In the following C-like pseudo code, I have assumed signed integers, 2d row-major arrays for the source and destination and a rectangular kernel over [±dx, ±dy].

//initialise the maxima and their row positions
for(x=0; x < nx; ++x)
{
  row[x] = -1;
  buf[x] = 0;
}

for(sy=0; sy < ny; ++sy)
{
  //update the maxima and their row positions
  for(x=0; x < nx; ++x)
  {
    if(row[x] < max(sy-dy, 0))
    {
      //maximum out of scope, search column
      row[x] = max(sy-dy, 0);
      buf[x] = src[row[x]][x];
      for(y=row[x]+1; y <= min(sy+dy, ny-1); ++y)
      {
        if(src[y][x]>=buf[x])
        {
          row[x] = y;
          buf[x] = src[y][x];
        }
      }
    }
    else
    {
      //maximum in scope, check latest value
      y = min(sy+dy, ny-1);
      if(src[y][x] >= buf[x])
      {
        row[x] = y;
        buf[x] = src[y][x];
      }
    }
  }

  //initialise maximum column position
  col = -1;

  for(sx=0; sx < nx; ++sx)
  {
    //update maximum column position
    if(col<max(sx-dx, 0))
    {
      //maximum out of scope, search buffer
      col = max(sx-dx, 0);
      for(x=col+1; x <= min(sx+dx, nx-1); ++x)
      {
        if(buf[x] >= buf[col]) col = x;
      }
    }
    else
    {
      //maximum in scope, check latest value
      x = min(sx+dx, nx-1);
      if(buf[x] >= buf[col]) col = x;
    }

    //assign maximum to destination
    dest[sy][sx] = buf[col];
  }
}

The worst case performance occurs when the source goes smoothly from a maximum at the top left to a minimum at the bottom right, forcing a full row or column scan at each step (although it's still more efficient than the original nested loops).
I would expect average case performance to be much better though, since regions containing increasing values (both row and column wise) will update the maximum before a scan is required.
That said, not having actually tested it I'd recommend that you run a few benchmarks rather than trust my gut feeling!

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I tried this approach, but I failed to create appropiate output. I might have understood something incorrectly with this pseudo code. Can you please describe following vars: nx, ny, sy, sx, dx, dy – ckain Apr 18 '14 at 12:06
    
@ckain: nx and ny are the width and height of the image (I'm assuming the filter is applied to the whole image). sx and sy are iterators over it and dx and dy are horizontal and vertical offsets of the rectangular kernal. – thus spake a.k. Apr 18 '14 at 12:10
    
@ckain: I should add that I haven't actually tested the pseudo code. The idea I'm suggesting is to keep track of the maximum value and its position so that you only update it when you absolutely have to. – thus spake a.k. Apr 18 '14 at 12:23
    
@ckain: OK, so I've run some tests and I'm seeing the results I expected. How did it fail for you? I may have misunderstood the problem :-/ – thus spake a.k. Apr 18 '14 at 18:10

In 1D, using morphological wavelet transform in O(N) :

https://gist.github.com/matovitch/11206318

You could get O(N * M) in 2D. HugoRune solution is way simpler and probably faster (though this one could probably be improved).

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