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Script Example:

@SET APPLY_ORA=YES
@REM ...
IF %APPLY_ORA%==YES (
@ECHO Doing Oracle
CALL %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_COMMAND% %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_FLAGS%
CALL %ANOTHER_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_COMMAND% %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_FLAGS%
) ELSE (
@ECHO Skipping Oracle
)

The idea is that I do not want to see IF YES==YES ( ) ELSE ( ) printed, particularly because it is split amongst multiple lines. I do however want to see the actual commands following CALL printed to the screen.

Now, I can make IF silent by appending an @ in front of IF But that makes it too silent! I do not see the actual commands being used, only their output. How can I reach the point of perfection when using Dos Scripting. Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

The other answers are unnecessarily complex or do not save the state of the echo (on or off). Simply prefix the command with an ampersand and change your statement:

@SET APPLY_ORA=YES
@REM ...
@IF %APPLY_ORA%==YES GOTO :apply_ora ELSE GOTO :skip_ora

:apply_ora
@ECHO Doing Oracle
CALL %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_COMMAND% %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_FLAGS%
CALL %ANOTHER_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_COMMAND% %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_FLAGS%
@GOTO :end

:skip_ora
@ECHO Skipping Oracle

:end
share|improve this answer
    
If the script is as simple as the example that's a workable solution (but then maintaining the state of the echo wouldn't be an issue either). If the script is large, complex, and/or comprised of a set of scripts, going though and prefixing all the commands with an '@' (except the ones you don't want to silence) can be a chore. Also, if you're concerned about preserving the echo state, presumably the script might be run with it either on or off, in which case the commands without an '@' prefix might not echo as desired. –  Michael Burr Feb 10 '10 at 1:04
    
@Michael: agreed. The question specifically only talks of the single if, but it could have been a simplified example. –  JRL Feb 10 '10 at 4:29

Turn echo off first, and then on later when you want to see the command.

@echo off
@SET APPLY_ORA=YES
@REM ...
IF %APPLY_ORA%==YES (
    @ECHO Doing Oracle
    @echo on
    CALL %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_COMMAND% %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_FLAGS%
    CALL %ANOTHER_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_COMMAND% %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_FLAGS%
) ELSE (
    @ECHO Skipping Oracle
)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I will try that. What if I want to restore the state of the echo to what it was before (it is a longish script)? It could be off or on previously. –  Hamish Grubijan Feb 2 '10 at 16:30
    
Hm, I don't see a way to do this. You may be better off with Michael's solution if you need this. –  recursive Feb 2 '10 at 16:34

Something as simple (and ugly) as the following might work:

@SET APPLY_ORA=YES
@REM ...
@echo off
IF %APPLY_ORA%==YES (
@ECHO Doing Oracle
@echo on
CALL %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_COMMAND% %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_FLAGS%
CALL %ANOTHER_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_COMMAND% %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_FLAGS%
@echo off
) ELSE (
@ECHO Skipping Oracle
)

I have also used code like the following to give much more control over when a command is displayed. It's come in very handy for debugging scripts that I normally don't want to have the commands displayed, but do want to display them when things go wrong (which is quite often with cmd scripts):

(set COMMAND="%PROG_FILES%\Microsoft Visual Studio\VC98\Bin\cl" /GX /Zi -D_WIN32_WINNT=%WIN32_WINNT% %SOURCE_FILE% /link /INCREMENTAL:NO %LIBRARIES%)
call :exec %COMMAND%


rem ...

rem exec - a subroutine that executes a command and optionally displays it first
rem        depending on the value of the %ECHO_COMMANDLINE% variable
:exec
if {%ECHO_COMMANDLINE%} == {1} (
echo %*
)
%*
goto :eof

If you want to execute a command after displaying the command unconditionally, the following version of your script uses a simple variation of the above that does the trick:

@echo off
set SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_COMMAND=ftype
set SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_FLAGS=txtfile
set ANOTHER_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_COMMAND=dir

SET APPLY_ORA=YES
REM ...
IF %APPLY_ORA%==YES (
    ECHO Doing Oracle
    call :echoexec %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_COMMAND% %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_FLAGS%
    call :echoexec %ANOTHER_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_COMMAND% %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_FLAGS%
) ELSE (
    ECHO Skipping Oracle
)

rem done with the script
goto :eof


rem - subroutines

@rem echoexec - a subroutine that executes a command also displaying 
@rem         the command that's about to be exectued
:echoexec
@echo %*
@%*
@goto :eof

Finally, you mention that you want to determine the current state of the "echo" command. It's a little tricky because the "echo" command is a built-in intrinsic part of cmd.exe, and not a separate executable file (at least that's what I think makes it tricky). Here's a script that has a subroutine you can use to query the current "echo" status (as well as some commands that test/demonstrate it):

@rem - examples of using the "echo_state" subroutine

@echo
@call :get_echo_state
@echo echo state was %RET%

@echo off
@echo
@call :get_echo_state
@echo echo state was %RET%

@echo on
@echo
@call :get_echo_state
@echo echo state was %RET%

@goto :eof


@rem
@rem  echo_state - returns the current state of the script's echo setting
@rem
@rem    upon return, the environment variable RET will contian the word
@rem    'off' if echo is currently off and 'on' if it's on.  It does this
@rem    by parsing the output of the 'echo' command redirected ot a file.
@rem
@rem    For some reason I find that it's necessary to redirect to a file
@rem    to parse the state, becuase if I try to parse the output of 
@rem    the 'echo' command directly in the "for /f" command like so:
@rem
@rem        @for /f  "tokens=3" %%a in ('echo') do @if "%%a" == "on." set RET=on
@rem
@rem    it always returns that echo is "on" (I suspect this has something to 
@rem    with the 'echo' command being a builtin part of cmd.exe and not
@rem    an external command, but I'm not sure).
@rem

:get_echo_state
@setlocal
@echo > %temp%\echostate.txt
@set RET=off
@for /f  "tokens=3" %%a in (%temp%\echostate.txt) do @if "%%a" == "on." set RET=on
@endlocal & set RET=%RET%
@goto :eof

Personally, I like to immediately set "echo off" at the start of my scripts and use the technique in the my second script above (the 'exec' subroutine) to run a command that might have the command line displayed. I imagine that turning the echo state on and off throughout the script would be a pain to manage.

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This is what I would have done.....I took your code sample and remodified it

@ECHO OFF
@SET APPLY_ORA=YES
@REM ...
IF %APPLY_ORA%==YES (
    @ECHO Doing Oracle
    @ECHO ON
    CALL %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_COMMAND% %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_FLAGS%
    CALL %ANOTHER_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_COMMAND% %SOME_ORACLE_SPECIFIC_FLAGS%
    @ECHO OFF
) ELSE (
    @ECHO Skipping Oracle
    @ECHO ON
    REM Do Something Else
    @ECHO OFF
)
@ECHO ON

I'm not sure if that is what you're asking....

Output

Based from the edited sample, it'll display all commands between the @ECHO ON and @ECHO OFF instruction, (so basically, it'll do the 1st call, and display everything that is executed by the call, and execute the next call, etc.)

share|improve this answer
    
What is the sample output? Could you edit your post please? –  Hamish Grubijan Feb 6 '10 at 3:26
    
Check my edit.... –  Buhake Sindi Feb 8 '10 at 11:19

To echo only the contents of the if-statement, have the if-statement call a subroutine. Turn @echo on at the start of the routine, and @echo off at the end.

:InnerIfStatements
@echo on
::Do stuff here
@echo off
goto :EOF

To set echo back to what it was previously instead, store the echo-status in a variable, and call @echo %ECHOSTATUS% instead.

echo > tempfile.tmp
for /f "tokens=3 delims= " %%i in (tempfile.tmp) do set ECHOSTATUS=%%i
set ECHOSTATUS=%ECHOSTATUS:~0,-1%
del tempfile.tmp

Here is a full, working example:

@echo off
echo Echo is now off

echo > tempfile.tmp
for /f "tokens=3 delims= " %%i in (tempfile.tmp) do set ECHOSTATUS=%%i
set ECHOSTATUS=%ECHOSTATUS:~0,-1%
del tempfile.tmp

if "1" == "1" call :InnerIfStatements

echo Echo should be off again.
pause
exit /b 0

:InnerIfStatements
@echo on
echo Echo is now on.
@echo %ECHOSTATUS%
goto :EOF

Here's the output:

Echo is now off

C:\Users\BlueRaja\Desktop>echo Echo is now on.
Echo is now on.
Echo should be off again.
Press any key to continue . . .

share|improve this answer
    
Could you provide a minimal sample with output please? –  Hamish Grubijan Feb 6 '10 at 3:27
    
@Hamish: Check now. The previous example was incorrect; 'echo' (apparently) calls echo in a separate console, so that it always gets set to 'on.' This new solution works. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Feb 6 '10 at 17:39

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