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I wonder if there a "trick" that permits to know if the used objects in a portion o code has been properly(entirely) disposed, or, in other words don't creates memory leaks.

Let's say I have a container of GDI objects (or other that I need to explicitly dispose)

public class SuperPen 
{
    Pen _flatPen, _2DPen, _3DPen;
    public SuperPen() 
    {
        _flatPen = (Pen)Pens.Black.Clone();
        _2DPen = (Pen)Pens.Black.Clone();
        _3DPen = (Pen)Pens.Black.Clone();
    }
}

Now, as I need to Dispose the GDI objects I do:

public class SuperPen : IDisposable
{
    Pen _flatPen, _2DPen, _3DPen;
    public SuperPen()
    {
        _flatPen = (Pen)Pens.Black.Clone();
        _2DPen = (Pen)Pens.Black.Clone();
        _3DPen = (Pen)Pens.Black.Clone();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (_flatPen != null) { _flatPen.Dispose(); _flatPen = null; }
        // HERE a copy paste 'forget', should be _2DPen instead
        if (_flatPen != null) { _flatPen.Dispose(); _flatPen = null; }
        if (_3DPen != null) { _3DPen.Dispose(); _3DPen = null; }
    }
}

Situation like this can happen if you add a new "disposable" object and forget to dispose it etc. How can I detect my error, I mean, check if my SuperPen was properly disposed?

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My spontaneous though is "why do you clone Pens.Black"? But it is perhaps used only to illustrate the question? –  Fredrik Mörk Feb 2 '10 at 16:36
    
@Frederik: Just is a way to initialize a "Empty" pen. I could do also = new Pen(Color.Black); - do it because show that my object has been created and finally will need a dispose/memory free. –  serhio Feb 2 '10 at 19:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Don't think it is possible; the best you can do is to get a profiler (such as ants profiler) and measure it. If you find that you are leaking memory excessively ( via the profiler), then there is something wrong.

Other than using profiler, I am not sure of any automatic techniques that help you identify undisposed resources.

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1  
If it's not possible, how does ANTS do it? –  Dan Tao Feb 2 '10 at 16:51
    
@Dan: I'm guessing via the profiling API: blong.com/Conferences/DCon2003/Internals/Profiling.htm –  280Z28 Feb 2 '10 at 17:52
    
@280Z28: I meant it as a rhetorical question--I'm pretty sure the fact that ANTS does it (via a .NET API, no less) means that it is possible. That said, I certainly wouldn't do it myself when something like ANTS already exists. –  Dan Tao Feb 2 '10 at 19:05

A tool such as MemProfiler or ANTS Memory Profiler will identify memory leaks (both have trial versions).

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I would suggest using this pattern, which incorporates a destructor to ensure than un-disposed items are cleaned up. This will catch anything that you're not calling 'dispose' on, and is a good fail safe.

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This especially applies to release builds: you should not override the finalizer for any object that doesn't directly hold unmanaged resources due to an unnecessary and significant performance overhead. Unmanaged resources should almost always be held in a class derived from SafeHandle (or similar) to reduce the load on the GC as well. –  280Z28 Feb 2 '10 at 16:35

I believe FxCop (available standalone or integrated into the Team System versions of VS2005+) will detect this.

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