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I just re-read Practical Object Oriented Programming in Ruby by Sandi Metz, especially the chapter on testing. Also a very useful talk that I recommend Rubyists watch: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URSWYvyc42M

She says to test these cases:

  1. Incoming query messages: Test them by asserting what they return.

  2. Incoming command messages: Test the direct public side effects (I have a question about this)

  3. Query messages sent to self: Don't test them

  4. Command messages sent to self: Don't test them

  5. Outgoing query messages: Don't test them

  6. Outgoing command messages: Test that they are sent

For #2, she provided an example similar to this:

#class
class Gear
  attr_reader :cog
  def set_cog(cog)
    @cog = cog
  end
end


# example spec
it "sets the value of @cog" do
  gear = Gear.new
  gear.set_cog(1)
  expect(gear.cog).to eq(1)
end

So this is simple because it just sets the value of the instance variable so the side effects are obvious. But what if my method calls another command message? For example:

class Gear
    attr_reader :cog, :foo, :bar
    def set_cog(cog)
      reset_other_attributes
      @cog = cog
    end

  def reset_other_attributes
    @foo = nil
    @bar = nil
  end

end

How should I test that? I'm thinking that it should be treated like an outgoing command message, where you should assert that that message is sent and have a separate test for the reset_other_attributes method.

it "calls the reset_other_attributes method" do
  gear = Gear.new
  gear.should_receive(:reset_other_attributes)
  gear.set_cog(1)
end

Is this correct?

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1  
Good question, bad example. Right now your set_cog method is more complex than it has to be. Resetting other attributes seems to be its alternate responsibility, besides the primary one. Multiple responsibilities is bad, m'kay? Can you provide a more real-life example? –  Sergio Tulentsev Feb 18 at 15:17
1  
Also "4. Command messages sent to self: Don't test them" –  Sergio Tulentsev Feb 18 at 15:18
    
@SergioTulentsev yeh but that is talking about private messages. What if reset_other_attributes was public and also called elsewhere in the app. I made the example up on the fly, so it's just meant to be used theoretically. –  Edmund Feb 18 at 15:23
    
@Edmund If reset_other_attributes is public then I think you hit the nail on the head with "you should assert that that message is sent and have a separate test for the reset_other_attributes method." –  Jordan Feb 18 at 15:25
    
Great, thanks @Jordan –  Edmund Feb 18 at 15:26

2 Answers 2

The real reason why this method is hard to test is the fact that it violates the SRP principle. It is setting more than the value of cog.

Anyway, in this case I would test that the expected changes take effect, it doesn't seem reasonable to test that the "reset_other_attributes" method is called. From this snipped, it looks like "reset_other_attributes" shouldn't even be part of the public API.

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Sorry it was a bad example I just made up on the fly –  Edmund Feb 18 at 16:46

Setting methods generally should have no hidden side effects.

That is, if given method represent PROCESS, and its understood that that process involve A, B, and C its OK to make single gobled function that mix and match.

And You MUST test all the results (eg. that A was set, B was executed, and C was logged).

But it may be that function actually do two unrelated things. That's bad. Users may forget about this or that side effect and nasty bug just started its life.

Then do write test, like for normal function. Then refactor into two distinct functions.

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