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The below code works fine:

ListControl lstMyControl;

if (SomeVariable == SomeEnum.Value1)
{
   lstMyControl = new DropDownList();
}
else
{
   lstMyControl = new RadioButtonList();
}

lstMyControl.CssClass = "SomeClass";

Whereas the below code won't compile:

ListControl lstMyControl;

    switch (SomeVariable)
    {
       case SomeEnum.Value1:
       lstMyControl = new DropDownList();
       break;
       case default:
       lstMyControl = new RadioButtonList();
       break;
    }

lstMyControl.CssClass = "SomeClass";

In the second example the compiler says that i am trying to set a property on a variable that has not been instantiated. In either case lstMyControl must be instantiated, but the compilr can't seem to follow that code paths through the switch statement to see that. In the above simple example i would just use if/else. But there are a few times when I have wanted to do something like this with 10 different classes that all inherit from the same base class and having a 10 if/elseif statements is annoying when a switch statement is what i should be using.

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Looking forward answer there... Java wouldn't get bitten that way... And I would have expected C# wouldn't either. –  Romain Feb 2 '10 at 16:41
    
if (SomeVariable = SomeEnum.Value1) <-- You're sure this shouldn't be a comparison instead? if (SomeVariable == SomeEnum.Value1) –  Michael Stum Feb 2 '10 at 16:42
3  
I find that in your second example (as written), the compiler actually says Syntax error, '(' expected on the line where you have case default:. Correct this to default: and presto, everything works. –  AakashM Feb 2 '10 at 16:52
    
lstMyControl = new RadioButtonList; in both examples should be lstMyControl = new RadioButtonList(); –  David Glass Feb 2 '10 at 17:01
1  
A switch is never "what you should be using" :) simpleprogrammer.com/2010/08/17/… –  codeConcussion Jun 16 '11 at 16:44
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2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted
ListControl lstMyControl;

    switch (SomeVariable)
    {
       case SomeEnum.Value1:
       lstMyControl = new DropDownList();
       break;
       default: //Don't prefix with "case"
       lstMyControl = new RadioButtonList();
       break;
    }

lstMyControl.CssClass = "SomeClass";
share|improve this answer
    
@JeffH, yea, just compiled that code and it works for me. I couldn't remember if C# treated case default the same as default. I would have imagined C# would trigger a compiler error at case default really. –  Earlz Feb 2 '10 at 16:47
    
it does create a compiler error, "Syntax error,'(' expected" it gets a bit confused about the context in which 'default' is being used –  Adrian Feb 2 '10 at 16:51
    
Wow, yup it does. I wonder what the OP is talking about then? –  Earlz Feb 2 '10 at 16:52
    
As noted there are other issues with the code posted in the OP –  Adrian Feb 2 '10 at 16:54
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It works as long as you don't prefix "default" with "case" (as Earlz says above). This snippet compiles fine. I'm confused by the error message you're seeing though, removing the "case" gives me a syntax error which is not what you're seeing. Is there something else going on?

ListControl lstMyControl;

int switchVar = 0;
switch (switchVar)
{
    case 1:
        lstMyControl = new DropDownList();
        break;
    default:
        lstMyControl = new RadioButtonList();
        break;
}

lstMyControl.CssClass = "SomeClass";
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