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What I'm trying to do is remove the drop down arrow from a select with this CSS:

.Gender:first-child::-ms-expand {
    display: none;
}

The select element is disabled and its content is set programmatically. It is still a select because of our "unique" roll-your-own binding approach that would be a huge overhaul to replace/update.

Basically I have a section to input basic information for a dynamic number of people. The first instance is always the Primary instance and it's data comes from another section of the page so it's disabled here and bound to the values in that other form. Every other entry after it is editable. The idea was to remove the drop down arrow from the first selects because they're read only. I know that even though the drop down arrow is missing that the select continues to work but I still want it to be there for every other select that isn't disabled.

I know it works in a simplified JSFiddle but in my site ALL selects that have those classes are hiding their drop down arrow. What can I look for in my site that would circumvent the :first-child pseudo class? Why could it possibly work in the fiddle but not in the actual site?

Everything I'm reading says to check your doctype. Mine is <!DOCTYPE html public "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//en">. Nobody that I found ever explicitly says the exact doctype to use, so this may not be 100% correct.

Also, this only needs to work in IE10, it's an internal web app that'll never be run anywhere else.

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You cannot use 'nth on a class...only elements. Oh, and you can't apply two pseudo classes as the same time (AFAIK). –  Paulie_D Feb 18 at 15:48
1  
@Paulie_D don't think that's accurate, as you can see in this fiddle: jsfiddle.net/XtvLW. –  dward Feb 18 at 15:51
    
That's not selecting the .text classes...it's selecting elements. Try changing one of the classes with something else and it will break. jsfiddle.net/XtvLW/3 –  Paulie_D Feb 18 at 15:52
    
Like this fiddle? It seems to be working just fine: jsfiddle.net/XtvLW/4 –  dward Feb 18 at 15:54
1  
I guess I'm not getting something @Paulie_D... Because both the fiddles work, using a div.class and a normal element, like p. I see your fiddle, and get that using those pre-chosen selectors (whether its a class or element), that determines how the nth works. However, when using CSS, don't you almost always provide context when applying attributes (like a class, or nested selector sequence like ul > li)? –  dward Feb 18 at 16:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The single most common cause of every instance of a specific element matching :first-child, when only the first of them should match, is if each of those elements actually exists in its own container element. Here's an example:

<div class='parent'>
  <select class='Gender'>
    <option>Male</option>
    <option>Female</option>
  </select>
</div>
<div class='parent'>
  <select class='Gender'>
    <option>Male</option>
    <option>Female</option>
  </select>
</div>
<div class='parent'>
  <select class='Gender'>
    <option>Male</option>
    <option>Female</option>
  </select>
</div>

Here, every .Gender is the first — and only — child of its parent element, .parent. The .parent elements themselves, on the other hand, are siblings of one another, sharing the same parent element (not shown). Depending on what your source looks like, it may be difficult to pinpoint the location of these parent elements within the source, but as long as your markup is valid, they should be somewhere.

If it does turn out to be the problem, fixing it is trivial — just move the :first-child pseudo-class to the appropriate element:

.parent:first-child .Gender::-ms-expand {
    display: none;
}

Updated fiddle

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This. This is my problem. I thought it was the first element of a global search. I didn't realize it was the first in a container. –  Corey Ogburn Feb 19 at 4:36
    
Hence the name "first child" :) Glad I could help. –  BoltClock Feb 19 at 4:38

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