Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to know if I can remove a \n (newline) only if the current line has one ore more keywords from a list; for instance, I want to remove the \n if it contains the words hello or world.

Example:

this is an original
file with lines
containing words like hello
and world
this is the end of the file

And the result would be:

this is an original
file with lines
containing words like hello and world this is the end of the file

I'd like to use sed, or awk and, if needed, grep, wc or whatever commands work for this purpose. I want to be able to do this on a lot of files.

share|improve this question
    
Do you want the desired output to replace the contents of the file? –  glenn jackman Feb 18 '14 at 17:08
    
Yes, I would like to have all changes so that only those lines containing keywords have their \n removed and have the file saved –  Zloy Smiertniy Feb 18 '14 at 17:19
    
Should the last line contain a newline if it contains the keyword? –  potong Feb 18 '14 at 19:30
    
Should only whole words match? E.g., should worlds be considered a match of keyword word, or not? –  mklement0 Feb 18 '14 at 20:05
    
@potong in my case it doesn't matter, whatever is easier, if adding a newline is too much trouble then it doesn't matter –  Zloy Smiertniy Feb 19 '14 at 21:14

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

here is simple one using sed

sed -r ':a;$!{N;ba};s/((hello|world)[^\n]*)\n/\1 /g' file

Explanation

  • :a;$!{N;ba} read whole file into pattern, like this: this is an original\nfile with lines\ncontaining words like hell\ o\nand world\nthis is the end of the file$
  • s/((hello|world)[^\n]*)\n/\1 /g search the key words hello or world and remove the next \n,
  • g command in sed substitute stands to apply the replacement to all matches to the regexp, not just the first.
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for the logic. Though you are missing a space, ...\n/\1 /g' –  jaypal singh Feb 19 '14 at 5:30
1  
Thanks, and updated. –  BMW Feb 19 '14 at 5:39
1  
+1, very clever (though reading the entire file at once may not always be an option). –  mklement0 Feb 19 '14 at 21:26

Using awk you can do:

awk '/hello|world/{printf "%s ", $0; next} 1' file
this is an original
file with lines
containing words like hello and world this is the end of the file
share|improve this answer
1  
+1; it's not clear whether this is a requirement, but it may make sense to only match on word boundaries; Linux: /\<(hello|world)\>/; OSX (incredibly, awk doesn't support word-boundary matching there): /(^|[[:punct:][:space:]])(hello|world)($|[[:punct:][:space:]])/ –  mklement0 Feb 18 '14 at 18:25
    
Thanks but since OP is matching words and words both by word I guess word boundaries aren't needed. –  anubhava Feb 18 '14 at 18:33

A non-regex approach:

awk '
    BEGIN {
        # define the word list
        w["hello"]
        w["world"]
    }
    {
        printf "%s", $0
        for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) 
            if ($i in w) {
                printf " "
                next
            }
        print ""
    }
'

or a perl one-liner

perl -pe 'BEGIN {@w = qw(hello world)} s/\n/ / if grep {$_ ~~ @w} split'

To edit the file in-place, do:

awk '...' filename > tmpfile && mv tmpfile filename
perl -i -pe '...' filename
share|improve this answer
    
How do I add the name of the file I want to do this in? –  Zloy Smiertniy Feb 18 '14 at 17:03
    
Just put it at the end of the command: perl -pe '...' filename –  glenn jackman Feb 18 '14 at 17:08

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r ':a;/^.*(hello|world).*\'\''/M{$bb;N;ba};:b;s/\n/ /g' file

This checks if the last line, of a possible multi-line, contains the required string(s) and if so reads another line until end-of-file or such that the last line does not contain the/those string(s). Newlines are removed and the line printed.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, though not exactly easy to understand; explanation of the M (multi-line) modifier and the \' (end of buffer) assertion (inadvertently obfuscated by the shell's quoting requirements) here: gnu.org/software/sed/manual/sed.html#Addresses –  mklement0 Feb 18 '14 at 20:45
$ awk '{ORS=(/hello|world/?FS:RS)}1' file
this is an original
file with lines
containing words like hello and world this is the end of the file
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, shortest one yet - very clever. –  mklement0 Feb 19 '14 at 21:30
sed -n '
:beg
/hello/ b keep
/world/ b keep
H;s/.*//;x;s/\n/ /g;p;b
: keep
H;s/.*//
$ b beg
' YourFile

a bit harder due to check on current line that may include a previous hello or world already

principle:

on every pattern match, keep the string in hold buffer other wise, load hold buffer and remove \n (use of swap and empty the current line due to limited buffer operation available) and print the content Add a special case of pattern in last line (normaly hold so not printed otherwise)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.