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In fx Javascript you got the "OR" operator as ∥ but that in math as far as i know is "x ∥ y means x is parallel to y."

So if had an mathematical issue where i could ether minus or plus to get the result and then show its ether one or the other

24 +- 4 = 16∥28 something like that

I wanna find out is there an mathematical "or" operator and does it even make sense to write?

i read trough THIS list dosn't seem to exist so you might know

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or is ||, not this unicode symbol you used –  aoeu Feb 18 at 17:05
    
ty for the fast answer - so its the same in math? –  Simon Pertersen Feb 18 at 17:05
    
Are you aware that JavaScript is a computer language and not a mathematical notation? JavaScript operators mean what the JavaScript authors decide, and it's often influenced by what's easily available in a regular computer keyboard. It's like asking whether jQuery's $ symbol means US dollars or Mexican pesos... –  Álvaro G. Vicario Feb 18 at 17:10
    
im aware - and i just seeked the || operator in math –  Simon Pertersen Feb 18 at 17:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have to write it out. So the question whether this be true: 24 +- 2 = x is:

22 == x || 26 == x

The || is the only mathematical arithmetical or we got. There also exists |, which is the logical or, but that is probably not what you want for this case.

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makes sense same in scripting –  Simon Pertersen Feb 18 at 17:06

Not sure what you're asking, but if you want to know the mathematical notation for these symbols, they're the conjunction operator ∧ (and), the disjunction operator ∨ (or) and the negation operator ¬ (not).

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