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From the answer here.

class wrap {
public:
   operator obj() const & { ... }   //Copy from me.
   operator obj() && { ... }  //Move from me.
private:
   obj data_;
};

I know the && means that the member will be invoked when the object is an rvalue reference. But what does the single ampersand mean? How is it different than without the ampersand?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 24 down vote accepted

It means the member will be invoked when the object is an lvalue reference.

[C++11: 9.3.1/5]: A non-static member function may be declared with a ref-qualifier (8.3.5); see 13.3.1.

[C++11: 13.3.1/4]: For non-static member functions, the type of the implicit object parameter is

  • “lvalue reference to cv X” for functions declared without a ref-qualifier or with the & ref-qualifier
  • “rvalue reference to cv X” for functions declared with the && ref-qualifier

where X is the class of which the function is a member and cv is the cv-qualification on the member function declaration. [..]

(and some more rules that I can't find)

Without a ref-qualifier, the function can always be invoked, regardless of the value category of the object on which you're invoking it:

struct foo
{
    void bar() {}
    void bar1() & {}
    void bar2() && {}
};

int main()
{
    foo().bar();  // (always fine)
    foo().bar1(); // doesn't compile because bar1() requires an lvalue
    foo().bar2();

    foo f;
    f.bar();      // (always fine)
    f.bar1();
    f.bar2();     // doesn't compile because bar2() requires an rvalue
}

Live demo (thanks Praetorian)

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Yeah, but isn't that the default? –  clin18 Feb 18 at 17:34
5  
I'm not confident enough to post an answer because I haven't played much with ref-qualifiers, but I think leaving it out allows the member function to be invoked on an rvalue or lvalue, while adding it restricts invocation to the corresponding value category. coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/9ae326e4f2a8ae31 –  Praetorian Feb 18 at 17:42
    
@Praetorian: ....... ah. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 18 at 17:44
7  
@clin18 You cannot overload a function with a ref-qualifier with a function that's without it. You either have both or none. –  jrok Feb 18 at 17:46
1  
Dang it, missed out on some repz! I'm glad to see you modified my nonsense comments in the example :) –  Praetorian Feb 18 at 17:49

But what does the single ampersand mean?

The function can only be called on an lvalue, not on an rvalue.

How is it different than without the ampersand?

Without a ref-qualifier you can invoke the function on an lvalue or an rvalue.

With a ref-qualifier you can only call the function on the corresponding value category.

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2  
Probably the best and clearest answer; +1 –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 18 at 17:52

A function without a ref-qualifier can be called for both rvalue and lvalues. A function with a && ref-qualifier can only be called for rvalues. A function with a & ref-qualifier can only be called for lvalues.

class No { void foo(); };
class L { void foo() &; };
class R { void foo() &&; };

No().foo(); // valid
No no; no.foo(); // valid
L().foo(); // invalid
L l; l.foo(); // valid
R().foo(); // valid
R r; r.foo(); // invalid

Unfortunately, I can only find this rule in 5.5/6, which applies only to pointer-to-member dereference expressions. I know it applies otherwise too.

Furthermore, you cannot overload on ref-qualifier vs no ref-qualifier, see 13.1/2 bullet 3. You can overload on & vs &&.

(And due to my fruitless search of the standard, LRiO's answer now has all that info too.)

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I gave up finding a decent quote for it too >.< +1 –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 18 at 17:51
    
[over.match.funcs] p4 determines the implicit obejct parameter, which affects which (if any) overload is viable –  Jonathan Wakely Feb 18 at 17:54
1  
Right, by p4, neither & nor no qualifier match rvalues. p5 then contains a special exception that no qualifier may bind to an rvalue. –  Sebastian Redl Feb 18 at 18:35

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