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>>>seq = ("a", "b", "c") # This is sequence of strings.
str.join( "-",seq )
SyntaxError: multiple statements found while compiling a single statement

What went wrong here? I tried to change " by ' but it doesn't help...

>>> seq = ("a", "b", "c") 
my_string = "-"
str.join(my_string, seq)
SyntaxError: multiple statements found while compiling a single statement

why?????

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3  
Are you entering this in the interactive interpreter? It looks like somehow the line break between your two lines of code isn't being seen. –  BrenBarn Feb 18 at 18:56
1  
As Aaron Hall's answer explains, when you do str="-" what you're doing is overwriting the Python default str(), which breaks everything ever. It's the same reason you're STRONGLY recommended never to do list = [] or dict = [] and etc etc. –  Adam Smith Feb 18 at 19:02
    
how to fix this? how it suppose to be written? –  user7777777 Feb 18 at 19:03
1  
@user7777777 Also, the reason for your SyntaxError is unrelated to you trying to do str= or even str.join. You can't paste multiple lines at once into an interactive interpreter like IDLE. One line at a time :). The interpreter sees more than one line at once, and threw the SyntaxError at you to tell you to slow down. –  Adam Smith Feb 18 at 19:10
1  
This may be a dumb question. After you type seq = ("a", "b", "c") , are you pressing enter before typing str.join( "-",seq )? –  Kevin Feb 18 at 19:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It can be done even easier, as the object on which is method called is passed as the first argument, so writing

seq = ("a", "b", "c") 
my_string = '-'
print my_string.join(seq)

gives

'a-b-c'

as expected

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The problem in your SPECIFIC instance appears to be that you're pasting multiple lines into an interactive interpreter and trying to get them all to parse at once. IDLE (et. al) doesn't like that very much. Do them separately, as in your first example:

>>> seq = ("a","b","c")
>>> str.join("-", seq)
# "a-b-c"

When you did str = "-", str.join(seq) would still work because it's equivalent to my_string.join(seq) as noted above, but using the "long-version" (str.join(separator, sequence)) doesn't work.

If you want to paste a longer line in a Python shell, it's customary to separate by ;, but please don't stick these sorts of lines in Python files. I frequently do this to give people reproducible results via email:

seq = ("a", "b", "c"); my_string = '-'; my_string.join(seq)

An earlier issue was overwriting the str constructor. Start a new shell and try this:

seq = ("a", "b", "c") 
my_string = '-'
str.join(my_string, seq)

you should get this:

'a-b-c'

It is more common to use join as an instance method:

my_string.join(seq)
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1  
There it is! Thank you for seeing what I was struggling to find.... –  Adam Smith Feb 18 at 19:01
5  
Yes, but that won't raise SyntaxError. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Feb 18 at 19:01
1  
(This also isn't the case in the first posted code .. but it is indeed a problem that arises occasionally.) –  user2864740 Feb 18 at 19:02
1  
Entering del str will also bring back the builtin –  wnnmaw Feb 18 at 19:03
1  
@adsmith It still shouldn't be a SyntaxError though.. seq = ("a", "b", "c"); str='-'; str.join( "-",(seq )) results in "TypeError: join() takes exactly 1 argument (2 given)" –  user2864740 Feb 18 at 19:04

join is a method of the str data type so you can do...

>>> seq = ("a", "b", "c")
>>> "-".join(seq)
'a-b-c'
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Once you have: seq = ("a","b","c")

You can your one of these to syntax (They are actually identical, the latter is more canonical):

>>> str.join("-",seq)
'a-b-c'

>>> "-".join(seq)
'a-b-c'
share|improve this answer
    
still it shows syntaxerror –  user7777777 Feb 18 at 19:15

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