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I have the following code that I use to normalize a char array. At the end of the process, the normalized file has some of the old output leftover at the end. This is do to i reaching the end of the array before j. This makes sense but how do I remove the extra characters? I am coming from java so I apologize if I'm making mistakes that seem simple. I have the following code:

/* The normalize procedure normalizes a character array of size len 
   according to the following rules:
     1) turn all upper case letters into lower case ones
     2) turn any white-space character into a space character and, 
        shrink any n>1 consecutive whitespace characters to exactly 1 whitespace

     When the procedure returns, the character array buf contains the newly 
     normalized string and the return value is the new length of the normalized string.

     hint: you may want to use C library function isupper, isspace, tolower
     do "man isupper"
*/
int
normalize(unsigned char *buf,   /* The character array contains the string to be normalized*/
                    int len     /* the size of the original character array */)
{
    /* use a for loop to cycle through each character and the built in c funstions to analyze it */
    int i = 0;
    int j = 0;
    int k = len;

    if(isspace(buf[0])){
        i++;
        k--;
    }
    if(isspace(buf[len-1])){
        i++;
        k--;
    }
    for(i;i < len;i++){
        if(islower(buf[i])) {
            buf[j]=buf[i];
            j++;
        }
        if(isupper(buf[i])) {
            buf[j]=tolower(buf[i]);
            j++;
        }
        if(isspace(buf[i]) && !isspace(buf[j-1])) {
            buf[j]=' ';
            j++;
        }
        if(isspace(buf[i]) && isspace(buf[i+1])){
            i++;
            k--;
        }
    }

   return k;

}

Here is some sample output:

halb mwqcnfuokuqhuhy ja mdqu nzskzkdkywqsfbs zwb lyvli HALB MwQcnfuOKuQhuhy Ja mDQU nZSkZkDkYWqsfBS ZWb lyVLi

As you can see the end part is repeating. Both the new normalized data and old remaining un-normalized data is present in the result. How can I fix this?

share|improve this question
    
Seeing (a) a sample input, (b) the corresponding sample output, (c) the correct sample output, and (d) all with about 1/10th the data presented here that still produces the same problem would be highly desirable. It would also be much easier for you to debug if you had all-of-the-above at your disposal. –  WhozCraig Feb 18 at 23:31
    
@WhozCraig I edited the output to be shorter so it is easier to see the problem. After the normalized part the non-normalized part repeats. –  Lesha Feb 18 at 23:38
    
Thank you. Just out of curiosity, when this assignment was given out, were you studying pointers and their many uses, because can be somewhat an exercise in walking two of them down your buffer. Just curious. –  WhozCraig Feb 18 at 23:44
    
@WhozCraig We studied pointers a few weeks before this assignment was given out. While using pointers is somewhat part of the assignment that is not the purpose of the assignment. –  Lesha Feb 18 at 23:47
1  
Regarding your problem, it may be as simple as the assignment parameters themselves. It says nothing about terminating the string (i.e. setting a nulchar terminator); it simply says return the finalized length when done. In fact, there is no guarantees the input is terminated; why should the output be so? Put simply, your code may already be correct and your simply displaying the results incorrectly. That portion of the assignment is decidedly lacking imho. –  WhozCraig Feb 18 at 23:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

add a null terminator

k[newLength]='\0';
return k;
share|improve this answer
    
I believe you meant buf[j+1] = '\0' This does seem to accomplish a goal but adds an extra character to the end of the array (upon print out there is an X at the end). Did I add the pointer incorrectly? –  Lesha Feb 18 at 23:49
    
Note: if the buffer passed is not a terminated string and the last char in the buffer is not a double-whitespace suffix, this can invoke UB. –  WhozCraig Feb 19 at 0:29
    
@WhozCraig what is a double white space suffix? not a quiz, just curious... –  Grady Player Feb 19 at 3:48
    
It means if a packed buffer with no whitespace and ending in anything besides two whitespace chars (therefore the latter one being trimmed) will cause you to write to buf[len] for the terminator. The addressable region is buf[0...(len-1)]. That the length was passed to this function is no accident. There is nothing in assignment about anything being terminated. I honestly think the problem was in the reporting code, not the algorithm (though i didn't review the algorithm closely, admittedly). See my link in general comment for what i mean. –  WhozCraig Feb 19 at 4:07
    
I am confused... I an not familiar with any domain requiring 2 white space chars aside from some formats. http headers etc.. what is the danger if copying the string "dog" into a char[4] buffer –  Grady Player Feb 19 at 4:17

to fix like this

int normalize(unsigned char *buf, int len) {
    int i, j;

    for(j=i=0 ;i < len; ++i){
        if(isupper(buf[i])) {
            buf[j++]=tolower(buf[i]);
            continue ;
        }
        if(isspace(buf[i])){
            if(!j || j && buf[j-1] != ' ')
                buf[j++]=' ';
            continue ;
        }
        buf[j++] = buf[i];
    }
    buf[j] = '\0';

    return j;
}
share|improve this answer

or? add a null terminator

    k[newLength] = NULL;
    return k;
share|improve this answer

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