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I have a client connect() to a server, and when idle, it times out after a couple hours. I added setsockopt(socket, SOL_SOCKET, SO_KEEPALIVE...) with 1 sec but it didnt make a difference. Any clues on why keepalive wouldnt work? Would it make a difference if I used SOL_TCP instead of SOL_SOCKET? This is on Linux.

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Define 'times out after a couple of hours'. What is the exact symptom of that? – EJP Feb 18 '14 at 23:27
    
errno 110 - Connection timed out. I did a tcpdump and dont see keepalive messages – excalibur Feb 19 '14 at 16:43
int val = 1;
setsockopt(socket, SOL_SOCKET, SO_KEEPALIVE, &val, sizeof val)

Just enables keepalives. You will get the default timers for keepalive probes, which you can view with the command:

sysctl net.ipv4.tcp_keepalive_time

Normally the default is couple of hours.

If you want to change the default timers, you could use this:

struct KeepConfig cfg = { 60, 5, 5};
set_tcp_keepalive_cfg(fd, &cfg);

With the helper functions here:

struct KeepConfig {
    /** The time (in seconds) the connection needs to remain 
     * idle before TCP starts sending keepalive probes (TCP_KEEPIDLE socket option)
     */
    int keepidle;
    /** The maximum number of keepalive probes TCP should 
     * send before dropping the connection. (TCP_KEEPCNT socket option)
     */
    int keepcnt;

    /** The time (in seconds) between individual keepalive probes.
     *  (TCP_KEEPINTVL socket option)
     */
    int keepintvl;
};

/**
* enable TCP keepalive on the socket
* @param fd file descriptor
* @return 0 on success -1 on failure
*/
int set_tcp_keepalive(int sockfd)
{
    int optval = 1;

    return setsockopt(sockfd, SOL_SOCKET, SO_KEEPALIVE, &optval, sizeof(optval));
}

/** Set the keepalive options on the socket
* This also enables TCP keepalive on the socket
*
* @param fd file descriptor
* @param fd file descriptor
* @return 0 on success -1 on failure
*/
int set_tcp_keepalive_cfg(int sockfd, const struct KeepConfig *cfg)
{
    int rc;

    //first turn on keepalive
    rc = set_tcp_keepalive(sockfd);
    if (rc != 0) {
        return rc;
    }

    //set the keepalive options
    rc = setsockopt(sockfd, IPPROTO_TCP, TCP_KEEPCNT, &cfg->keepcnt, sizeof cfg->keepcnt);
    if (rc != 0) {
        return rc;
    }

    rc = setsockopt(sockfd, IPPROTO_TCP, TCP_KEEPIDLE, &cfg->keepidle, sizeof cfg->keepidle);
    if (rc != 0) {
        return rc;
    }

    rc = setsockopt(sockfd, IPPROTO_TCP, TCP_KEEPINTVL, &cfg->keepintvl, sizeof cfg->keepintvl);
    if (rc != 0) {
        return rc;
    }

    return 0;
}
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Thats what I was looking for. Thank you – excalibur Feb 19 '14 at 18:31
    
Thanks a lot. It saved my day. Is there any prescribed timeout for a "chatting" like app? Will be helpful, if you describe what these methods do internally? Do they send 0 payload packets to server socket? Is this expensive operation (e.g. may be a new thread is created)? BTW, @excalibur, you should accept this answer by clicking right tick mark below the votes, if you satisfied. – iammilind May 26 at 10:28

Despite its name, keep-alive is not about keeping connection alive, it is about exchanging packets periodically to make sure that there is a network path between peers. It kills connections that would survive extended network outages while idle.

Due to this behavior, keep-alive should not be used unless there is good reason, like telnet or SSH connections where it is reasonable to kill the session when client gets out of touch.

Most probably it is the server that is closing connection after n hours regardless of keepalive usage, due to some connection handling policy.

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No. Server is not closing it. The connection only times out when its idle. The purpose of the keepalive is to make it seem "non-idle" - and that is what didnt work – excalibur Feb 19 '14 at 16:42
    
Perhaps some intermediate router/firewall/NAT established a connection timeout. In Linux, a common NAT timeout was 1 hour (3600 seconds). – epx Feb 19 '14 at 21:13
    
When a network intermediary like a firewall/NAT decides to kill an idle connection, it will (in majority of the cases) simply eliminate it without notifying the connecting peers that the connection is gone (no FIN packet, for example). As a result, from the peers point of view, the connections are alive and the only way they can find out that the socket has gone is by using a read timeout. With the keepalive mechanism, the TCP/IP stack would detect the disconnect and so the application will be notified of the disconnection much earlier (if the idle time settings are lowered appropriately). – Dror Harari Jun 30 at 10:59

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