Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I allow users to enter a regular expression to match IP addresses, for doing an IP filtration in a related system. I would like to validate if the entered regular expressions are valid as a lot of userse will mess op, with good intentions though.

I can of course do a Regex.IsMatch() inside a try/catch and see if it blows up that way, but are there any smarter ways of doing it? Speed is not an issue as such, I just prefer to avoid throwing exceptions for no reason.

share|improve this question
    
do you mean blowing up on creating the actual Regex? new regex(str) ? –  Nicholas Mancuso Oct 20 '08 at 14:52
    
Allowing the users to enter a start and end value for each octet (or a similar solution) might be worth considering instead of regex. –  Greg Oct 20 '08 at 14:56
    
You might also consider using CIDR (192.168.0.0/24) if your IP address regex is for ranges. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CIDR –  Richard Szalay Nov 21 '09 at 10:07

8 Answers 8

up vote 27 down vote accepted

As long as you catch very specific exceptions, just do the try/catch.

Exceptions are not evil if used correctly.

share|improve this answer
3  
Apart from the performance implications unfortunately (scenario-specific, I know), and the disruption to debugging when the exception type is very general (ArgumentException is terrible for this). I'd love to see Regex.TryParse() introduced into .NET someday :) –  Nicholas Blumhardt Feb 22 '14 at 6:01

I think exceptions are OK in this case.

Here's what I put together:

private static bool IsValidRegex(string pattern)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(pattern)) return false;

    try
    {
        Regex.Match("", pattern);
    }
    catch (ArgumentException)
    {
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I wonder will JIT compiler be smart or dumb enough to optimize away the whole try catch block because the return value of a pure function is not used? –  deerchao Nov 23 '13 at 16:44

Not without a lot of work. Regex parsing can be pretty involved, and there's nothing public in the Framework to validate an expression.

System.Text.RegularExpressions.RegexNode.ScanRegex() looks to be the main function responsible for parsing an expression, but it's internal (and throws exceptions for any invalid syntax anyway). So you'd be required to reimplement the parse functionality - which would undoubtedly fail on edge cases or Framework updates.

I think just catching the ArgumentException is as good an idea as you're likely to have in this situation.

share|improve this answer

A malformed regex isn't the worst of reasons for an exception.

Unless you resign to a very limited subset of regex syntax - and then write a regex (or a parser) for that - I think you have no other way of testing if it is valid but to try to build a state machine from it and make it match something.

share|improve this answer

Depending on who the target is for this, I'd be very careful. It's not hard to construct regexes that can backtrack on themselves and eat a lot of CPU and memory -- they can be an effective Denial of Service vector.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there no "stack overflow" protection in the .NET regex parsing library? Can you give me an example that might give me trouble? –  Mark S. Rasmussen Oct 20 '08 at 20:33
2  
Regex.IsMatch("bbbbbbbbbb", "(.*){50}a"); –  Hound May 9 '12 at 11:46
1  
With .NET 4.5, you can add a timeout value to your Regex object –  Sparky Mar 30 '14 at 14:18

I have a method to test whether a RegEx is valid, but it just wraps the regex in a Try/Catch. I'm not sure if there's a better way to do this, but I couldn't find one.

share|improve this answer

In .NET, unless you write your own regular expression parser (which I would strongly advise against), you're almost certainly going to need to wrap the creation of the new Regex object with a try/catch.

share|improve this answer

By using following method you can check wether your reguler expression is valid or not. here testPattern is the pattern you have to check.

public static bool VerifyRegEx(string testPattern)
{
    bool isValid = true;
    if ((testPattern != null) && (testPattern.Trim().Length > 0))
    {
        try
        {
            Regex.Match("", testPattern);
        }
        catch (ArgumentException)
        {
            // BAD PATTERN: Syntax error
            isValid = false;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        //BAD PATTERN: Pattern is null or blank
        isValid = false;
    }
    return (isValid);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.