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I am looking for a way to pass a parameter by reference. I understand that Java does not pass methods as parameters, however, I would like to get an alternative.

I've been told interfaces are the alternative to passing methods as parameters but I don't understand how an interface can act as a method by reference. If I understand correctly an interface is simply an abstract set of methods that are not defined. I don't want to send an interface that needs to be defined every time because several different methods could call the same method with the same parameters.

What I would like to accomplish is something similar to this:

public void setAllComponents(Component[] myComponentArray, Method myMethod) {
    for (Component leaf : myComponentArray) {
        if (leaf instanceof Container) { //recursive call if Container
            Container node = (Container) leaf;
            setAllComponents(node.getComponents(), myMethod);
        } //end if node
        myMethod(leaf);
    } //end looping through components
}

invoked such as:

setAllComponents(this.getComponents(), changeColor());
setAllComponents(this.getComponents(), changeSize());

Thanks in advance, Mac

share|improve this question
    
right now my solution is to pass an additional parameter and use a switch case inside to select the appropriate method. However, this solution does not lend while to code reuse. –  Mac Feb 2 '10 at 19:29
    
Thanks for all the answers, everyone seems to suggest something similar but Dan Vinton was the first to post. Thanks everyone. –  Mac Feb 2 '10 at 19:44
    
See also this answer stackoverflow.com/a/22933032/1010868 for similar question –  Tomasz Gawel Apr 8 at 15:57
    

9 Answers 9

up vote 90 down vote accepted

Take a look at the command pattern.

// NOTE: code not tested, but I believe this is valid java...
public class CommandExample 
{
    public interface Command 
    {
        public void execute(Object data);
    }

    public class PrintCommand implements Command 
    {
        public void execute(Object data) 
        {
            System.out.println(data.toString());
        }    
    }

    public static void callCommand(Command command, Object data) 
    {
        command.execute(data);
    }

    public static void main(String... args) 
    {
        callCommand(new PrintCommand(), "hello world");
    }
}

Edit: as Pete Kirkham points out, there's another way of doing this using a Visitor. The visitor approach is a little more involved - your nodes all need to be visitor-aware with an acceptVisitor() method - but if you need to traverse a more complex object graph then it's worth examining.

share|improve this answer
    
this is exactly what I am looking for! –  Mac Feb 2 '10 at 19:33
    
@Mac - good! this one comes up again and again in languages without first-class methods as the de-facto way of simulating them, so it's worth remembering. –  Dan Vinton Feb 2 '10 at 19:37
2  
It's the visitor pattern (separate the action of iterating over a collection from the function applied to each member of the collection), not the command pattern (encapsulate the arguments for a method call into an object). You are specifically not encapsulating the argument - it is provided by the iteration part of the visitor pattern. –  Pete Kirkham Feb 3 '10 at 0:59
    
No, you only need the accept method if you're combining visiting with double dispatch. If you have a monomorphic visitor, it's exactly the code you have above. –  Pete Kirkham Feb 4 '10 at 22:14

Use the java.lang.reflect.Method object and call invoke

share|improve this answer
8  
I don't see why not. The question is to pass a method as a parameter and this a very valid way of doing it. This can also be wrapped in to any number of pretty looking pattern to make it look good. And this is as generic as it gets without the need for any special interfaces. –  Vinodh Ramasubramanian Feb 2 '10 at 19:59
    
the answer to "why not?" is type safety (or lack thereof). –  jrharshath Sep 27 '12 at 12:17
1  
Have you type safety in JavaScript f.g.? Type safety is not an argument. –  Donaudampfschifffreizeitfahrt Feb 14 '13 at 13:20
7  
How is type safety not an argument when the language in question holds type safety up as one of its strongest components? Java is a strongly typed language, and that strong typing is one of the reasons you'd pick it over another compiled language. –  Adam Parkin Apr 17 '13 at 21:03
    
So, are you arguing that reflection never be used in a way that violates type safety? Does it seem reasonable that the creators of Java intended this line of thinking with regards to reflection? –  threed May 16 at 20:58

Last time I checked, Java is not capable of natively doing what you want; you have to use 'work-arounds' to get around such limitations. As far as I see it, interfaces ARE an alternative, but not a good alternative. Perhaps whoever told you that was meaning something like this:

public interface ComponentMethod {
  public abstract void PerfromMethod(Container c);
}

public class ChangeColor implements ComponentMethod {
  @Override
  public void PerfromMethod(Container c) {
    // do color change stuff
  }
}

public class ChangeSize implements ComponentMethod {
  @Override
  public void PerfromMethod(Container c) {
    // do color change stuff
  }
}

public void setAllComponents(Component[] myComponentArray, ComponentMethod myMethod) {
    for (Component leaf : myComponentArray) {
        if (leaf instanceof Container) { //recursive call if Container
            Container node = (Container) leaf;
            setAllComponents(node.getComponents(), myMethod);
        } //end if node
        myMethod.PerfromMethod(leaf);
    } //end looping through components
}

Which you'd then invoke with:

setAllComponents(this.getComponents(), new ChangeColor());
setAllComponents(this.getComponents(), new ChangeSize());
share|improve this answer
    
you spelled it out +1 –  Mac Feb 2 '10 at 19:51

First define an Interface with the method you want to pass as a parameter

public interface Callable {
  public void call(int param);
}

Implement a class with the method

class Test implements Callable {
  public void call(int param) {
    System.out.println( param );
  }
}

// Invoke like that

Callable cmd = new Test();

This allows you to pass cmd as parameter and invoke the method call defined in the interface

public invoke( Callable callable ) {
  callable.call( 5 );
}
share|improve this answer

While this is not yet valid for Java 7 and below, I believe that we should look to the future and at least recognize the changes to come in new versions such as Java 8.

Namely, this new version brings lambdas and method references to Java (along with new APIs, which are another valid solution to this problem. While they still require an interface no new objects are created, and extra classfiles need not pollute output directories due to different handling by the JVM.

Both flavors(lambda and method reference) require an interface available with a single method whose signature is used:

public interface NewVersionTest{
    String returnAString(Object oIn, String str);
}

Names of methods will not matter from here on. Where a lambda is accepted, a method reference is as well. For example, to use our signature here:

public static void printOutput(NewVersionTest t, Object o, String s){
    System.out.println(t.returnAString(o, s));
}

This is just a simple interface invocation, up until the lambda1 gets passed:

public static void main(String[] args){
    printOutput( (Object oIn, String sIn) -> {
        System.out.println("Lambda reached!");
        return "lambda return";
    }
    );
}

This will output:

Lambda reached!
lambda return

Method references are similar. Given:

public class HelperClass{
    public static String testOtherSig(Object o, String s){
        return "real static method";
    }
}

and main:

public static void main(String[] args){
    printOutput(HelperClass::testOtherSig);
}

the output would be real static method. Method pointers can be static, instance, non-static with arbitrary instances, and even constructors. For the constructor something akin to ClassName::new would be used.

1 This is not considered a lambda by some, as it has side effects. It does illustrate, however, the use of one in a more straightforward-to-visualize fashion.

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Java do have a mechanism to pass name and call it. It is part of the reflection mechanism. Your function should take additional parameter of class Method.

public void YouMethod(..... Method methodToCall, Object objWithAllMethodsToBeCalled)
{
...
Object retobj = methodToCall.invoke(objWithAllMethodsToBeCalled, arglist);
...
}
share|improve this answer

If you don't need these methods to return something, you could make them return Runnable objects.

private Runnable methodName (final int arg){
    return new Runnable(){
       public void run(){
          // do stuff with arg
       }
    }
}

Then use it like:

private void otherMethodName (Runnable arg){
    arg.run();
}
share|improve this answer

Use the Observer pattern (sometimes also called Listener pattern):

interface ComponentDelegate {
    void doSomething(Component component);
}

public void setAllComponents(Component[] myComponentArray, ComponentDelegate delegate) {
    // ...
    delegate.doSomething(leaf);
}

setAllComponents(this.getComponents(), new ComponentDelegate() {
                                            void doSomething(Component component) {
                                                changeColor(component); // or do directly what you want
                                            }
                                       });

new ComponentDelegate()... declares an anonymous type implementing the interface.

share|improve this answer
5  
This is not the pattern you are looking for. –  Pete Kirkham Feb 3 '10 at 0:54
    
What are you talking about? –  EricSchaefer Feb 3 '10 at 7:04
1  
The observer pattern is about abstracting the ability to respond to a change. The OP wants to abstract the action taken at each item in a collection away from the code iterating over the collection, which is the visitor pattern. –  Pete Kirkham Feb 4 '10 at 22:16
    
The Observer/Listener pattern is actually the same as that Command pattern. They only differ in intention. The observer is about notification while the command is a substitute for first class functions/lambdas. The visitor on the other hand is something completly different. I don't think it can be explained in a couple of sentences so please have a look at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visitor_pattern –  EricSchaefer Feb 6 '10 at 9:44

In Java 8, you can now pass a method more easily using Lambda Expressions. First, some background. A functional interface is an interface that has one and only one abstract method, although it can contain any number of default methods (new in Java 8) and static methods. A lambda expression can quickly implement the abstract method, without all the unnecessary syntax needed if you don't use a lambda expression.

Without lambda expressions:

obj.aMethod(new AFunctionalInterface() {
    @Override
    public boolean anotherMethod(int i)
    {
        return i == 982
    }
});

With lambda expressions:

obj.aMethod(i -> i == 982);

Here is an excerpt from the Java tutorial on Lambda Expressions:

Syntax of Lambda Expressions

A lambda expression consists of the following:

  • A comma-separated list of formal parameters enclosed in parentheses. The CheckPerson.test method contains one parameter, p, which represents an instance of the Person class.

    Note: You can omit the data type of the parameters in a lambda expression. In addition, you can omit the parentheses if there is only one parameter. For example, the following lambda expression is also valid:

    p -> p.getGender() == Person.Sex.MALE 
        && p.getAge() >= 18
        && p.getAge() <= 25
    
  • The arrow token, ->

  • A body, which consists of a single expression or a statement block. This example uses the following expression:

    p.getGender() == Person.Sex.MALE 
        && p.getAge() >= 18
        && p.getAge() <= 25
    

    If you specify a single expression, then the Java runtime evaluates the expression and then returns its value. Alternatively, you can use a return statement:

    p -> {
        return p.getGender() == Person.Sex.MALE
            && p.getAge() >= 18
            && p.getAge() <= 25;
    }
    

    A return statement is not an expression; in a lambda expression, you must enclose statements in braces ({}). However, you do not have to enclose a void method invocation in braces. For example, the following is a valid lambda expression:

    email -> System.out.println(email)
    

Note that a lambda expression looks a lot like a method declaration; you can consider lambda expressions as anonymous methods—methods without a name.


Here is how you can "pass a method" using a lambda expression:

interface I {
    public void myMethod(Component component);
}

class A {
    public void changeColor(Component component) {
        // code here
    }

    public void changeSize(Component component) {
        // code here
    }
}

class B {
    public void setAllComponents(Component[] myComponentArray, I myMethodsInterface) {
        for(Component leaf : myComponentArray) {
            if(leaf instanceof Container) { // recursive call if Container
                Container node = (Container)leaf;
                setAllComponents(node.getComponents(), myMethodInterface);
            } // end if node
            myMethodsInterface.myMethod(leaf);
        } // end looping through components
    }
}

class C {
    A a = new A();
    B b = new B();

    public C() {
        b.setAllComponents(this.getComponents(), component -> a.changeColor(component));
        b.setAllComponents(this.getComponents(), component -> a.changeSize(component));
    }
}

The above example can be shortened even more using the :: operator.

public C() {
    b.setAllComponents(this.getComponents(), a::changeColor(component));
    b.setAllComponents(this.getComponents(), a::changeSize(component));
}

Disclaimer: I cannot run Java 8 on my computer, because it does not support Windows XP. Any of the examples included in this answer may have errors, due to my not being able to test them.

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