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I have a following controller action:

[HttpPost]
public ViewResult DoSomething(MyModel model)
{
  // do something
  return View();
}

MyModel looks like this:

public class MyModel
{
  public string PropertyA {get; set;}
  public IList<int> PropertyB {get; set;}
}

So DefaultModelBinder should bind this without a problem. The only thing is that I want to use special/custom binder for binding PropertyB and I also want to reuse this binder. So I thought that solution would be to put a ModelBinder attribute before the PropertyB which of course doesn't work (ModelBinder attribute is not allowed on a properties). I see two solutions:

1.) To use action parameters instead of model which I don't prefer (the model has a lot of properties...) like this:

public ViewResult DoSomething(string propertyA, [ModelBinder(typeof(MyModelBinder))] propertyB) ...

2.) To create a new type lets say MyCustomType: List and register model binder for this type (this is an option)

Is there any other, third solution? Maybe to create a binder for MyModel, override BindProperty and if the property is "PropertyB" bind the property with my custom binder. Is this possible?

Thanks for your answers...

share|improve this question
up vote 11 down vote accepted

override BindProperty and if the property is "PropertyB" bind the property with my custom binder

That's a good solution, though instead of checking "is PropertyB" you better check for your own custom attributes that define property-level binders, like

[PropertyBinder(typeof(PropertyBBinder))]
public IList<int> PropertyB {get; set;}

You can see an example of BindProperty override here.

share|improve this answer

I actually like your third solution, only, I would make it a generic solution for all ModelBinders, by putting it in a custom binder that inherits from DefaultModelBinder and is configured to be the default model binder for your MVC application.

Then you would make this new DefaultModelBinder automatically bind any property that is decorated with a PropertyBinder attribute, using the type supplied in the parameter.

I got the idea from this excellent article: http://aboutcode.net/2011/03/12/mvc-property-binder.html.

I'll also show you my take on the solution:

My DefaultModelBinder:

namespace MyApp.Web.Mvc
{
    public class DefaultModelBinder : System.Web.Mvc.DefaultModelBinder
    {
        protected override void BindProperty(
            ControllerContext controllerContext, 
            ModelBindingContext bindingContext, 
            PropertyDescriptor propertyDescriptor)
        {
            var propertyBinderAttribute = TryFindPropertyBinderAttribute(propertyDescriptor);
            if (propertyBinderAttribute != null)
            {
                var binder = CreateBinder(propertyBinderAttribute);
                var value = binder.BindModel(controllerContext, bindingContext, propertyDescriptor);
                propertyDescriptor.SetValue(bindingContext.Model, value);
            }
            else // revert to the default behavior.
            {
                base.BindProperty(controllerContext, bindingContext, propertyDescriptor);
            }
        }

        IPropertyBinder CreateBinder(PropertyBinderAttribute propertyBinderAttribute)
        {
            return (IPropertyBinder)DependencyResolver.Current.GetService(propertyBinderAttribute.BinderType);
        }

        PropertyBinderAttribute TryFindPropertyBinderAttribute(PropertyDescriptor propertyDescriptor)
        {
            return propertyDescriptor.Attributes
              .OfType<PropertyBinderAttribute>()
              .FirstOrDefault();
        }
    }
}

My IPropertyBinder interface:

namespace MyApp.Web.Mvc
{
    interface IPropertyBinder
    {
        object BindModel(ControllerContext controllerContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext, MemberDescriptor memberDescriptor);
    }
}

My PropertyBinderAttribute:

namespace MyApp.Web.Mvc
{
    public class PropertyBinderAttribute : Attribute
    {
        public PropertyBinderAttribute(Type binderType)
        {
            BinderType = binderType;
        }

        public Type BinderType { get; private set; }
    }
}

An example of a property binder:

namespace MyApp.Web.Mvc.PropertyBinders
{
    public class TimeSpanBinder : IPropertyBinder
    {
        readonly HttpContextBase _httpContext;

        public TimeSpanBinder(HttpContextBase httpContext)
        {
            _httpContext = httpContext;
        }

        public object BindModel(
            ControllerContext controllerContext,
            ModelBindingContext bindingContext,
            MemberDescriptor memberDescriptor)
        {
            var timeString = _httpContext.Request.Form[memberDescriptor.Name].ToLower();
            var timeParts = timeString.Replace("am", "").Replace("pm", "").Trim().Split(':');
            return
                new TimeSpan(
                    int.Parse(timeParts[0]) + (timeString.Contains("pm") ? 12 : 0),
                    int.Parse(timeParts[1]),
                    0);
        }
    }
}

Example of the above property binder being used:

namespace MyApp.Web.Models
{
    public class MyModel
    {
        [PropertyBinder(typeof(TimeSpanBinder))]
        public TimeSpan InspectionDate { get; set; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I guess this approach can be improved by overriding GetPropertyValue. See my answer for details. – Gebb Nov 1 '13 at 13:26
    
Is it possible to have similar PropertyBinder implementation for Web API ? – mehul9595 May 23 '14 at 6:53

@jonathanconway's answer is great, but I would like to add a minor detail.

It's probably better to override the GetPropertyValue method instead of BindProperty in order to give the validation mechanism of the DefaultBinder a chance to work.

protected override object GetPropertyValue(
    ControllerContext controllerContext,
    ModelBindingContext bindingContext,
    PropertyDescriptor propertyDescriptor,
    IModelBinder propertyBinder)
{
    PropertyBinderAttribute propertyBinderAttribute =
        TryFindPropertyBinderAttribute(propertyDescriptor);
    if (propertyBinderAttribute != null)
    {
        propertyBinder = CreateBinder(propertyBinderAttribute);
    }

    return base.GetPropertyValue(
        controllerContext,
        bindingContext,
        propertyDescriptor,
        propertyBinder);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Depending on your desired usage, this may work for you and it may not. Keep in mind that the GetPropertyValue only fires when an item in the inbound object (in this case, Request form/query string) matches the property. If you wanted a custom model binder that was able to search for elements with a different name, say maybe to populate a Dictionary, you'd be out of luck.For example, mapping "field1=test&field2=ing&field3=now" would map to a dictionary where "1" was the key and "test" was the value. The solution by Jonathan Conway does allow for that. Maybe a hybrid, allowing both is better. – Nick Bork Feb 6 '15 at 17:34

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