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I have a class defined like this:

class MyClass 
{
    int x;
    public: 
        MyClass(int x); 
};

MyClass::MyClass(int x)
{ //Assign x here 
}

However, I can't initialize x in the constructor because it has the same name as an instance variable. Is there any way around this(other than changing the name of the argument)?

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2  
You are making an error. The compiler rightfully complains. Fix your code. –  dirkgently Feb 2 '10 at 19:45
1  
Ummm.. rename the parameter? –  Ed S. Feb 2 '10 at 20:55

9 Answers 9

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The best option is to use the constructor's initializer list:

MyClass::MyClass(int x) : x( x ) { // Body }

But you could also try this approach:

MyClass::MyClass(int x) { this->x = x; }
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1  
Thanks for explaining how to do this the "right" way! –  Mike Feb 2 '10 at 19:42
    
@dirkgently GCC 4.2 doesn't complain about this... any reason that shadowing is bad? –  Mike Feb 2 '10 at 19:46
2  
@dirkgently -- shadowing might not be ideal, but it's valid C++. We could debate shadowing all day long, but what he wanted to know was C++ semantics. –  Naaff Feb 2 '10 at 19:47
5  
Seriously. You could not advice him to use a better name –  Loki Astari Feb 2 '10 at 19:47

However, I can't initialize x in the constructor because it has the same name as an instance variable. Is there any way around this(other than changing the name of the argument)?

So change the name of the parameter!

class MyClass  
{ 
    int x; 
    public:  
        MyClass(int xInitVal);  
}; 

MyClass::MyClass(int xInitVal)
    :x(xInitVal)
{ // Don't assign x here.  
} 

By makeing the parameter name the same as a local you are just making the code hard to read. Don't do it. Nearly every style guide you come across will tell you not to make parameters the same name as members. A small bit of common sense please.

<rant> To all the people that answered:

 this->x = x; 

Don't ask me for a job. My god are you delibrately trying to cause problems.
The fact that it looks horrible is not a give away that this is a bad idea.

Yes it is techncially allowed but the whole point is to make code easy to read and maintain not try and make it an exotic art of decoding the intentions of the previous author.

</rant>

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as an aside - you really should have a naming convention for your member variables that does not clash. This is usually coding rules 1 or 2 for c++ houses. Then when you see m_foo = bar you know exactly what is going on

we use

 int m_thingy;

I have also seen

 int _thingy;
 int thingy_

apologies in advance if you knew this and could not or would not do it

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4  
Best to avoid identifiers that start with "_". –  Bill Feb 2 '10 at 19:55
1  
Ditto to Bill: stackoverflow.com/questions/228783/… –  Loki Astari Feb 2 '10 at 19:58

this->x = x;

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Seriously. You could not advice him to use a better name. And for more complex types that are not int this is the wrong answer anyway. –  Loki Astari Feb 2 '10 at 19:49
    
Yeh, you are right. Better names, no extra initialization, etc. Thanks for pointing this out. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Feb 2 '10 at 20:13

You can use this to explicitly refer to the current object:

this->x = x;
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Seriously. You could not advice him to use a better name. And for more complex types that are not int this is the wrong answer anyway. –  Loki Astari Feb 2 '10 at 19:50
    
How come that people with higher rep are laconically suggesting this->x = x; while people with lower rep are suggesting to rename the parameter? Superior technical knowledge vs common sense? :) –  UncleBens Feb 2 '10 at 20:59

I strongly recommend you just change the variable names. Messing with duplicate identifiers is a fight without a cause.

In my code, I give all function parameters the prefix 'in' ("inValue"). I give all private member variables the prefix 'm' ("mValue").

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Use this->x instead.

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this is a pointer :) –  Nikolai N Fetissov Feb 2 '10 at 19:42
    
this is a pointer in C++. –  Chris Lutz Feb 2 '10 at 19:42
    
this is a pointer, use this->x and not this.x ;) –  machielo Feb 2 '10 at 19:43
    
Well fine then :P –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Feb 2 '10 at 19:43

Use the this pointer

MyClass::MyClass(int x)
{
    this->x = x;
}

Of course not having colliding names like that in the first place would be a better solution.

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I guess this combines the worst of both worlds. There is no need for this->x = x, which is poor form. Also, as Scott Meyers states in his Effective C++ series, "Prefer initialization lists in constructors." –  Thomas Matthews Feb 2 '10 at 21:26

this->x = x isn't working? That's what we did (or used a different parameter name).

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