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Hi I am trying to run the multiprocessing example in the docs: http://docs.python.org/3.4/library/concurrent.futures.html, the one using prime numbers but with a small difference.

I want to be able to call a function with multiple arguments. What I am doing is matching small pieces of text (in a list around 30k long) to a much larger piece of text and return where in the larger string the smaller strings start.

I can do this serially like this:

matchList = []
for pattern in patterns:

    # Approximate pattern matching
    patternStartingPositions = processPattern(pattern, numMismatchesAllowed, transformedText, charToIndex, countMatrix, firstOccurrence, suffixArray)

    # Now add each starting position found onto our master list.
    for startPos in patternStartingPositions:
        matchList.append(startPos)

But I want to do this to speed things up:

matchList = []
with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as executor:
    for pattern, res in zip(patterns, executor.map(processPattern(pattern, numMismatchesAllowed, transformedText, charToIndex, countMatrix, firstOccurrence, suffixArray), patterns)):
        print('%d is starts at: %s' % (pattern, res))

At this stage I've just got the print call there because I can't get the line above, the invocation of the processes to work.

The only real difference between what I want to do and the example code is that my function takes 7 arguments and I have no idea how to do it, spent half the day on it.

The call above generates this error:

UnboundLocalError: local variable 'pattern' referenced before assignment.

Which makes sense.

But then if I leave out that first argument, which is the one that changes with each call, and leave out the first parameter to the processPattern function:

matchList = []
with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as executor:
    for pattern, res in zip(patterns, executor.map(processPattern(numMismatchesAllowed, transformedText, charToIndex, countMatrix, firstOccurrence, suffixArray), patterns)):
        print('%d is starts at: %s' % (pattern, res))

Then I get this error:

TypeError: processPattern() missing 1 required positional argument: 'suffixArray'.

I don't know how to get the pattern argument in the call!

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

To get the data into the right shape, simply use a generator expression (no need for zip at all) and use submit rather than map:

(pattern, executor.submit(processPattern, pattern, ...) for pattern in patterns)

To ensure that everything gets executed on the pool (instead of immediately), do not invoke the processPatterns function as you are doing in your example, but instead pass it in as the first argument to .submit. The fixed version of your code would be:

with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as executor:
    for pattern, res in ((pattern, executor.submit(processPattern, pattern, numMismatchesAllowed, transformedText, charToIndex, countMatrix, firstOccurrence, suffixArray)) for pattern in patterns):
        print('%d is starts at: %s' % (pattern, res.result()))
share|improve this answer
2  
executor.submit returns a future, so you should call .result() to get the value back – Peter Gibson Feb 19 '14 at 4:22
    
@PeterGibson - good point! Thanks for helping make the answer better! – Sean Vieira Feb 19 '14 at 4:23
1  
I'm a Stackoverflow newbie :) I marked this as the correct answer but the code contains a syntax error... the middle line... will see what I can do about it. Lol, sorry everyone and thanks for all the help. – davo36 Feb 19 '14 at 5:26
    
@davo36 - fixed (the generator expression should be creating tuples, but it wasn't). – Sean Vieira Feb 19 '14 at 5:31
    
@Sean Vieera, thanks again mate. That was the fix I had found too. Now the frikkin thing hangs... Another issue. – davo36 Feb 19 '14 at 5:58

Other posters have covered possible solutions, but to explain your error, you should be passing the function and parameters as separate objects to executor.map. Here is the example from the docs

with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as executor:
    # is_prime is the function, PRIMES are the arguments
    for number, prime in zip(PRIMES, executor.map(is_prime, PRIMES)): 
        print('%d is prime: %s' % (number, prime))

Your code is evaluating the processPattern function and passing in the result to executor.map

with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as executor:
    for pattern, res in zip(patterns, executor.map(processPattern(numMis... # <- BAD
        print('%d is starts at: %s' % (pattern, res))

Instead it should be

with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as executor:
    for pattern, res in zip(patterns, executor.map(processPattern, <stuff>)):
        print('%d is starts at: %s' % (pattern, res))

Where <stuff> is an iterable of the arguments to pass to processPattern on each subsequent call.

Or, seeing as the other args stay fixed, create a function that just takes the one parameter you are iterating over and pass in patterns as the iterable (as @uhbif19 suggests)

EDIT:

To expand on how to create the <stuff> iterable, you need an iterable for each argument required by your function (processPattern in this case). You already have patterns as the iterable for argument one, if the others are constant then itertools.repeat may be helpful:

from itertools import repeat
args = (patterns, 
        repeat(numMismatchesAllowed, len(PATTERNS)),
        repeat(transformedText, len(PATTERNS)),
        repeat(charToIndex, len(PATTERNS)),
        <etc...>
        )

Then

for pattern, res in zip(PATTERNS, executor.map(process, *args)):

I include this for the sake of understanding, but you can see how messy this is. The other answers offer better solutions.

EDIT 2:

Here's an example that better illustrates the use of submit vs map

import concurrent.futures

def process(a, b):
    return a.upper() + b

with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as executor:
    for c, fut in [(c, executor.submit(process, c, 'b')) for c in 'testing']:
        print(c, fut.result())

with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as executor:
    for c, res in zip('testing', executor.map(process, 'testing', 'bbbbbbb')):
        print(c, str(res))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that, yes that is bad, but I did try what you say too. The problem was I didn't know what <stuff> would be. I know it's supposed to be an argument list but how do I get the changing 'pattern' argument with the unchanging other 6 arguments on that one line? Using submit, it's easier to break it down I guess. – davo36 Feb 19 '14 at 5:17
    
@davo36 I've updated the answer to explain how to create <stuff> – Peter Gibson Feb 19 '14 at 5:37
    
Right, yes I did consider the approach in Edit 1, but knew there must be a better way. And I can follow the executor.submit example but get a bit confused with the executor.map approach. You're passing 'testing' and 'bbbbbb' as iterables right? So again, not sure how that would translate to actual arguments without doin the repeat thing again. – davo36 Feb 19 '14 at 5:57

Python for-loop is has functional behavior, and it is not possible to change value, which is iterating.

with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as executor:

    def work(pattern):
        return processPattern(pattern, numMismatchesAllowed, transformedText, charToIndex, countMatrix, firstOccurrence, suffixArray)

    results = executor.map(work, patterns)

    for pattern, res in zip(patterns, results):
        print('%d is starts at: %s' % (pattern, res)) 

In fact, for cycle not using continue and break instructions, works just like a map function. That is:

for i in something:
    work(i)

Is equivalent to

map(work, something)
share|improve this answer
    
OK, nice solution to use the intermediary work function. – davo36 Feb 19 '14 at 5:21
    
Unfortunately this solution hangs on my PC... frustrating. – davo36 Feb 19 '14 at 5:46
    
@davo36 Probably it is problem in another your code. Try to change executor.map with ordinary map. Does code still hang? – uhbif19 Feb 19 '14 at 7:57
    
No it doesn't work correctly. It runs, and gets a partially correct answer and terminates normally. I don't know why this happens. I'll spend a bit of time looking into it. Cheers. – davo36 Feb 19 '14 at 20:45
    
Ok, now it works, with just map. But it doesn't execute any of the code when using executor i.e. the processPattern function is not even called. I'm looking into this, even the example from the documentation hangs in certain circumstances. I'm on Windows 8.1, Intel i4770k, Python 3.3. – davo36 Feb 19 '14 at 21:09

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