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I'm working on an application with a shared object that is accessed via a singleton. It's working fine on 32-bit however on 64-bit it doesn't appear to be locking properly. In the constructor for my object I have code that checks for some config reg keys and prompts the user if they don't exist. On 32 bit I see the prompt only once as expected however on 64 bit the prompt is being displayed multiple times. My code is below:

    private static readonly object padlock = new object();
    private static MyClass _instance = null;
    public static MyClass Instance
    {
        get
        {

            lock (padlock)
            {
                if (_instance == null)
                {
                    _instance = new MyClass();
                }
            }
            return _instance;
        }
    }

Any input is greatly appreciated.

Edited To Include Sample Usage:

    public OtherObject()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        MyClass.Instance.OtherObjectOrSomething = this;

        this.Load += new System.EventHandler<EventArgs>(OtherObject_Load);
    }

Edited Again This is running inside of an Office AddIn. Thus the bitness is determined by the installation of office. I define a parameterless constructor that is private.

Thanks

Removed Slightly Anonimized Constructor

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Is the parameterless constructor marked private? Please show a snippet of the code that you are using to use the instance of the singleton. –  Jason Feb 2 '10 at 20:01
    
Added a snippet to the post. I'm accessing this object from a fair amount of different places however in each instance I am using MyObject.Instance for access. –  Casey Margell Feb 2 '10 at 20:07
    
Does this occur only from within VS? First thing to do with Monitor oddities is to remove all references to the corresponding classes (instances) from the watch and debug windows. VS likes to do things it's own way at times (and will bypass locks too). ... –  MaLio Feb 2 '10 at 20:09
    
@Jason: The code as shown will get a default parameterless constructor provided by the compiler, which will be public. –  Scott Dorman Feb 2 '10 at 20:12
    
@Scott Dorman: First, we are only given a snippet, so you don't know that there is not an explicit parameterless constructor. Second, the default parameterless constructor is public, not private. There's a huge difference in terms of correctness; the former is wrong for the singleton pattern. Third, the OP implies that he is not using the default parameterless constructor as he says "[i]n the constructor for my object I have code that checks for some config reg keys and prompts the user if they don't exist." –  Jason Feb 2 '10 at 20:15

6 Answers 6

In the constructor for my object I have code that checks for some config reg keys and prompts the user if they don't exist.

This is a rather dangerous thing to do in a lazily-loaded static instance. Can you guarantee that the UI thread is always the first one to exercise this code path? I don't know for sure that this is part of your problem, but interacting with the UI inside thread-safe code is rarely a good idea, and I've seen all sorts of weird things happen in differing environments as a result.

Can you move this UI code outside the lazy loading? If this is an Office Add-In then you should have a Startup event to hook, which is guaranteed to only execute once. You don't even need the locking code that way, you can ensure that it's initialized before any other thread ever tries to touch it.

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Your singleton constrains you to one instance per app domain. Any chance the multiples are getting created in multiple app domains? You might look into that.

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I put together an implementation here, but it got downvoted twice for some reason :(

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EDIT: based on some answers and comments, I'll go back to my original answer.

I've done it that way too except I would change the readonly to volatile.

private static volatile object padlock = new object();

The volatile keyword lets the compiler know not to optimize the instruction, which will ensure that the most up to date value is present in the field.

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I don't mean to be rude, so please don't take it that way, but this does not help answer the question. The OP's implementation of the singleton is acceptable; it's correct, thread-safe and simple (as long as the parameterless constructor is marked private). Performance suffers because a lock is taken every time the instance is requested, but whatever. Adding volatile does nothing useful here. Let's focus on understanding what the problem is. –  Jason Feb 2 '10 at 19:59
    
@Jason I didn't mean to say that the volatile will fix the the issue, so I will remove that, but are you saying the the post that I linked to is incorrect about the above method failing under certain ertain multi-processor machines? –  David Glass Feb 2 '10 at 20:05
    
There's one major dif to the blog tho. the lock goes around the if which is kinda the point of the article. The problem with if before lock is that multiple threads might hit the if at the same time before any other locks the syncRoot. in the above case that will not be the case –  Rune FS Feb 2 '10 at 20:06
    
@David Glass: First, the question is about 32-bit machines versus 64-bit machines, not multi-processor machines. If this issue is genuine, it's very likely a CLR/JITter issue. Second, the implementation on that blog is very different than what the OP presented; that double-check locking implementation is well-known to have issues. Again, I must stress that what the OP has is a correct implementation. It's not the best, but it's correct. –  Jason Feb 2 '10 at 20:11
    
I'm certainly not wed to the implementation I have. This is generally how I've done singletons for a long time however I've seem various other implementations floating around. If the use of a nested class will resolve the issue then that's an acceptable answer in my mind. –  Casey Margell Feb 2 '10 at 20:22

It could be something internal to the code in the constructor causing multiple prompts. The view of the registry will be different from a 32-bit process vs. a 64-bit process so they could be responding to the differing external conditions

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For an excellent discussion of the issues with the various singleton implementation patterns, see http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/singleton.html (from Jon Skeet).

As it's written, the biggest issue you have is that the compiler is providing a default parameterless constructor which will be public. You should explicitly create a paramaterless contstructor which is private to prevent this. I don't see anything that looks like it would cause an issue based on platform architecture.

Here is the code that I typically use (on both 32- and 64-bit systems):

public sealed class Singleton
{
   private static volatile Singleton instance;
   private static object syncRoot = new object();

   private Singleton()
   {
      // any code that needs to run to create a valid instance of the object.
   }

   public static Singleton Instance
   {
      get
      {
         if (instance == null)
         {
            lock(syncRoot)
            {
               if (instance == null)
               {
                  instance = new Singleton();
               }
            }
         }

         return instance;
      }
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry, but same comment that I gave to David Glass above (stackoverflow.com/questions/2187090/…): this does not help answer the question. –  Jason Feb 2 '10 at 20:13
    
@Jason: See my updates. I suspect that the root of the problem being seen is an implementation that isn't completely correct. The architecture (32- or 64-bit) should have no bearing on how the thread locking behaves, but how the locking code in the singleton is implemented absolutely will. Implementing the private instance variable as volatile does have an impact on memory access. –  Scott Dorman Feb 2 '10 at 20:20
    
@Scott Dorman: Yes, I agree very much that it's very likely a faulty implementation in part of the code that we are not being shown. –  Jason Feb 2 '10 at 20:31
    
just a suggestion: stating explicitly that your outer if is only a performance optimazation and has nothing to do with thread-safety might be a good idea since the question can be view as a threading issue thingy –  Rune FS Feb 2 '10 at 20:41
    
@Rune FS: Good point. –  Scott Dorman Feb 2 '10 at 20:43

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