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So, I'm trying to improve some of the operations that .net 4's BigInteger class provide since the operations appear to be quadratic. I've made a rough Karatsuba implementation but it's still slower than I'd expect.

The main problem seems to be that BigInteger provides no simple way to count the number of bits and, so, I have to use BigInteger.Log(..., 2). According to Visual Studio, about 80-90% of the time is spent calculating logarithms.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Numerics;

namespace Test
{
    class Program
    {
        static BigInteger Karatsuba(BigInteger x, BigInteger y)
        {
            int n = (int)Math.Max(BigInteger.Log(x, 2), BigInteger.Log(y, 2));
            if (n <= 10000) return x * y;

            n = ((n+1) / 2);

            BigInteger b = x >> n;
            BigInteger a = x - (b << n);
            BigInteger d = y >> n;
            BigInteger c = y - (d << n);

            BigInteger ac = Karatsuba(a, c);
            BigInteger bd = Karatsuba(b, d);
            BigInteger abcd = Karatsuba(a+b, c+d);

            return ac + ((abcd - ac - bd) << n) + (bd << (2 * n));
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            BigInteger x = BigInteger.One << 500000 - 1;
            BigInteger y = BigInteger.One << 600000 + 1;
            BigInteger z = 0, q;

            Console.WriteLine("Working...");
            DateTime t;

            // Test standard multiplication
            t = DateTime.Now;
            z = x * y;
            Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now - t);

            // Test Karatsuba multiplication
            t = DateTime.Now;
            q = Karatsuba(x, y);
            Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now - t);

            // Check they're equal
            Console.WriteLine(z == q);

            Console.Read();
        }
    }
}

So, what can I do to speed it up?

share|improve this question
1  
Could you give some context on what Karatsuba is? –  Chris Pitman Feb 2 '10 at 19:49
2  
I'm not sure if this will help but maybe you can somehow cast it to a BitArray so that you can count the bits. –  AaronLS Feb 2 '10 at 19:51
    
@aaronls: That is a lot faster, thanks. –  PythonPower Feb 2 '10 at 21:05
2  
@Chris: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karatsuba_algorithm –  Jakub Šturc Feb 6 '10 at 20:48
    
<< has a lower precedence than +/- –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Feb 20 '11 at 5:03
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2 Answers

Why count all of the bits?

In vb I do this:

<Runtime.CompilerServices.Extension()> _
Function BitLength(ByVal n As BigInteger) As Integer
    Dim Data() As Byte = n.ToByteArray
    Dim result As Integer = (Data.Length - 1) * 8
    Dim Msb As Byte = Data(Data.Length - 1)
    While Msb
        result += 1
        Msb >>= 1
    End While
    Return result
End Function

In C# it would be:

public static int BitLength(this BigInteger n)
{
    byte[] Data = n.ToByteArray();
    int result = (Data.Length - 1) * 8;
    byte Msb = Data[Data.Length - 1];
    while (Msb != 0) {
        result += 1;
        Msb >>= 1;
    }
    return result;
}

Finally...

    static BigInteger Karatsuba(BigInteger x, BigInteger y)
    {
        int n = (int)Math.Max(x.BitLength(), y.BitLength());
        if (n <= 10000) return x * y;

        n = ((n+1) / 2);

        BigInteger b = x >> n;
        BigInteger a = x - (b << n);
        BigInteger d = y >> n;
        BigInteger c = y - (d << n);

        BigInteger ac = Karatsuba(a, c);
        BigInteger bd = Karatsuba(b, d);
        BigInteger abcd = Karatsuba(a+b, c+d);

        return ac + ((abcd - ac - bd) << n) + (bd << (2 * n));
    }

Calling the extension method may slow things down so perhaps this would be faster:

int n = (int)Math.Max(BitLength(x), BitLength(y));

FYI: with the bit length method you can also calculate a good approximation of the log much faster than the BigInteger Method.

bits = BitLength(a) - 1;
log_a = (double)i * log(2.0);

As far as accessing the internal UInt32 Array of the BigInteger structure, here is a hack for that.

import the reflection namespace

Private Shared ArrM As MethodInfo
Private Shard Bits As FieldInfo
Shared Sub New()
    ArrM = GetType(System.Numerics.BigInteger).GetMethod("ToUInt32Array", BindingFlags.NonPublic Or BindingFlags.Instance)
    Bits = GetType(System.Numerics.BigInteger).GetMember("_bits", BindingFlags.NonPublic Or BindingFlags.Instance)(0)

End Sub
<Extension()> _
Public Function ToUInt32Array(ByVal Value As System.Numerics.BigInteger) As UInteger()
    Dim Result() As UInteger = ArrM.Invoke(Value, Nothing)
    If Result(Result.Length - 1) = 0 Then
        ReDim Preserve Result(Result.Length - 2)
    End If
    Return Result
End Function

Then you can get the underlying UInteger() of the big integer as

 Dim Data() As UInteger = ToUInt32Array(Value)
 Length = Data.Length 

or Alternately

Dim Data() As UInteger = Value.ToUInt32Array()

Note that _bits fieldinfo can be used to directly access the underlying UInteger() _bits field of the BigInteger structure. This is faster than invoking the ToUInt32Array() method. However, when BigInteger B <= UInteger.MaxValue _bits is nothing. I suspect that as an optimization when a BigInteger fits the size of a 32 bit (machine size) word MS returns performs normal machine word arithmetic using the native data type.

I have also not been able to use the _bits.SetValue(B, Data()) as you normally would be able to using reflection. To work around this I use the BigInteger(bytes() b) constructor which has overhead. In c# you can use unsafe pointer operations to cast a UInteger() to Byte(). Since there are no pointer ops in VB, I use Buffer.BlockCopy. When access the data this way it is important to note that if the MSB of the bytes() array is set, MS interprets it as a Negative number. I would prefer they made a constructor with a separate sign field. The word array is to add an addition 0 byte to make uncheck the MSB

Also, when squaring you can improve even further

 Function KaratsubaSquare(ByVal x As BigInteger)
    Dim n As Integer = BitLength(x) 'Math.Max(BitLength(x), BitLength(y))

    If (n <= KaraCutoff) Then Return x * x
    n = ((n + 1) >> 1)

    Dim b As BigInteger = x >> n
    Dim a As BigInteger = x - (b << n)
    Dim ac As BigInteger = KaratsubaSquare(a)
    Dim bd As BigInteger = KaratsubaSquare(b)
    Dim c As BigInteger = Karatsuba(a, b)
    Return ac + (c << (n + 1)) + (bd << (2 * n))

End Function

This eliminates 2 shifts, 2 additions and 3 subtractions from each recursion of your multiplication algorithm.

share|improve this answer
    
Magnificent work Alexander Higgins! +1 for your answer which helped me in my search for perfect numbers... –  RvdV79 May 8 '13 at 13:05
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The fastest uses a lookup table - 8 bit should be sufficient:

    private UInt32 popcount_fbsd2(UInt32 v) {
        v -= ((v >> 1) & 0x55555555);
        v = (v & 0x33333333) + ((v >> 2) & 0x33333333);
        v = (v + (v >> 4)) & 0x0F0F0F0F;
        v = (v * 0x01010101) >> 24;
        return v;
    }

    static Byte[] lut = new Byte[256];

    void initlut() {
        for (UInt32 i = 0; i < 256; ++i) {
            lut[i] = (Byte)popcount_fbsd2(i);
        }
    }

    UInt32 BitCount3(BigInteger n) {
        Byte[] ba = n.ToByteArray();
        UInt32 bitct = 0;

        foreach (Byte aByte in ba) {
            bitct += lut[aByte];
        }

        return bitct;
    }

However, this isn't too much slower:

    UInt32 BitCount2(BigInteger n) {
        Byte[] ba = n.ToByteArray();
        UInt32[] uia = new UInt32[ba.Length / 4 + 1];

        int j = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < ba.Length-4; i += 4) {
            uia[j++] = BitConverter.ToUInt32(ba, i);
        }

        Byte[] ba2 = new Byte[4];

        for (int i = (ba.Length / 4) * 4, j2 = 0; i < ba.Length; ++i) {
            ba2[j2++] = ba[i];
        }
        uia[j] = BitConverter.ToUInt32(ba2, 0);

        UInt32 bitct = 0;
        foreach (UInt32 aUI in uia) {
            bitct += popcount_fbsd2(aUI);
        }

        return bitct;
    }

Both are much faster than counting a BitArray's set members.

BTW, did you mean to have

BigInteger x = (BigInteger.One << 500000) - 1;
BigInteger y = (BigInteger.One << 600000) + 1;

in your test code?

share|improve this answer
    
You're counting 1-bits, but what the questioner is interested in is counting all bits, i.e., the "length" of the numbers. –  Gareth McCaughan May 12 '13 at 1:33
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