Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

How to combine tuple lists in erlang? I have lists:

L1 = [{k1, 10}, {k2, 20}, {k3, 30}, {k4, 20.9}, {k6, "Hello world"}],

and

L2 = [{k1, 90}, {k2, 210}, {k3, 60}, {k4, 66.9}, {k6, "Hello universe"}],

now I want a combined list as :

L3 = [
       {k1, [10, 90]},
       {k2, [20, 210]},
       {K3, [30, 60]},
       {k4, [20.9, 66.9]},
       {K6, ["Hello world", "Hello universe"]}
     ].
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Something shorter, and the lists don't even have to posses the same keys, and can be unordered:

merge(In1,In2) ->
    Combined = In1 ++ In2,
    Fun      = fun(Key) -> {Key,proplists:get_all_values(Key,Combined)} end,
    lists:map(Fun,proplists:get_keys(Combined)).

Fun could be written directly in the lists:map/2 function, but this makes it readable.

Output, with data from example:

1> test:merge(L1,L2).
[{k1,"\nZ"},
 {k2,[20,210]},
 {k3,[30,60]},
 {k4,[20.9,66.9]},
 {k6,["Hello world","Hello universe"]}]

"\nZ" is because erlang interprets [10,90] as a string (which are, in fact, lists). Don't bother.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you @carlo and Berzemus for suggestions – Laxmikant Gurnalkar Feb 19 '14 at 9:28

There is a nice solution to this one by using the sofs module in the Erlang Standard library. The sofs module describes a DSL for working with mathematical sets. This is one of those situations, where you can utilize it by transforming your data into the SOFS-world, manipulate them inside that world, and then transform them back again outside afterwards.

Note that I did change your L3 a bit, since sofs does not preserve the string order.

-module(z).

-compile(export_all). % Don't do this normally :)

x() ->
    L1 = [{k1, 10}, {k2, 20}, {k3, 30}, {k4, 20.9}, {k6, "Hello world"}],
    L2 = [{k1, 90}, {k2, 210}, {k3, 60}, {k4, 66.9}, {k6, "Hello universe"}],
    L3 = [{k1, [10, 90]},{k2, [20, 210]},{k3, [30, 60]},{k4, [20.9, 66.9]},{k6, ["Hello universe", "Hello world"]}],
    R = sofs:relation(L1 ++ L2),
    F = sofs:relation_to_family(R),
    L3 = sofs:to_external(F),
    ok.
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to be quite intresting! Thanks. Here String Order is not that much important. It's Great! Thanks – Laxmikant Gurnalkar Feb 20 '14 at 5:25
    
That's nice indeed, It never occurred to me to use advanced set operations, perhaps because I'm note very mathematically inclined ;) – Berzemus Feb 20 '14 at 8:34
    
@IGIVECRAPANSWERS - was not familiar about sofs! cool thing. – trex May 27 '15 at 6:25

This technique is called merge join. It is well known in database design.

merge(L1, L2) ->
    merge_(lists:sort(L1), lists:sort(L2)).

merge_([{K, V1}|T1], [{K, V2}|T2]) -> [{K, [V1, V2]}|merge_(T1, T2)];
merge_([], []) -> [].

If there can be different sets of keys in both lists and you are willing to drop those values you can use

merge_([{K, V1}|T1], [{K, V2}|T2]) -> [{K, [V1, V2]}|merge_(T1, T2)];
merge_([{K1, _}|T1], [{K2, _}|_]=L2) when K1 < K2 -> merge_(T1, L2);
merge_(L1, [{_, _}|T2]) -> merge_(L1, T2);`
merge_(_, []) -> [].

Or if you would like store those values in lists

merge_([{K, V1}|T1], [{K, V2}|T2]) -> [{K, [V1, V2]}|merge_(T1, T2)];
merge_([{K1, V1}|T1], [{K2, _}|_]=L2) when K1 < K2 -> [{K1, [V1]}|merge_(T1, L2)];
merge_(L1, [{K2, V2}|T2]) -> [{K2, [V2]}|merge_(L1, T2)];
merge_(L1, []) -> [{K, [V]} || {K, V} <- L1].

You can of course use tail recursive version if you don't mind result in reverse order or you can always use lists:reverse/1

merge(L1, L2) ->
    merge(lists:sort(L1), lists:sort(L2), []).

merge([{K, V1}|T1], [{K, V2}|T2], Acc) -> merge(T1, T2, [{K, [V1, V2]}|Acc]);
merge([], [], Acc) -> Acc. % or lists:reverse(Acc).

Or

merge([{K, V1}|T1], [{K, V2}|T2], Acc) -> merge(T1, T2, [{K, [V1, V2]}|Acc]);
merge([{K1, _}|T1], [{K2, _}|_]=L2, Acc) when K1 < K2 -> merge(T1, L2, Acc);
merge(L1, [{_, _}|T2], Acc) -> merge(L1, T2, Acc);`
merge(_, [], Acc) -> Acc. % or lists:reverse(Acc).

Or

merge([{K, V1}|T1], [{K, V2}|T2], Acc) -> merge(T1, T2, [{K, [V1, V2]}|Acc]);
merge([{K1, V1}|T1], [{K2, _}|_]=L2, Acc) when K1 < K2 -> merge(T1, L2, [{K1, [V1]}|Acc]);
merge(L1, [{K2, V2}|T2], Acc) -> merge(L1, T2, [{K2, [V2]}|Acc]);`
merge([{K1, V1}|T1], [], Acc) -> merge(T1, [], [{K1, [V1]} | Acc]);
merge([], [], Acc) -> Acc. % or lists:reverse(Acc).
% or merge(L1, [], Acc) -> lists:reverse(Acc, [{K, [V]} || {K, V} <- L1]).
% instead of two last clauses.

If there is possibility that one of lists can contain same keys and you are willing collect all values you can consider this

merge(L1, L2) ->
    merge(lists:sort(L1), lists:sort(L2), []).

merge([{K1, _}|_]=L1, {K2, _}|_]=L2, Acc) ->
    K = min(K1, K2),
    {Vs1, T1} = collect(K, L1, []),
    {Vs2, T2} = collect(K, L2, Vs1),
    merge(T1, T2, [{K, Vs2}|Acc]);
merge([{K, _}|_]=L1, [], Acc) ->
    {Vs, T1} = collect(K, L1, []),
    merge(T1, [], [{K, Vs}|Acc]);
merge([], [{K, _}|_]=L2, Acc) ->
    {Vs, T2} = collect(K, L2, []),
    merge([], T2, [{K, Vs}|Acc]);
merge([], [], Acc) -> lists:reverse(Acc).

collect(K, [{K, V}|T], Acc) -> collect(K, T, [V|Acc]);
collect(_, T, Acc) -> {Acc, T}.
share|improve this answer

What happened to lists:zipwith/2?

Assumptions:

  • lists are the same length
  • lists contain the same keys in the same order

lists:zipwith(fun({X, Y}, {X, Z}) -> {X, [Y, Z]} end, L1, L2).

share|improve this answer
    
Very Cool and pretty, In One line. Thanks – Laxmikant Gurnalkar Feb 20 '14 at 5:28

Maybe this is not the best way, but it does what you are trying to achieve.

merge([{A, X}| T1], [{A, Y} | T2], Acc) ->
    New_acc = [{A, [X, Y]} | Acc],
    merge(T1, T2, New_acc);

merge([{A, X} | T1], [{B, Y} | T2], Acc) ->
    New_acc = [{A, [X]}, {B, Y} | Acc],
    merge(T1, T2, New_acc);

merge([], [{B, Y} | T], Acc) ->
    New_acc = [{B, Y} | Acc],
    merge([], T, New_acc);

merge([{A, X} | T], [], Acc) ->
    New_acc = [{A, X} | Acc],
    merge(T, [], New_acc);

merge([], [], Acc) ->
    lists:reverse(Acc).

Edit I'm assuming that the input lists are ordered as in your sample input. If not you can use lists:sort/2 to sort them before merging.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I'll try this suggestion! – Laxmikant Gurnalkar Feb 19 '14 at 8:55
    
I got the result, but not sure why I'm getting \nZ in first tuple: 10> a:combine_lists(). [{k1,"\nZ"}, {k2,[20,210]}, {k3,[30,60]}, {k4,[20.9,66.9]}, {k6,["Hello world","Hello universe"]}]. Pl. Help. Thanks – Laxmikant Gurnalkar Feb 19 '14 at 9:06
    
I'm assuming that the input lists are ordered as in your sample input. @Carlos:Ohh then Sorry, They are not ordered – Laxmikant Gurnalkar Feb 19 '14 at 9:13
2  
Well, you can use lists:keysort/2. – Carlo Feb 19 '14 at 11:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.