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To the default get, post, put and delete methods I added some more getters, some of which are taking parameters.

public class AController
{   
    // GET api/A
    [HttpGet]
    public HttpResponseMessage GetAs() { ... }

    // GET api/A/5
    [HttpGet]
    public HttpResponseMessage GetA(int id) { ... }

    // GET api/A/GetThis
    [HttpGet]
    public HttpResponseMessage GetThis() { ... }

    // GET api/A/GetThat
    [HttpGet]
    public HttpResponseMessage GetThat() { ... }

    // GET api/A/GetMoreInfoAbout/5
    [HttpGet]
    public HttpResponseMessage GetMoreInfoAbout(int id) { ... }

    // PUT api/A
    [HttpPut]
    public HttpResponseMessage PutA(int id, A a) { ... }

    // POST api/A
    [HttpPost]
    public HttpResponseMessage PostA(A a) { ... }

    // DELETA api/A
    [HttpDelete]
    public HttpResponseMessage DeleteA(int id) { ... }
}

What I did up to now is specifying a new route for each method, so my WebApiConfig.cs got blown up and it's getting more and more untransparent with each new controller and method.

I tried this more generic routing:

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "ApiById",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
    defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional },
    constraints: new { id = @"^[0-9]+$" }
);

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "ApiByActionId",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{action}/{id}",
    defaults: null,
    constraints: new { id = @"^[0-9]+$" }
);

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "ApiByAction",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{action}",
    defaults: null
);

/* Default route */
config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "DefaultApi",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
    defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);
  1. Where do I have to put a default such that GET api/A will be matched to GetAs() while POST api/A will match to PostA(A a)?
  2. Same with GET api/A/5.
share|improve this question

I believe you can use Attribute routing here. Please see the link below for more information: http://www.asp.net/web-api/overview/web-api-routing-and-actions/attribute-routing-in-web-api-2

share|improve this answer
    
Although link can be useful, you should put the answer here as changing link would make your answer invalid. – Ean Mar 4 '14 at 2:15

Well, this is not the solution I was looking for actually, but it's still more generic than adding a bunch of routes for each controller manually.

What it does basically is adding two routes for each controller. These route templates cover requests to api/[ControllerName]/{id} and api/[ControllerName]s and delegate them to the corresponding controller action.

foreach (Type t in GetTypesInNamespace(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly(), "MyProject.Controllers")) {
    if (typeof(ApiController).IsAssignableFrom(t)) { // Make sure that this controller class is deriving from api controller
        string controllerName = t.Name.Substring(0, t.Name.LastIndexOf("Controller"));  // Remove Controller postfix from name
        config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
            name: "ApiGet" + controllerName,
            routeTemplate: "api/" + controllerName + "/{id}",
            defaults: new { controller = controllerName, action = "Get" + controllerName },
            constraints: new { id = @"^[0-9]+$", httpMethod = new HttpMethodConstraint(HttpMethod.Get) }
        );

        config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
            name: "ApiGet" + controllerName + "s",
            routeTemplate: "api/" + controllerName + "/{id}",
            defaults: new { controller = controllerName, id = RouteParameter.Optional, action = "Get" + controllerName + "s" },
            constraints: new { httpMethod = new HttpMethodConstraint(HttpMethod.Get) }
        );
    }
}
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