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I am attempting to create the the business and data layers for my big ASP.NET MVC application. As this is the first time for me attempting a project of this scale I am reading some books and trying to take good care at separating things out properly. Usually my applications mix the business logic and data access layers, and multiple business entities are intertwined in the single class (which has confused me a few times when I was trying to figure out where to add things).

Most of what I have been reading is to separate out the business and data layers. This seems all fine and dandy, but I am having trouble visualizing exactly how to do this in some scenarios. For example, let's say I am creating a system that allows admins to add a new product to the system:

public class Product
{ 
   public int Id { get; private set; }
   public string Name { get; set; }
   public decimal Price { get; set; }
}

Then I separate out the data access by creating a repository

public class ProductRepository
{
   public bool Add(Product product);
}

Let's say I want to require a product's name to have at least 4 characters. I can't see how to do this cleanly.

One idea I had was to expand the Name's set property and only set it if it's 4 characters long. However, there is no way for a method that is creating the product to know the name didn't get set except that Product.Name != whatever they passed in.

Another idea I had is to put it in the Add() method in the repository, but then I have my business logic right there with the data logic, which also means if the Add call fails I don't know if it failed for the business logic or because the DAL failed (and it also means I can't test it using mock frameworks).

The only thing I can think of is to put my DAL stuff in a 3rd layer that gets called from the Add() method in the repository, but I don't see this in any of the domain modelling examples in my book or on the web (that I've seen at least). It also adds to the complexity of the domain models when I am not sure it is needed.

Another example is wanting to make sure that a Name is only used by one product. Would this go in the Product class, ProductRepository Add() method, or where?

As a side note, I plan to use NHibernate as my ORM however, to accomplish what I want it (theoretically) shouldn't matter what ORM I am using since TDD should be able to isolate it all.

Thanks in advance!

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Thanks all. Some good stuff. I'm going to use Juri's solution for the SoC (i.e. Entity -> Service Layer -> Data Layer) and combine that with Jay's 3rd answer for validation (I like the flexibility and cleanliness of that solution), and put the AddValidation() calls into the service layer for now until I find a better spot for them. I also ended up putting my AddValidation and IsValid calls into a BaseEntity class. –  KallDrexx Feb 3 '10 at 15:07

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I usually approach this by using a layered architecture. How to do this? You basically have the following (ideally) VS projects:

  • Presentation layer (where the UI stuff resides)
  • Business layer (where the actual business logic resides)
  • Data access layer (where you communicate with your underlying DBMS)

For decoupling all of them I use so-called interface layers s.t. in the end I have

  • Presentation layer (where the UI stuff resides)
  • IBusiness layer (containing the interfaces for the business layer)
  • Business layer (where the actual business logic resides)
  • IDataAccess layer (containing the interfaces for the DAO layer)
  • Data access layer (where you communicate with your underlying DBMS)

This is extremely handy and creates a nicely decoupled architecture. Basically your presentation layer just accesses the interfaces and not the implementations itself. For creating the according instances you should use a Factory or preferably some dependency injection library (Unity is good for .Net apps or alternatively Spring.Net).

How does this impact on your business logic / testability of your app?
It is probably too long to write everything in detail, but if you're concerned about having a well testable design you should absolutely consider dependency injection libraries.

Using NHibernate,...whatever ORM
Having a DAO layer completely separated through the interfaces from the other layers you can use whatever technology behind for accessing your underlying DB. You could directly issue SQL queries or use NHibernate, as you wish. The nice thing is that it is totally independent from the rest of your app. You could event start today by writing SQLs manually and tomorrow exchange your DAO dll with one that uses NHibernate without a single change in your BL or presentation layer.
Moreover testing your BL logic is simple. You may have a class like:

public class ProductsBl : IProductsBL
{

   //this gets injected by some framework
   public IProductsDao ProductsDao { get; set; }

   public void SaveProduct(Product product)
   {
      //do validation against the product object and react appropriately
      ...

      //persist it down if valid
      ProductsDao.PersistProduct(product);
   }

   ...
}

Now you can easily test the validation logic in your SaveProduct(...) method by mocking out the ProductDao in your test case.

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+1: nice answer –  Amirshk Feb 2 '10 at 20:56
    
That makes sense. I already planned to use Castle Winsor for IoC. Thanks. –  KallDrexx Feb 2 '10 at 20:59
    
In your example, where does the Product object live? Also, say you wanted to display all products, wouldn't this Product class need to be accessible in each the presentation, business, and data layers? –  Chris Stewart May 17 '10 at 20:58
    
@Stewart Sorry, didn't see your comment before. The Product object lives in a separate vertical "layer" which crosses all the layers mentioned above. This is because your Product object is your data transport entity. –  Juri Feb 15 '11 at 16:36

Put things like the product name restriction in the domain object, Product, unless you want to allow products with fewer than 4 characters in some scenarios (in this case, you'd apply the 4-character rule at the level of the controller and/or client-side). Remember, your domain objects may be reused by other controllers, actions, internal methods, or even other applications if you share the library. Your validation should be appropriate to the abstraction you are modeling, regardless of application or use case.

Since you are using ASP .NET MVC, you should take advantage of the rich and highly extensible validation APIs included in the framework (search with keywords IDataErrorInfo MVC Validation Application Block DataAnnotations for more). There are lots of ways for the calling method to know that your domain object rejected an argument -- for example, throwing the ArgumentOutOfRangeException.

For the example of ensuring that product names are unique, you would absolutely not put that in Product class, because this requires knowledge of all other Products. This logically belongs at the persistence layer and optionally, the repository. Depending on your use case may warrant a separate service method that verifies that the name does not already exist, but you shouldn't assume that it will still be unique when you later try to persist it (it has to be checked again, because if you validate uniqueness and then keep it around a while longer before persisting, someone else could still persist a record with the same name).

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This is the way I do it:

I keep the validation code in the entity class, which inherits some general Item Interface.

Interface Item {
    bool Validate();
}

Then, in the repository's CRUD functions i call the appropriate Validate function.

This way all the logic paths are validating my values, but i need to look only in one place to see what that validation really is.

Plus, sometimes you use the entities outside the repository scope, for example in a View. So if the validation is separated, each action path can test for validation without asking the repository.

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For restrictions I utilize the partial classes on the DAL and implement the data annotation validators. Quite often, that involves creating custom validators but that works great as it's completely flexible. I've been able to create very complex dependent validations that even hit the database as part of their validity checks.

http://www.asp.net/(S(ywiyuluxr3qb2dfva1z5lgeg))/learn/mvc/tutorial-39-cs.aspx

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In keeping with the SRP (single responsibility principle), you might be better served if the validation is separate from the product's domain logic. Since it's required for data integrity, it should probably be closer to the repository - you just want to be sure that validation is always run without having to give it thought.

In this case you might have a generic interface (e.g. IValidationProvider<T>) that is wired to a concrete implementation through an IoC container or whatever your preference may be.

public abstract Repository<T> {

  IValidationProvider<T> _validationProvider;    

  public ValidationResult Validate( T entity ) {

     return _validationProvider.Validate( entity );
  }

}  

This way you can test your validation separately.

Your repository might look like this:

public ProductRepository : Repository<Product> {
   // ...
   public RepositoryActionResult Add( Product p ) {

      var result = RepositoryResult.Success;
      if( Validate( p ) == ValidationResult.Success ) {
         // Do add..
         return RepositoryActionResult.Success;
      }
      return RepositoryActionResult.Failure;
   }
}

You could go a step further, if you intend on exposing this functionality via an external API, and add a service layer to mediate between the domain objects and the data access. In this case, you move the validation to the service layer and delegate data access to the repository. You may have, IProductService.Add( p ). But this can become a pain to maintain due to all of the thin layers.

My $0.02.

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Another way to accomplish this with loose coupling would be to create validator classes for your entity types, and register them in your IoC, like so:

public interface ValidatorFor<EntityType>
{
    IEnumerable<IDataErrorInfo> errors { get; }
    bool IsValid(EntityType entity);
}

public class ProductValidator : ValidatorFor<Product>
{
    List<IDataErrorInfo> _errors;
    public IEnumerable<IDataErrorInfo> errors 
    { 
        get
        {
            foreach(IDataErrorInfo error in _errors)
                yield return error;
        }
    }
    void AddError(IDataErrorInfo error)
    {
        _errors.Add(error);
    }

    public ProductValidator()
    {
        _errors = new List<IDataErrorInfo>();
    }

    public bool IsValid(Product entity)
    {
        // validate that the name is at least 4 characters;
        // if so, return true;
        // if not, add the error with AddError() and return false
    }
}

Now when it comes time to validate, ask your IoC for a ValidatorFor<Product> and call IsValid().

What happens when you need to change the validation logic, though? Well, you can create a new implementation of ValidatorFor<Product>, and register that in your IoC instead of the old one. If you are adding another criterion, however, you can use a decorator:

public class ProductNameMaxLengthValidatorDecorator : ValidatorFor<Person>
{
    List<IDataErrorInfo> _errors;
    public IEnumerable<IDataErrorInfo> errors 
    { 
        get
        {
            foreach(IDataErrorInfo error in _errors)
                yield return error;
        }
    }
    void AddError(IDataErrorInfo error)
    {
        if(!_errors.Contains(error)) _errors.Add(error);
    }

    ValidatorFor<Person> _inner;

    public ProductNameMaxLengthValidatorDecorator(ValidatorFor<Person> validator)
    {
        _errors = new List<IDataErrorInfo>();
        _inner = validator;
    }

    bool ExceedsMaxLength()
    {
        // validate that the name doesn't exceed the max length;
        // if it does, return false 
    }

    public bool IsValid(Product entity)
    {
        var inner_is_valid = _inner.IsValid();
        var inner_errors = _inner.errors;
        if(inner_errors.Count() > 0)
        {
            foreach(var error in inner_errors) AddError(error);
        }

        bool this_is_valid = ExceedsMaxLength();
        if(!this_is_valid)
        {
            // add the appropriate error using AddError()
        }

        return inner_is_valid && this_is_valid;
    }
}

Update your IoC configuration and you now have a minimum and maximum length validation without opening up any classes for modification. You can chain an arbitrary number of decorators in this way.

Alternatively, you can create many ValidatorFor<Product> implementations for the various properties, and then ask the IoC for all such implementations and run them in a loop.

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Alright, here is my third answer, because there are so very many ways to skin this cat:

public class Product
{
    ... // normal Product stuff

    IList<Action<string, Predicate<StaffInfoViewModel>>> _validations;

    IList<string> _errors; // make sure to initialize
    IEnumerable<string> Errors { get; }

    public void AddValidation(Predicate<Product> test, string message)
    {
        _validations.Add(
            (message,test) => { if(!test(this)) _errors.Add(message); };
    }

    public bool IsValid()
    {
        foreach(var validation in _validations)
        {
            validation();
        }

        return _errors.Count() == 0;
    }
}

With this implementation, you are able to add an arbitrary number of validators to the object without hardcoding the logic into the domain entity. You really need to be using IoC or at least a basic factory for this to make sense, though.

Usage is like:

var product = new Product();
product.AddValidation(p => p.Name.Length >= 4 && p.Name.Length <=20, "Name must be between 4 and 20 characters.");
product.AddValidation(p => !p.Name.Contains("widget"), "Name must not include the word 'widget'.");
product.AddValidation(p => p.Price < 0, "Price must be nonnegative.");
product.AddValidation(p => p.Price > 1, "This is a dollar store, for crying out loud!");
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U can use a other validation system. you can add a method to IService in service layer such as:

IEnumerable<IIssue> Validate(T entity)
{
    if(entity.Id == null)
      yield return new Issue("error message");
}
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