Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can someone please explain the output for following function:

public static void main(String args[]) {
    String str1 = new String("20");
    String str2 = new String("100");
    List<String> list = new ArrayList<>();
    list.add(str1);
    list.add(str2);
    Collections.sort(list);  // list is [100,20] now
}

I hope that the sorting is working in ASCII values for the input, i.e. 49 for 1, 50 for 2 and so on.

Can someone please confirm?

share|improve this question
    
Strings are sorted alphabetically –  Baldrick Feb 19 at 10:23
    
Since '1' is less than '2', no need to continue checking the other digits. –  Maroun Maroun Feb 19 at 10:23
2  

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

So Collections.sort() sorts Lists of Comparable objects, using the compareTo() method that every Comparable object has. For String, the docs describes this as:

Compares two strings lexicographically. The comparison is based on the Unicode value of each character in the strings. The character sequence represented by this String object is compared lexicographically to the character sequence represented by the argument string.

It then goes on to describe lexicographical ordering of two different Strings as being calculated using the following approach:

If two strings are different, then either they have different characters at some index that is a valid index for both strings, or their lengths are different, or both. If they have different characters at one or more index positions, let k be the smallest such index; then the string whose character at position k has the smaller value, as determined by using the < operator, lexicographically precedes the other string. In this case, compareTo returns the difference of the two character values at position k in the two string -- that is, the value:

   this.charAt(k)-anotherString.charAt(k)

If there is no index position at which they differ, then the shorter string lexicographically precedes the longer string. In this case, compareTo returns the difference of the lengths of the strings -- that is, the value:

   this.length()-anotherString.length()
share|improve this answer

Strings are sorted lexicographically, i.e. alphabetically, based on the int value of the chars that form them.

share|improve this answer

When sorting a collection, the compareTo() method, defined in the Comparable interface is used. This means the order in which is sorted is specific to the type of class, in this case java.lang.String.

When you look at the API docs of the compareTo() method from the String class, then you will see it says that:

Compares two strings lexicographically. The comparison is based on the Unicode value of each character in the strings. The character sequence represented by this String object is compared lexicographically to the character sequence represented by the argument string.

So in short terms, it sorted alphabetically, and since 1 comes before 2, it will be first.

If you want to change that order, you can use the Collections.sort() method and also provide a Comparator argument.

share|improve this answer

it compares 1 to 2 at the first so what the result is 2 is bigger so the act of sorting will finish at this time ,

think that you have this two number 110,112

what the result is :

at first it compares 1 to 1 so they are equals , so it go to the next step

again 1 to 1 so go to the next step

here it compares 0 to 2 and here the act of sorting will finish

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.