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I have the following enum with flags:

[Flags]
public enum DataFiat {
  Public = 1,
  Listed = 2,
  Client = 4
} // DataFiat

And I have an int array, for example:

int[] selected = new int[] { 1, 4 }

How can I convert this to my enum which would become:

DataFiat.Public | DataFiat.Client

Thank You, Miguel

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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How about something like

var tt = (DataFiat)selected.Aggregate((i, t) => i | t);
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I think that might be a good solution since it works with new int[] { 1, 3 }; ... Amy I right? –  MDMoura Feb 19 at 12:22
    
Yes, I tested and it worked, producing DataFiat.Public | DataFiat.Listed –  astander Feb 19 at 12:23
    
So help me to understand: why does 1, 3 result in DataFiat.Public | DataFiat.Listed ? –  csteinmueller Feb 19 at 12:38
    
For {1,3} the int value of selected.Aggregate((i, t) => i | t) is 3 which is equal to DataFiat.Public | DataFiat.Listed –  astander Feb 19 at 12:44
    
That's right. But If I suppose that 1, 4 means The Enum flag with value 1 and the Enum flag with value 4 how does 1, 3 fit into this logic? –  csteinmueller Feb 19 at 13:02
var f = (DataFiat)selected.Sum();
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Nice! Thanks ... –  MDMoura Feb 19 at 12:18
1  
This is nice and short but only works if the selected array doesn't contain duplicates or values that are already the result of an or-operation. –  Dirk Feb 19 at 12:18
    
Yes, correct ... If the array is new int[] { 1, 3 } this will not work ... –  MDMoura Feb 19 at 12:21
1  
astanders answer with the aggregate might help (DataFiat)selected.Aggregate((i, t) => i | t); –  stepandohnal Feb 19 at 12:23
DataFlat result = (DataFlat) 0;

foreach (var value in selected)
{
    result |= (DataFlat)value;
}

Or if you want to use LINQ

DataFlat result = (DataFlat) selected.Aggregate(0, (old, current) => old | current);
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this snippet:

        var intArr = new[] { 1, 4 };
        var sum = intArr.Sum(x => x);
        var result = (Test)sum;

returns

enter image description here

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1  
It won't work with array new int[] { 1, 3 } –  MDMoura Feb 19 at 12:21
    
It will. I've tested it right now. –  csteinmueller Feb 19 at 12:22
    
Sure? I tested it and I get Client ... You should get Public because you have 1 and Public | Listed because you have 3 so in the end you should get Public | Listed ... –  MDMoura Feb 19 at 12:25
    
I am talking about new int[] { 1, 3 } and not new int[] { 1, 4 } ... Try it ... –  MDMoura Feb 19 at 12:32

You mean this?

IEnumerable<DataFiat> selectedDataFiats = selected.Cast<DataFiat>();

This sinmply casts each int to DataFiat.

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You can't just cast the array, if it's really an object[]. You can create a new array pretty easily though:

var enumArray = originalArray.Cast<DataFiat>().ToArray();

If it were actually an int[] array to start with, you could cast - although you'd have to talk nicely to the C# compiler first:

using System;

class Program
{
    enum Foo
    {
        Bar = 1,
        Baz = 2
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        int[] ints = new int[] { 1, 2 };
        Foo[] foos = (Foo[]) (object) ints;
        foreach (var foo in foos)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(foo);
        }
    }
}

The C# compiler doesn't believe that there's a conversion from int[] to Foo[] (and there isn't, within the rules of C#)... but the CLR is fine with this conversion, so as long as you can persuade the C# compiler to play along (by casting to object first) it's fine.

This doesn't work when the original array is really an object[] though.

Hope this helps..

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