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First of all sorry if I make grammatical mistakes. I'm not english.

I'm trying to improve the yield loss that is occurring when increasing the number of threads using OpenMP in Fortran.

I'm using two Intel Xeon X5650 (12 physical cores) with 96 Gb of RAM

The best results that I've obtained are the following:

1 proc -> 15.50 sec; 2 proc -> 8.10 sec; 4 proc -> 4.42 sec; 8 proc -> 2.81 sec; 12 proc -> 2.43 sec

Like you see, the improvement decreases the more threads I run.

Here's the code:

allocate(SUM(PUNTOST,PUNTOSP,NUM_DATA,2))
allocate(SUMATORIO(1))
allocate(SUMATORIO(1)%REGION(REGIONS))
DO i=1,REGIONES
    allocate(SUMATORIO(1)%REGION(i)%VALOR(2,PUNTOSP,PUNTOST))
    SUMATORIO(1)%REGION(i)%VALOR= cmplx(0.0,0.0)
END DO
allocate(valor_aux(2,PUNTOSP,PUNTOST))

!...

call SYSTEM_CLOCK(counti,count_rate) 

!$OMP PARALLEL NUM_THREADS(THREADS) DEFAULT(PRIVATE) FIRSTPRIVATE(REGIONS) &
!$OMP SHARED(SUMATORIO,SUM,PP,VEC_1,VEC_2,IDENT,TIPO,MUESTRA,PUNTOST,PUNTOSP) 
!$OMP DO SCHEDULE(DYNAMIC,8)
DO i=1,REGIONS
    INDICE=VEC_1(i) 
    valor_aux = cmplx(0.0,0.0)
    DO j=1,VEC_2(i)     
        ii=IDENT(INDICE+1)
        INDICE=INDICE+1     
        IF(TIPO(ii).ne.4) THEN   
            j1=MUESTRA(ii)
            DO I1=1,PUNTOST
                DO I2=1,PUNTOSP
                valor_aux(1,I2,I1)=valor_aux(1,I2,I1)+SUM(I1,I2,J1,1)*PP(ii)
                valor_aux(2,I2,I1)=valor_aux(2,I2,I1)+SUM(I1,I2,J1,2)*PP(ii)
                END DO 
            END DO  
        END IF 
    END DO
    SUMATORIO(1)%REGION(i)%VALOR= valor_aux
END DO
!$OMP END DO
!$OMP END PARALLEL 

call SYSTEM_CLOCK(countf)
dt=REAL(countf-counti)/REAL(count_rate)
write(*,*)'FASE_1: Time: ',dt,'seconds'

Some points to know:

  • All data types are COMPLEX, except for loop vectors
  • NUM_DATA = 14000000
  • REGIONS = 1000000
  • Values contained in VEC_2 are between 10 and 20
  • PUNTOST = 21
  • PUNTOSP = 20
  • All allocated memory consume about 60 Gb of RAM

I've tried to change the dimensions of the matrixes to evade excesive memory caching (SUM(2,PUNTOSP,PUNTOST,NUM_DATA) for example) but this is the way in which I've obtained the best performance (I don't know the reason because in most of documents I've read they say that you have to try to make memory access be "sequential" to make the CPU brings the least amount of memory to cachee).

Also I've changed memory alignment to 32, 64 and 128 bytes but It didn't improve nothing.

Also I've changed the SCHEDULE option to STATIC with different chunk sizes and DYNAMIC with different chunk sizes but the results are the same or worse.

Do you have some ideas that I could use to improve the performance when using 8 or more cores?

Thank you so much for your attention and help.

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2 Answers 2

Dividing by 6 the cpu time using 12 processors is rather good. In my applications I get rarely more than 4 or 5 (but it always remains sequential parts which is possibly the reason of that).

You could try the option collapse allowing to merge two loops together... But I don't know whether this is possible in your case because they are conditions to fulfill (for instance no instruction between the two loops).

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I was trying to improve more than 6 times the performance and trying to reach the most as possible the improvement peak because If a user wants to use 16, 32 or more cores, he'll find that there is no much difference between 12 or more :( –  CapitanCachopo Feb 19 '14 at 17:09

While working on multidimensional arrays in Fortran, the leftmost index should change the fastest. You could try to change the order of the indices of valor_aux and SUM to

valor_aux(PUNTOSP, PUNTOST, 2)
SUM(PUNTOSP, PUNTOST, NUM_DATA, 2)

Additionally, you should always mind Amdahl's law. There is always some overhead, which yields additional speedup impossible.

Also: In your two innermost loops, the factor PP(ii) doesn't change. You should try to apply it after these loops (except, you know, that you are using FMA). And these loops are only a SUM of many values. You should try the intrinsic function SUM to remove these loops. Both things could require a massive redesign of your loops.

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Thank you for your response. I've tried to change the order of the indices but contrary to what I thought, the performance decreases using 12 cores (+0.40 to the time). On the other hand, I've redesigned the loops, but the time is the same. –  CapitanCachopo Feb 19 '14 at 17:02

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