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I have about 3000 individual commands that I need to execute on a system via Putty. I am doing this by copying ~100 of the commands and pasting them into a putty SSH session. It works, however the issue is that Putty does not process them serially and the output gets garbled.

Is there a way to make Putty process each command, wait for a return and then process the next? The Windows command prompt does this and I'm thinking there is a way to do so with Putty.

Yes, I know I could put this in a bash script, but due to circumstance outside my control, this has to be done using SSH and in a manner that can be monitored as we go and logged.

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5 Answers 5

I do this all the time. Put your commands in a ( ) block, which will run it as a subshell, perfectly everything within serially. I'm running Windows PuTTY and connecting to Linux and AIX servers. Try it.

(
Command1
Command2
Command3
)

In practice, I might have a huge load of many 100s of statements I want to run, in Notepad++ or whatever. So I copy them to clipboard, and then in PuTTY:

(   
 paste in your wad here
)

EDIT: If you want to log the output from each of your statements individually, you might do something like this:

(
Command1 > /home/jon/command1output.txt
Command2 > /home/jon/command2output.txt
Command3 > /home/jon/command3output.txt
)

or if you just want one big stream of output, you could interleave separators for easier reading later:

(
echo "~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~"
echo "[`date`]  Now running Command1 ..."
Command1
echo "~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~"
echo "[`date`]  Now running Command2 ..."
Command2
echo "~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~"
echo "[`date`]  Now running Command3 ..."
Command3
)

EDIT2: Another variation using an inline function. All paste-able into PuTTY, with perfect serial running, logging as command1:output1,command2:output2,... , and capable of driving SQL*Plus.

(
  function geniusMagic() {
    echo " "
    echo "~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~"
    date
    echo "RUNNING COMMAND:"
    echo " "
    echo "$*"
    echo " "
    echo "OUTPUT:"    
    echo " "
    sh -c "$*"
  }

  geniusMagic df -m /home
  geniusMagic 'printf $RANDOM | sed "s/0//g"'
  geniusMagic 'echo "select count(*)
                     FROM all_tables;
                 " | sqlplus -s scott/tiger'
)

Sample output:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Wed Jun 25 17:41:19 EDT 2014
RUNNING COMMAND:

df -m /home

OUTPUT:

Filesystem    MB blocks      Free %Used    Iused %Iused Mounted on
/dev/hd1        1024.00    508.49   51%     3164     3% /home

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Wed Jun 25 17:41:19 EDT 2014
RUNNING COMMAND:

printf $RANDOM | sed "s/0//g"

OUTPUT:

2767
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Wed Jun 25 17:41:19 EDT 2014
RUNNING COMMAND:

echo "select count(*)
                     FROM all_tables;
                 " | sqlplus -s scott/tiger

OUTPUT:


  COUNT(*)
----------
        48
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This is the closest answer yet, but it's still not nearly as convenient as simply pasting into a windows command prompt. For example, this won't work when using SQL*Plus in Putty. Also, it would be nicer to see "command:result,command:result", instead of "command,command:result,result". –  Jon Heller Jun 25 '14 at 21:09
    
added EDIT2 above to give you command:result pairs and seems to work with SQL*Plus. Not sure about your exact Oracle layout, such as is the Oracle database on the same server that you're SSH into? –  Joshua Huber Jun 25 '14 at 21:49
    
This answer didn't quit help me with my original problem so I didn't award the original bounty. But it just helped me solve a different problem, so I'll give you a bounty this time (in 23 hours, when I'm allowed to award it). –  Jon Heller Oct 12 '14 at 21:23

Just an idea here, Putty comes with a command-line tool called Plink. You could write a script on your windows machine that creates a connection to the remote server with Plink, then parses your list of commands one at a time and sends them.

This should look exactly the same to the remote server (which I assume is what's doing the logging), while letting you have a bit more control than copy-pasting blocks of commands.

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The remote server is not doing the logging, unfortunately. Plus, what I need to capture is the return text from each command. –  user3329270 Feb 19 '14 at 18:14
    
Well, logging on the local machine should still see an SSH connection. Plink will definitely allow you to capture the servers response to the commands you're running. –  binaryatrocity Feb 19 '14 at 18:16
    
So close, but plink has an issue in that it will not do any Putty-style logging, even if logging is enabled in saved session. I can redirect the output to a log file (i.e. >>c:\temp\log.txt) but errors returned by the remote server do not show up in the log, only success messages. –  user3329270 Feb 20 '14 at 2:15
    
That being the case you could go the full route and install CYGWIN, this will give you a normal bash shell on windows and the real SSH client (www.cygwin.com). Alternatively, it may be easier to quickly write a script to do this with a language you are familiar with (python, perl etc) –  binaryatrocity Feb 20 '14 at 2:18
    
Ended up just creating a shell script and getting access to BASH on the remote server. Logging still didn't work quite like I needed, but we made it work. Thanks so much for the assistance. –  user3329270 Feb 20 '14 at 15:05

I'm not sure why you could not use Plink, but you could make a batch file with Notepad++.

plink <hostname> -l <login_name> -pw <password> <command 1>
plink <hostname> -l <login_name> -pw <password> <command 2>
plink <hostname> -l <login_name> -pw <password> <command 3>
...
plink <hostname> -l <login_name> -pw <password> <command 3000>

Run the batch file:

filename.bat > log.txt 2>&1

Notepad++: http://notepad-plus-plus.org/

Plink: http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/download.html

Batch files: http://www.robvanderwoude.com/batchfiles.php
Display & Redirect Output: http://www.robvanderwoude.com/battech_redirection.php

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Maybe the answer you are looking for is here.

Here a copy of the answer I think may be interesting for you :

   // Wait for backup setting prompt 
    Repeat Until %D1% = 1
      Activate Window: "DAYMISYS1.qdx.com - PuTTY"
      Mouse Move Window 12, 11                        <-------  Moves mouse to upper left corner to activate menu options
      Mouse Right Button Click
      Delay 0.1 Seconds
      Text Type: o                                    <-------  Activates Copy All to Clipboard command   
      Delay 0.2 Seconds
      If Clipboard Contains "or select a number to change a setting:"      <-------  Look for text of prompt that I am waiting for
      Repeat Exit                                     <-------  If found, exit loop and continue macro
      End If
      Delay 1 Seconds                                 <-------  If prompt is not found, continue loop
    Repeat End
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This may be helpful to some but buying and installing proprietary software will not work for most people. –  Jon Heller Jun 18 '14 at 22:19

I had a similar requirement some years back, and I wrote code to connect to SSH and execute the commands.

There are a lot of SSH libraries available for every programming language(I used Java). You can just connect to SSH using simple few lines of code, and then read the commands from your file, and execute it sequentially. You can log the entire content and voila!

Let me know if you need more details on this.

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