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I need a way to see if a user is part of an active directory group from my .Net 3.5 asp.net c# application.

I am using the standard ldap authentication example off of msdn but I don't really see how to check against a group.

Thanks for any suggestions!

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9 Answers 9

With 3.5 and System.DirectoryServices.AccountManagement this is a bit cleaner:

public List<string> GetGroupNames(string userName)
{
  var pc = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain);
  var src = UserPrincipal.FindByIdentity(pc, userName).GetGroups(pc);
  var result = new List<string>();
  src.ToList().ForEach(sr => result.Add(sr.SamAccountName));
  return result;
}
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This is incredibly elegant and worked like a charm. –  Tommy Fisk May 9 '12 at 13:42
    
I get this error on the code listed: Unknown error (0x80005000) Description: An unhandled exception occurred during the execution of the current web request. Please review the stack trace for more information about the error and where it originated in the code. Exception Details: System.Runtime.InteropServices.COMException: Unknown error (0x80005000) The line causing it is: "var src = UserPrincipal.FindByIdentity(pc, userName).GetGroups(pc);" Any suggestions on what the problem could be? I copied the function as-is from your example. –  Ben Aug 26 '13 at 18:59
    
@Ben are you sure the account you're using has permissions to query AD? Many places have anonymous binds disabled –  Nick Craver Aug 26 '13 at 19:14
    
@NickCraver That looks to be it--I do have a logon failure listed at the time of the attempt. I'm looking into how to fix that now, thank you. :) –  Ben Aug 26 '13 at 19:30
2  
I'm using .NET 4.0 and I had to change this line, var pc = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain); to var pc = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, "MyDomainHere"); To get rid of the exception. After that works perfectly. –  Dan Feb 25 at 19:52

Nick Craver's solution doesn't work for me in .NET 4.0. I get an error about an unloaded AppDomain. Instead of using that, I used this (we only have one domain). This will check groups of groups as well as direct group membership.

using System.DirectoryServices.AccountManagement;

...

using (var ctx = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, yourDomain)) {
    using (var grp = GroupPrincipal.FindByIdentity(ctx, IdentityType.Name, yourGroup)) {
        bool isInRole = grp != null && 
            grp
            .GetMembers(true)
            .Any(m => m.SamAccountName == me.Identity.Name.Replace(yourDomain + "\\", ""));
    }
}
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The code below will work in .net 4.0

private static string[] GetGroupNames(string userName)
{
    List<string> result = new List<string>();

    using (PrincipalContext pc = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, "YOURDOMAIN"))
    {
        using (PrincipalSearchResult<Principal> src = UserPrincipal.FindByIdentity(pc, userName).GetGroups(pc))
        {
            src.ToList().ForEach(sr => result.Add(sr.SamAccountName));
        }
    }

    return result.ToArray();
}
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Simplest Solution

PrincipalContext pc = new PrincipalContext((Environment.UserDomainName == Environment.MachineName ? ContextType.Machine : ContextType.Domain), Environment.UserDomainName);

GroupPrincipal gp = GroupPrincipal.FindByIdentity(pc, "{GroupName}");
UserPrincipal up = UserPrincipal.FindByIdentity(pc, Environment.UserName);
up.IsMemberOf(gp);
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It depends on what you mean by if a user is in an AD group. In AD, groups can be a Security group or Distribution group. Even for security groups, it depends on if groups like "Domain Users" or "Users" need to be included in the membership check.

IsUserInSecurityGroup will only check for security groups and will work for Primary Group kind of groups like "Domain Users" and "Users", and not distribution groups. It will also solve the issue with nested groups. IsUserInAllGroup will also check for Distribution groups, but I am not sure if you would run into permission issues. If you do, use a service account that is in WAAG (See MSDN)

The reason I am not using UserPrincipal.GetAuthorizedGroups() is because it has a lot of issues, such as requiring the calling account to be in WAAG and requiring there isn't an entry in SidHistory (See David Thomas' comment)

public bool IsUserInSecurityGroup(string user, string group)
    {
        return IsUserInGroup(user, group, "tokenGroups");
    }
    public bool IsUserInAllGroup(string user, string group)
    {
        return IsUserInGroup(user, group, "tokenGroupsGlobalAndUniversal");
    }

    private bool IsUserInGroup(string user, string group, string groupType)
    {
        var userGroups = GetUserGroupIds(user, groupType);
        var groupTokens = ParseDomainQualifiedName(group, "group");
        using (var groupContext = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, groupTokens[0]))
        {
            using (var identity = GroupPrincipal.FindByIdentity(groupContext, IdentityType.SamAccountName, groupTokens[1]))
            {
                if (identity == null)
                    return false;

                return userGroups.Contains(identity.Sid);
            }
        }
    }
    private List<SecurityIdentifier> GetUserGroupIds(string user, string groupType)
    {
        var userTokens = ParseDomainQualifiedName(user, "user");
        using (var userContext = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, userTokens[0]))
        {
            using (var identity = UserPrincipal.FindByIdentity(userContext, IdentityType.SamAccountName, userTokens[1]))
            {
                if (identity == null)
                    return new List<SecurityIdentifier>();

                var userEntry = identity.GetUnderlyingObject() as DirectoryEntry;
                userEntry.RefreshCache(new[] { groupType });
                return (from byte[] sid in userEntry.Properties[groupType]
                        select new SecurityIdentifier(sid, 0)).ToList();
            }
        }
    }
    private static string[] ParseDomainQualifiedName(string name, string parameterName)
    {
        var groupTokens = name.Split(new[] {"\\"}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
        if (groupTokens.Length < 2)
            throw new ArgumentException(Resources.Exception_NameNotDomainQualified + name, parameterName);
        return groupTokens;
    }
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All other answers are wrong to me because they don't take care of nested groups. Thanks. –  thibaultd Dec 16 '13 at 11:16

This method might be helpful if you're trying to determine if the Windows authenticated current user is in a particular role.

public static bool CurrentUserIsInRole(string role)
{
    try
    {
        return System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Request
                    .LogonUserIdentity
                    .Groups
                    .Any(x => x.Translate(typeof(NTAccount)).ToString() == role);
        }
        catch (Exception) { return false; }
    }
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You could try the following code:

public bool Check_If_Member_Of_AD_Group(string username, string grouptoCheck, string domain, string ADlogin, string ADpassword)
{
    
     try {
        
        string EntryString = null;
        EntryString = "LDAP://" + domain;
        
        DirectoryEntry myDE = default(DirectoryEntry);
        
        grouptoCheck = grouptoCheck.ToLower();
        
        
        myDE = new DirectoryEntry(EntryString, ADlogin, ADpassword);
        
        DirectorySearcher myDirectorySearcher = new DirectorySearcher(myDE);
        
        myDirectorySearcher.Filter = "sAMAccountName=" + username;
        
        myDirectorySearcher.PropertiesToLoad.Add("MemberOf");
        
        SearchResult myresult = myDirectorySearcher.FindOne();
        
        int NumberOfGroups = 0;
        
        NumberOfGroups = myresult.Properties("memberOf").Count() - 1;
        
        string tempString = null;
        
        while ((NumberOfGroups >= 0)) {
            
            tempString = myresult.Properties("MemberOf").Item(NumberOfGroups);
            tempString = tempString.Substring(0, tempString.IndexOf(",", 0));
            
            tempString = tempString.Replace("CN=", "");
            
            tempString = tempString.ToLower();
            tempString = tempString.Trim();
            
            if ((grouptoCheck == tempString)) {
                
                    
                return true;
            }
            
                
            NumberOfGroups = NumberOfGroups - 1;
        }
        
            
        return false;
    }
    catch (Exception ex) {
        
        System.Diagnostics.Debugger.Break();
    }
    //HttpContext.Current.Response.Write("Error: <br><br>" & ex.ToString)
}
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As with BC's answer the above code will not test for nested membership –  Mick Walker Feb 3 '10 at 0:59
    
This code doesn't even compile in 3.5 C#, what's the deal? –  Justin Oct 7 '10 at 14:39

Brandon Johnson, loved it, I used what you had, but made the following change:

private static string[] GetGroupNames(string domainName, string userName)
{
    List<string> result = new List<string>();

    using (PrincipalContext principalContext = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, domainName))
    {
        using (PrincipalSearchResult<Principal> src = UserPrincipal.FindByIdentity(principalContext, userName).GetGroups(principalContext))
        {
            src.ToList().ForEach(sr => result.Add(sr.SamAccountName));
        }
    }

    return result.ToArray();
}
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