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I read in couple of blogs that in Java modulo/reminder operator is slower than bitwise-AND. So, I wrote following program to test.

public class ModuloTest {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        final int size = 1024;
        int index = 0;

        long start = System.nanoTime();
        for(int i = 0; i < Integer.MAX_VALUE; i++) {
            getNextIndex(size, i);
        }
        long end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println("Time taken by Modulo (%) operator --> " + (end - start) + "ns.");

        start = System.nanoTime();
        final int shiftFactor = size - 1;
        for(int i = 0; i < Integer.MAX_VALUE; i++) {
            getNextIndexBitwise(shiftFactor, i);
        }
        end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println("Time taken by bitwise AND --> " + (end - start) + "ns.");
    }

    private static int getNextIndex(int size, int nextInt) {
        return nextInt % size;
    }

    private static int getNextIndexBitwise(int size, int nextInt) {
        return nextInt & size;
    }
}

But in my runtime environment (MacBook Pro 2.9GHz i7, 8GB RAM, JDK 1.7.0_51), I am seeing otherwise. The bitwise-AND is significantly slow, in fact twice as slow than the remainder operator.

Appreciate if someone can help me understand if this is intended behavior or I am doing something wrong?

Thanks, Niranjan

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1  
First, micro-benchmarks bad for multiple reasons, particularly as written. Second, even in a realistic benchmark, there may be multiple optimization steps taken to transform either operation. –  Dave Newton Feb 19 at 19:04
    
How many trials did you run? Did you compute 95% confidence intervals? Were your inputs randomized? Did you performance t-testing (or another appropriate test) to determine your conclusion? Until you do all of these, you can't really say for sure what is faster on your system. –  AndyG Feb 19 at 19:05
    
You should run this kind of benchmarks using a dedicated library; for instance, Google Caliper. –  fge Feb 19 at 19:06
    
When performing each test twice instead of once each, I get significantly faster for the & operations than the % operations for the second test of each: about 5.17 ms for % and about 0.0458 ms for &. –  rgettman Feb 19 at 19:07
    
It would be nice if someone could respectfully and politely offer a hypothesis for SO's observations and/or provide concrete and constructive suggestions on how he/she could improve the experiment. –  pamphlet Feb 19 at 19:10

3 Answers 3

This example in particular will always give you a wrong result. Moreover, I believe that any program which is calculating the modulo by a power of 2 will be faster than bitwise AND.

REASON: When you use N % X where X is kth power of 2, only last k bits are considered for modulo, whereas in case of the bitwise AND operator the runtime actually has to visit each bit of the number under question.

Also, I would like to point out the Hot Spot JVM's optimizes repetitive calculations of similar nature(one of the examples can be branch prediction etc). In your case, the method which is using the modulo just returns the last 10 bits of the number because 1024 is the 10th power of 2.

Try using some prime number value for size and check the same result.

Disclaimer: Micro benchmarking is not considered good.

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there is a reason I used size as Kth power of 2. Basically I am planning to use LMAX disruptor in my app and while going through their documents and talks on that, I found that they chose bitwise over modulo to decide the index on their ring buffers. Thats why I was checking whether bitwise is really fast. –  Niranjan Feb 19 at 20:36
    
Also, the bitwise-AND matches the result of modulo only if the righthand-side operand is nth power of 2. Meaning if operands are x and y, then y must be nth power of 2. Only in such cases, result of x % y and x & y-1 match (consistently). –  Niranjan Feb 20 at 22:39

Your code reports bitwise-and being much faster on each Mac I've tried it on, both with Java 6 and Java 7. I suspect the first portion of the test on your machine happened to coincide with other activity on the system. You should try running the test multiple times to verify you aren't seeing distortions based on that. (I would have left this as a 'comment' rather than an 'answer', but apparently you need 50 reputation to do that -- quite silly, if you ask me.)

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Thank you all for valuable inputs.

@pamphlet: Thank you very much for the concerns, but negative comments are fine with me. I confess that I did not do proper testing as suggested by AndyG. AndyG could have used a softer tone, but its okay, sometimes negatives help seeing the positive. :)

That said, I changed my code (as shown below) in a way that I can run that test multiple times.

public class ModuloTest {
    public static final int SIZE = 1024;

    public int usingModuloOperator(final int operand1, final int operand2) {
        return operand1 % operand2;
    }

    public int usingBitwiseAnd(final int operand1, final int operand2) {
        return operand1 & operand2;
    }

    public void doCalculationUsingModulo(final int size) {
        for(int i = 0; i < Integer.MAX_VALUE; i++) {
            usingModuloOperator(1, size);
        }
    }

    public void doCalculationUsingBitwise(final int size) {
        for(int i = 0; i < Integer.MAX_VALUE; i++) {
            usingBitwiseAnd(i, size);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        final ModuloTest moduloTest = new ModuloTest();

        final int invocationCount = 100;
//        testModuloOperator(moduloTest, invocationCount);

        testBitwiseOperator(moduloTest, invocationCount);
    }

    private static void testModuloOperator(final ModuloTest moduloTest, final int invocationCount) {
        for(int i = 0; i < invocationCount; i++) {
            final long startTime = System.nanoTime();
            moduloTest.doCalculationUsingModulo(SIZE);
            final long timeTaken = System.nanoTime() - startTime;
            System.out.println("Using modulo operator // Time taken for invocation counter " + i + " is " + timeTaken + "ns");
        }
    }

    private static void testBitwiseOperator(final ModuloTest moduloTest, final int invocationCount) {
        for(int i = 0; i < invocationCount; i++) {
            final long startTime = System.nanoTime();
            moduloTest.doCalculationUsingBitwise(SIZE);
            final long timeTaken = System.nanoTime() - startTime;
            System.out.println("Using bitwise operator // Time taken for invocation counter " + i + " is " + timeTaken + "ns");
        }
    }
}

I called testModuloOperator() and testBitwiseOperator() in mutual exclusive way. The result was consistent with the idea that bitwise is faster than modulo operator. I ran each of the calculation 100 times and recorded the execution times. Then removed first five and last five recordings and used rest to calculate the avg. time. And, below are my test results.

  1. Using modulo operator, the avg. time for 90 runs: 8388.89ns.
  2. Using bitwise-AND operator, the avg. time for 90 runs: 722.22ns.

Please suggest if my approach is correct or not.

Thanks again. Niranjan

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