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Errors:

main.cpp: In function 'constexpr int fib(int)':
main.cpp:6:42: warning: comparison between signed and unsigned integer expressions [-Wsign-compare]
     return (n < sizeof(ftbl)/sizeof(*ftbl)) ? ftbl[n] : fib(n-2) + fib(n-1);
                ^
/tmp/cch0aLwI.o: In function `main':
main.cpp:(.text.startup+0xf): undefined reference to `std::cout'
main.cpp:(.text.startup+0x16): undefined reference to `std::ostream::operator<<(int)'
main.cpp:(.text.startup+0x2d): undefined reference to `std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >& std::__ostream_insert<char, std::char_traits<char> >(std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >&, char const*, long)'
main.cpp:(.text.startup+0x3c): undefined reference to `std::cout'
main.cpp:(.text.startup+0x43): undefined reference to `std::ostream::operator<<(int)'
main.cpp:(.text.startup+0x5a): undefined reference to `std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >& std::__ostream_insert<char, std::char_traits<char> >(std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >&, char const*, long)'
main.cpp:(.text.startup+0x69): undefined reference to `std::cout'
main.cpp:(.text.startup+0x70): undefined reference to `std::ostream::operator<<(int)'
main.cpp:(.text.startup+0x87): undefined reference to `std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >& std::__ostream_insert<char, std::char_traits<char> >(std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >&, char const*, long)'
/tmp/cch0aLwI.o: In function `_GLOBAL__sub_I_main':
main.cpp:(.text.startup+0xaa): undefined reference to `std::ios_base::Init::Init()'
main.cpp:(.text.startup+0xb9): undefined reference to `std::ios_base::Init::~Init()'
collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status

It executes without a problem in clang.

The example was taken from page 312 of B.Stroustrup's new book "TCPL".

#include <iostream>

constexpr int ftbl[] { 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13 };
constexpr int fib(int n)
{
    return (n < sizeof(ftbl)/sizeof(*ftbl)) ? ftbl[n] : fib(n-2) + fib(n-1);
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << fib(1) << '\n';
    std::cout << fib(2) << '\n';
    std::cout << fib(6) << '\n';
}

Compiler invokation: gcc-4.8 -std=c++11 -O2 -pedantic -pthread -Wall main.cpp && ./a.out

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closed as off-topic by stefan, Lightness Races in Orbit, Praetorian, harper, lpapp Feb 20 '14 at 3:47

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – stefan, Lightness Races in Orbit, Praetorian, harper, lpapp
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

10  
use g++ instead of gcc: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/2b157d362791bec4 –  stefan Feb 19 '14 at 19:13
    
@stefan Perfect. I'll accept this as answer. –  Wake up Brazil Feb 19 '14 at 19:15
1  
there's not actually the need for an answer here, as the fix is simply typographic. Users with the same problem probably won't find this Q/A, but ask their own question. Therefore, I would suggest to close this question (I already flagged it). –  stefan Feb 19 '14 at 19:19
    
To fix the unsigned warning and to be thorough, add another ? operator to check for n < 0 else cast to unsigned and return the answer. Because, what would your expression do if you passed -1? –  Zan Lynx Feb 19 '14 at 19:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use g++ instead of gcc.

Alternatively, you can link the standard library if you want. You need to put it at the end though because of linking order.

gcc-4.8 -x c++ -std=c++11 -O2 -pedantic -Wall -pthread main.cpp -lstdc++  && ./a.out
share|improve this answer
    
-x c++ tells the compiler to treat files specified on the command line as C++. It's not necessary when the file extension is one the compiler recognizes as C++ by default, such as .cpp. –  Casey Feb 19 '14 at 20:53

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