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I'm trying edit an xml file which has the following values

<item type="4" key="Port 1 Desc" value_type="1">
<item type="4" key="Port 1 InOctets" value_type="3">
<item type="4" key="Port 1 OutOctets" value_type="3">

I would like to eliminate the space and replce it with - my desired output would be like this:

<item type="4" key="Port-1-Desc" value_type="1">
<item type="4" key="Port-1-InOctets" value_type="3">
<item type="4" key="Port-1-OutOctets" value_type="3">

Please keep in mind that number 1 is variable, and my xml file has port 2, 3 , 24 ..etc.

Thank you

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So, what is the string you want matched? Anything inside key="..." inside an <item> tag? Any spaces in any name="value" inside any tag? Only key="Port [0-9]* [A-Za-z]*" anywhere in the file, or only inside an <item> tag? –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 19 '14 at 21:04
    
Are you willing to install extra software to make this transformation more robust? The answers you have so far are very fragile, and won't work with many different ways of writing the same XML file, or risk side effects (doing the replacement on other keys, for instance). Doing it in a robust and safe manner requires an XML parser, which bash doesn't ship with built-in. –  Charles Duffy Feb 19 '14 at 21:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

We prefer to use xml tool directly to handle xml file, such as in @Charles Duffy's reply.

Here is the way which only for this file, using awk.

awk  '{gsub(/ /,"-",$4)}1' FS=\" OFS=\" file

<item type="4" key="Port-1-Desc" value_type="1">
<item type="4" key="Port-1-InOctets" value_type="3">
<item type="4" key="Port-1-OutOctets" value_type="3">

Explaination

  • gsub(regexp, replacement [, target]) Search target for all of the longest, leftmost, nonoverlapping matching substrings it can find and replace them with replacement. The ‘g’ in gsub() stands for “global,” which means replace everywhere.
  • FS=\" OFS=\" field separators
  • 1 same as print
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1  
This is very, very fragile. It has only the desired effect on the given sample input, sure -- but by no means does it limit itself to key attributes attached to item elements, or (for that matter) to XML elements as opposed to text strings at all. Thus, for any nontrivial real-world input, it is very likely to have unintended side effects. –  Charles Duffy Feb 19 '14 at 22:32
    
+1, I get and agree your points. The problem is, when I ask someone else to use xml tools to work on this scenario, they don't like to install new tools to work on it. I added some comments about it in my answers. –  BMW Feb 19 '14 at 23:49
    
Not sure what does $4 means? and why is the field separators \? thanks –  Deano Feb 21 '14 at 13:12

Using sed

sed "{$(echo 's/ /-/3;'{,})}" file

$ cat file
<item type="4" key="Port 1 Desc" value_type="1">
<item type="4" key="Port 1 InOctets" value_type="3">
<item type="4" key="Port 1 OutOctets" value_type="3">

$ sed "{$(echo 's/ /-/3;'{,})}" file
<item type="4" key="Port-1-Desc" value_type="1">
<item type="4" key="Port-1-InOctets" value_type="3">
<item type="4" key="Port-1-OutOctets" value_type="3">
share|improve this answer

This approach requires XMLStarlet.

It has the advantage of working as long as your XML is valid, rather than relying on the line-by-line formatting being exact, as many of the other answers here do.

elem=
xmlstarlet pyx | while IFS='' read -r line; do
  if [[ $line = '('* ]]; then
    elem=${line:1}
    printf '%s\n' "$line"
  elif [[ $line = Akey* && $elem = item ]]; then
    value=${line#*" "}
    value=${line//" "/_}
    printf 'Akey %s\n' "$value"
  else
    printf '%s\n' "$line"
  fi
done | xmlstarlet depyx
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2  
+1 for using right tool for the job! sed and awk are just wild hacks. –  jaypal singh Feb 19 '14 at 21:13

Here is the single line solution using sed

sed 's/Port \([0-9]*\) /Port-\1-/g' filename

Note that, \1 is the remembered pattern.

aman@apollo:~$ cat t

<item type="4" key="Port 1 Desc" value_type="1">
<item type="4" key="Port 1 InOctets" value_type="3">
<item type="4" key="Port 1 OutOctets" value_type="3">

aman@apollo:~$ sed 's/Port \([0-9]*\) /Port-\1-/g' t
<item type="4" key="Port-1-Desc" value_type="1">
<item type="4" key="Port-1-InOctets" value_type="3">
<item type="4" key="Port-1-OutOctets" value_type="3">
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