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Using Perl, i need to parse and rearrange csv files that has some dynamic fields (devices and associated values)

Here is the original csv (the header is here for description only)

DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,hostname,timestamp,origin-timestamp,sda,sda1,sda2,sda3,sdb,sdb1,sdb2,sdb3
DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,host001,19-FEB-2014 20:55:47,T0001,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0,18.0,0.0,18.0,0.0
DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,host001,19-FEB-2014 20:55:49,T0002,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0
DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,host001,19-FEB-2014 20:55:51,T0003,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0
DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,host001,19-FEB-2014 20:55:53,T0004,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0,369.8,0.0,369.8,0.0
DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,host001,19-FEB-2014 20:55:55,T0005,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0,0.0

I need it to be transformed into:

DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,hostname,timestamp,origin-timestamp,device,value
DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,host001,19-FEB-2014 20:55:47,T0001,sda,0.0
DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,host001,19-FEB-2014 20:55:47,T0001,sda1,0.0

... and so on

Here is the sample code that generates the csv file based on original data:

if (((rindex $l,"DISKBUSY,") > -1)) {
#Open destination file
if( ! open(FILE,">>".$dstfile_DISKBUSY) ) {
    exit(1);
}
(my @line) = split(",",$l);

my $section = "DISKBUSY";
my $write = $section.",".$SerialNumber.",".$hostnameT.",".
                $timestamp.",".$line[1];
my $i = 2;
while ($i <= $#line) {
    $write = $write.','.$line[$i];
  $i = $i + 1;
}
print (FILE $write."\n"); 

close( FILE );

}

I need to rearrange it as described to be able to work with the data in a generic way, but dynamic fields (name of devices) drives me crazy :-)

Many thanks for any help !

share|improve this question
    
So you want each line of input to be repeated 8 times in the output, once for each of your disks and each time selecting the next real number from the last 8 fields. Is that it? –  Mark Setchell Feb 19 at 22:43
    
You can interpolate variables in double quoted strings, you do not need to use the concatenation operator .: "$foo,$bar". –  TLP Feb 19 at 22:48
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use Text::CSV:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Text::CSV;

my $csv = Text::CSV->new({
    binary => 1,
    auto_diag => 1,
    eol => "\n"
}) or die "Cannot use CSV: " . Text::CSV->error_diag();

open my $fh, '<', 'file.csv' or die $!;

my @columns = @{ $csv->getline($fh) };
my @device_columns = @columns[5..$#columns];

my @header = (@columns[0..4], "device", "value");
$csv->print(\*STDOUT, \@header);

while (my $row = $csv->getline($fh)) {
    foreach my $i (0..$#device_columns) {
        my @output = (@$row[0..4], $device_columns[$i], $row->[5+$i]);
        $csv->print(\*STDOUT, \@output);
    }
}

close $fh;

Output:

DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,hostname,timestamp,origin-timestamp,device,value
DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,host001,"19-FEB-2014 20:55:47",T0001,sda,0.0
DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,host001,"19-FEB-2014 20:55:47",T0001,sda1,0.0
DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,host001,"19-FEB-2014 20:55:47",T0001,sda2,0.0
DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,host001,"19-FEB-2014 20:55:47",T0001,sda3,0.0
DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,host001,"19-FEB-2014 20:55:47",T0001,sdb,18.0
DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,host001,"19-FEB-2014 20:55:47",T0001,sdb1,0.0
DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,host001,"19-FEB-2014 20:55:47",T0001,sdb2,18.0
DISKBSIZE,sn_unknown,host001,"19-FEB-2014 20:55:47",T0001,sdb3,0.0

(this is only the output for the first row of your input data)

Better solution

The following uses getline_hr to return each row in the input CSV as a hashref, which makes the code a bit cleaner:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Data::Dumper;
use Text::CSV;

my $csv = Text::CSV->new({
    binary => 1,
    auto_diag => 1,
    eol => "\n"
}) or die "Cannot use CSV: " . Text::CSV->error_diag();

open my $fh, '<', 'file.csv' or die $!;

$csv->column_names($csv->getline($fh));

my @cols = ( $csv->column_names );
my @devices = splice @cols, 5;

my @header = ( @cols, "device", "value" );
$csv->print(\*STDOUT, \@header);

while (my $hr = $csv->getline_hr($fh)) {
    foreach my $device (@devices) {
        my @output = ( @$hr{@cols}, $device, $hr->{$device} );
        $csv->print(\*STDOUT, \@output);
    }
}

close $fh;
share|improve this answer
    
Cant' find my words to thank you !!! I was thinking the solution was that kind of but Perl syntax and concepts aren't yet very clear to me :-) Many thanks ! –  Guilmxm Feb 20 at 7:04
    
@Guilmxm You're welcome. I just added a slightly cleaner solution to my answer if you're interested. –  ThisSuitIsBlackNot Feb 20 at 15:31
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Use the Text::CSV module.

You can assign header names with $csv->column_names(@column_names) and then use $csv->getline_hr to get the line as a hash reference where the hash reference will be keyed by your column names. This will make it much easier to parse your file.

You don't have to use Text::CSV to write back your file (although it makes sure your file is written correctly), but you should use it to parse your data.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks you for answering :-) –  Guilmxm Feb 20 at 7:04
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