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We have inherited an ant build file but now need to deploy to both 32bit and 64bit systems.

The non-Java bits are done with GNUMakefiles where we just call "uname" to get the info. Is there a similar or even easier way to mimic this with ant?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

you can get at the java system properties (http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/System.html#getProperties()) from ant with ${os.arch}. other properties of interest might be os.name, os.version, sun.cpu.endian, and sun.arch.data.model.

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Thanks, that sounds like the sanest approach. Will try that. –  HD. Oct 21 '08 at 12:15
7  
Careful - ${os.arch} only tells you the bit-ness of the JVM, not the platform. See @phatypus's answer. –  Dan Gravell Dec 18 '11 at 14:24
    
good to know - thanks –  Ray Tayek Dec 18 '11 at 17:30

Late to the party, but what the heck...

${os.arch} only tells you if the JVM is 32/64bit. You may be running the 32bit JVM on a 64bit OS. Try this:

<var name ="os.bitness" value ="unknown"/>
<if>
<os family="windows"/>
<then>
    <exec dir="." executable="cmd" outputproperty="command.ouput">
        <arg line="/c SET ProgramFiles(x86)"/>
    </exec>
    <if>
        <contains string="${command.ouput}" substring="Program Files (x86)"/>
        <then>
            <var name ="os.bitness" value ="64"/>
        </then>
        <else>
            <var name ="os.bitness" value ="32"/>
        </else>
    </if>
</then>
<elseif>
    <os family="unix"/>
    <then>
        <exec dir="." executable="/bin/sh" outputproperty="command.ouput">
        <arg line="/c uname -m"/>
        </exec>
        <if>
            <contains string="${command.ouput}" substring="_64"/>
            <then>
                <var name ="os.bitness" value ="64"/>
            </then>
            <else>
                <var name ="os.bitness" value ="32"/>
            </else>
        </if>
    </then>
</elseif>
</if>

<echo>OS bitness: ${os.bitness}</echo>

EDIT: As @GreenieMeanie pointed out, this requires the ant-contrib library from ant-contrib.sourceforge.net

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I can't find an environment property that works across all versions of Windows. For instance, ProgramFiles(x86) doesn't exist under Windows 2000 or Windows XP... For Linux it worked great. Any other thoughts on that? –  Luis Soeiro Jan 23 '12 at 13:43
    
Actually, if I'm reading his script correctly, he is relying on the fact that that the ProgramFiles(x86) environment variable does not exist on 32 bit Windows. –  Mike Nelson Feb 14 '12 at 17:13
    
@MikeNelson - correct. –  phatypus Feb 28 '12 at 5:28
    
@LuisSoeiro - the script worked for me on the OS's I was using at the time; I don't have instances of Windows 2000 or XP to test on for you now. If you are having problems with PROGRAMFILES(x86), does PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE exist on all the other MS OS's? You could always change the windows portion of the script so that it checks if the directory C:\Program Files (x86)\ exists or not -- if it exists you're running 64bit, if not you're running 32 bit. –  phatypus Feb 28 '12 at 5:41
4  
Just a note that using the above syntax requires the ant-contrib library via ant-contrib.sourceforge.net –  GreenieMeanie Jun 25 '13 at 18:54

Here is an answer that works (I tested on Kubuntu 64, Debian 32, Windows 2000 and Windows XP) without the need of external or optional ANT dependencies. It was based on @phatypus's answer.

<project name="FindArchitecture" default="check-architecture" basedir=".">

    <!-- Properties set: unix-like (if it is unix or linux), x64 (if it is 64-bits),
         register- size (32 or 64) -->
    <target name="check-architecture" depends="check-family,check-register" >
        <echo>Register size: ${register-size}</echo>
        <echo>OS Family: ${os-family}</echo>
    </target>

    <target name="check-family" >
        <condition property="os-family" value="unix" else="windows">
            <os family="unix" />
        </condition>

        <condition property="unix">
            <os family="unix" />
        </condition>
    </target>

    <target name="check-register" depends="reg-unix,reg-windows">
    </target>

    <!-- Test under GNU/Linux -->
    <target name="reg-unix" if="unix">
        <exec dir="." executable="uname" outputproperty="result">
            <arg line="-m"/>
        </exec>

        <!-- String ends in 64 -->
        <condition property="x64">
            <matches string="${result}" pattern="^.*64$"/>
        </condition>

        <condition property="register-size" value="64" else="32">
            <isset property="x64"/>
        </condition>
    </target>

    <!-- Test under MS/Windows-->
    <target name="reg-windows" unless="unix">
        <!-- 64 bit Windows versions have the variable "ProgramFiles(x86)" -->
        <exec dir="." executable="cmd" outputproperty="result">
            <arg line="/c SET ProgramFiles(x86)"/>
        </exec>

    <!-- String ends in "Program Files (x86)" -->
        <condition property="x64">
            <matches string="${result}" pattern="^.*=.*Program Files \(x86\)"/>
        </condition>

        <condition property="register-size" value="64" else="32">
            <isset property="x64"/>
        </condition>
    </target> 
</project>
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1  
works for windows 7 64 –  Chris Apr 14 '12 at 9:16

BTW, the os.arch (arch property of the os tag) I got for 64-bit Linux was amd64.

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You can just pass a parameter into the build file with the value you want. For example, if your target is dist:

ant -Dbuild.target=32 dist

or

ant -Dbuild.target=64 dist

and then in your Ant build script, take different actions depending on the value of the ${build.target} property (you can also use conditions to set a default value for the property if it is not set).

Or, you can check the value of the built-in system properties, such as ${os.arch}.

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Assuming you are using ANT for building Java Application, Why would you need to know if it is a 32 bit arch or 64-bit? We can always pass parameters to ant tasks. A cleaner way would be to programmaticaly emit the system properties file used by Ant before calling the actual build. There is this interesting post http://forums.sun.com/thread.jspa?threadID=5306174.

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The thread link broke when Oracle took over Java forums. Can you find the thread and fix the link? –  Jim Garrison Jun 24 '11 at 17:11

os.arch does not work very well, another approach is asking the JVM, for example:

    ~$ java -d32 test
    Mon Jun 04 07:05:00 CEST 2007
    ~$ echo $?
    0
    ~$ java -d64 test
    Running a 64-bit JVM is not supported on this platform.
    ~$ echo $?
    1

That'd have to be in a script or a wrapper.

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1  
It worked for me under Linux but it doesn't seem to work under windows, though. –  Luis Soeiro Jan 23 '12 at 13:41

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