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Here were the requirements:

Adding to IntList:

  • resize method: Write a resize method for IntList that doubles the size of the array. As discussed in chapter 7, you cannot simply resize an array, you must instantiate a new array with increased size, copy everything from the old array to the new array, then assign the old array reference to the new array. For this application, the resize method will ONLY be used by the subclass, but it is good functionality for the IntList class to have.
  • equals method: Write an equals method for IntList. Remember to use the Object parameter! Two IntList objects should be considered equal if they have the same number of elements (without regard to capacity) and each element in each index matches in value.
  • clone method: Write a clone method for IntList. Remember that the clone method should not have parameters, and should return an Object. Your clone method needs to make a deep copy so that the returned object doesn’t contain any aliasing.

(I just need help with the equals, and i would appreciate if you could check if my clone and resize work as intended)

public class IntList
{

    private int[] list;
    private int numElements;

    /**
    * Constructor -- creates an integer list of a given size.
    * @param size the number of elements in the list
    */
    public IntList(int size)
    {
        list = new int[size];
        numElements = 0;
    }

    /**
    * Adds an integer to the list.  If the list is full,
    * prints a message and does nothing.
    * @param value the value to add
    */
    public void add(int value)
    {
        if (numElements == list.length)
            System.out.println("Can't add, list is full");
        else
        {
            list[numElements] = value;
            numElements++;
        }
    }

    /**
    * Retrieves the integer at a specified index
    * @param index the index to retrieve
    * @return the integer at that index
    */
    public int getNum(int index)
    {
        return list[index];
    }

    /**
    * Sets the integer at a specified index
    * @param index the index to change
    * @param num the number to assign at index
    */
    public void setNum(int index, int num)
    {
        list[index] = num;
    }

    /**
    * returns the number of elements in the list
    * @return number of elements
    */
    public int getNumElements()
    {
        return numElements;
    }

    /**
    * returns the length (capacity) of the list
    * @return length
    */
    public int getLength()
    {
        return list.length;
    }

    /**
    * Returns a string containing the elements of the list with their
    * indices.
    * @return the String version of the IntList
    */
    public String toString()
    {
        String returnString = "";
        for (int i=0; i<numElements; i++)
            returnString += i + ": " + list[i] + "\n";
        return returnString;
    }

    // Add resize, equals and clone, and their javadocs
    public void rezise()
    {
        int [] temp = new int[list.length*2];
        for(int i = 0; i<numElements; i++)
        {
            temp[i]=list[i];
            setNum(i,getNum(i));
        }

    }

    public boolean equals(Object o)
    {
        IntList a = (IntList)o;
        if(a.numElements != numElements)
        return false;
        for(int i = 0; i < numElements; i++)
        {
            list[i]!=a.list[i];

        }

    }

    public Object clone()
    {
        IntList a = new IntList(numElements);
        for(int i = 0; i<numElements; i++)
        {
            a.add(list[i]);
        }
        return a;
    }
}
share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Hovercraft Full Of Eels, Jason C, karthik, Pavel Janicek, Soner Gönül Feb 20 '14 at 7:42

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
its really long cuz of the javadocs srry...i only need help on 3 methods – user3331208 Feb 20 '14 at 5:29
1  
What's your question? What is your point of confusion? What help do you need? All I see are requirements and a code dump. Please try to put just a little effort into asking your question. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 20 '14 at 5:29
    
Your code as is doesn't even compile... you know, if you can compile it your can run it and see if it does what you want. – vanza Feb 20 '14 at 5:31
    
i dont know how the equals method works...its supposed to be eqauls if all the values are the same....but how do i do this with out calling any gat... methods – user3331208 Feb 20 '14 at 5:32
1  
You have presumably read your text on it and some tutorials -- please clarify just what you don't understand from what you've read. Don't simply dump your assignment here for us. A good rule of thumb is to try to put as much effort into asking your question as you'd like someone to apply answering it. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 20 '14 at 5:34

Whether you use getters or not (your teacher's claim is dubious) is somewhat irrelevant to how equals must work. First, think what equals means in general: It returns true if this IntList is equal to another specified IntList.

Ok, so now what does it mean for two IntLists to be equal? Well, like your description says:

  1. They must have the same number of elements.
  2. Their element lists must be identical (for every index n, this.list[n] must equal o.list[n].

Those are pretty straightforward rules. In general once you have these kinds of rules laid out, it should become easier to translate them from English to Java.

You can either access the fields directly (e.g. o.numElements) or via getters (e.g. o.getNumElements()), whether you do that or not mildly affects your syntax but generally has no effect on your logic.

In many cases (although certainly not all) you would want to use getters if your class is not final, because derived classes may have different implementations, and you'd want to use those implementations instead of direct field access which may bypass them.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the help – user3331208 Feb 20 '14 at 5:51
    
Sometimes, if you find yourself confused during the implementation, it helps to think about what makes two objects not equal instead; e.g. if any items in the list do not match, then the objects are definitely not equal. – Jason C Feb 20 '14 at 5:54
    
@SSpoke Thank you. Your teaching method is commendable and effective. – Jason C Feb 20 '14 at 6:52

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