Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a promise library, and I'm puzzled by part of the test suite for it (https://github.com/promises-aplus/promises-tests).

There are a number of tests along these lines (simplified for readability):

 var promise = new Promise();

 var done = false;
 var was_resolved = false;
 var was_rejected = false;

 promise.resolve('dummy').then(function() {
   done = true;
   return new Promise();
 });

 promise.then(
   function() { was_resolved = true; },
   function() { was_rejected = true; }
 );

 asyncAssert(function() {
   assert.true(done)
   assert.false(was_resolved);
   assert.false(was_rejected);
 });

Now, I understand the principle of this test; if a promise's resolve function returns a promise, absorb that promise's state (pending in this case).

Therefore, the second then function call's callbacks are not resolved until the promise is resolved itself.

However, looking closely at the spec here (http://promises-aplus.github.io/promises-spec/), I can't see anything that mandates this behaviour.

The relevant points seem to be:

2.2.7 then must return a promise [[3.3](#notes)].
promise2 = promise1.then(onFulfilled, onRejected);

2.2.7.1If either onFulfilled or onRejected returns a value x, run the 
Promise Resolution Procedure [[Resolve]](promise2, x).

and:

To run [[Resolve]](promise, x), perform the following steps:
2.3.2 If x is a promise, adopt its state [[3.4](#notes)]: 

However, if we look closely at the code, we see the promise resolution procedure should be:

var promise = new Promise(); <--- Promise (1)

var promise2 = promise.resolve('dummy').then(function() { <--- Promise (2)
   return new Promise(); <--- Promise (3)
 }); 

var promise4 = promise.then( <--- Promise (4)
   function() { was_resolved = true; },
   function() { was_rejected = true; }
 );

Notice here that currently the 'promise stack' as such is:

- Promise 1 
-- resolve, undefined -> promise 2
-- resolve, reject -> promise 4

Resolution for the async .resolve('dummy') call:

[[Resolve]](1, dummy):
- 2.3.4 forfill promise (1) with 'dummy'
-- Next item on the promise stack for (1)
--- execute resolve
--- return is promise (3)
--- 2.2.7.1 run [[Resolve]](2, promise 3)
-- Next item on the promise stack for (1)
--- execute resolve 
--- return is undefined
--- 2.2.7.3 forfill promise (4) with 'dummy'

Notice that promise 2 is left in a pending state but promise 1 is not because [Resolve] is never invoked on the promise itself. If then() returns a promise, promise 2, we run resolve on that promise (see 2.2.7 on the spec).

Now according to the specification:

Notes 3.3 Implementations may allow promise2 === promise1, provided the implementation
meets all requirements. Each implementation should document whether it can produce 
promise2 === promise1 and under what conditions.

...but that doesn't appear to be true.

It looks that the testsuite requires the returned promise in 2.2.7 to be the original promise, so that when 2.2.7.1 is run, it runs the resolution on itself.

If we look at the 'bare bones' implementation here: https://github.com/then/promise/blob/master/core.js

We see that the handle() function does indeed do something strange, it does this to forfill a promise p:

then() {
  ...
  return new Promise();
}

forfill(p) {
  action = pick appropriate action (p.reject or p.resolve)
  result = action()
  p.resolve(result)
}

That's not what the spec says. The spec explicitly says:

then must return a promise
promise2 = promise1.then(onFulfilled, onRejected);

If either onFulfilled or onRejected returns a value x,
run the Promise Resolution Procedure [[Resolve]](promise2, x).

but what this seems to be doing is:

then must return a promise
promise2 = promise1.then(onFulfilled, onRejected);

If either onFulfilled or onRejected returns a value x,
run the Promise Resolution Procedure [[Resolve]](***promise1***, x).

Notice that in the 'reference' implementation the onFulfilled and onRejected items being invoked are the ones associated with promise1, not promise2.

Perhaps I'm just completely misunderstanding the wording of spec?

What am I missing here?

If I'm writing a promises implementation should I just ignore the spec and copy the implementation specifics from the reference example?

share|improve this question
    
Could you please link the exact test that you are referring to (which you "simplified")? I could only find github.com/promises-aplus/promises-tests/blob/master/lib/tests/…, but that is totally different. –  Bergi Feb 20 at 11:14
    
@Bergi that's the one. Does it do something different? Looks like my simplified version is the same to me. Promise enters testPromiseResolution in resolved state (do a console log on it to check) and then returns a new promise (deferred().promise) and then asserts that neither of the subpromise resolve/reject functions are called? How is mine different? In that it takes a 'dummy' arg for the incoming state? –  Doug Feb 20 at 11:33
    
Oops, you're right - I overlooked what testPromiseResolution does –  Bergi Feb 20 at 11:36
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What am I missing here?

A little suffix :-)

a number of tests along these lines (simplified for readability)

You seem to have oversimplified https://github.com/promises-aplus/promises-tests/blob/master/lib/tests/2.3.2.js. It's code is more like

var promise1 = new Promise().resolve('dummy');

var promise2 = promise1.then(function() {
  return promise3 = new Promise();
}); 

var promise4 = promise2.then(
//                    ^ look here!
  function() { was_resolved = true; },
  function() { was_rejected = true; }
);

Now the "promise stack" looks like this:

- promise 1 
-- resolve, undefined -> promise 2
- promise 2
-- resolve, reject -> promise 4

And promise4 is pending because it relies on promise2 which is pending because it adopted promise3 which is never resolved.

If I'm writing a promises implementation should I just ignore the spec

No. Never. You should definitely try to understand it and the reasoning behind it (if something is unclear open an issue). If you don't agree to some parts of the spec you still might write a non-conforming implementation, but you should try first :-)

share|improve this answer
    
awesome work~! It was really frustrating me trying to figure out why the tests were doing that~ –  Doug Feb 20 at 12:38
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.