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Consider a function that takes an object by value, performs some operations on it and return that object, for example:

std::string MyToUpper (std::string s)
{
      std::transform(s.begin(), s.end(), s.begin(), std::toupper);
      return s;
}

Now you call this function with a temporary:

std::string Myupperstring = MyToUpper("text");

Conceptually there is no copy needed. Are modern Compilers able to elide all copies in this case? If not, are there only moves? What about this case:

std::string Mylowerstring("text");
std::string Myupperstring = MyToUpper(std::move(Mylowerstring));
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The compiler is not allowed to elide the copy in the return in this case and AFAIK there isn't an implicit move here either. –  Simple Feb 20 at 12:30
2  
@Simple: Return values are moved if the type is movable (as `string is here). –  Mike Seymour Feb 20 at 12:38
    
Not related to your question, but your code has undefined behavior (assuming it compiles, which it might not). std::transform will call std::toupper with a char, which results in undefined behavior if plain char is signed (often the case). –  James Kanze Feb 20 at 12:41
    
I checked the standard and function parameters are implicitly moved when they are used as the expression in a return (thought it was only automatic variables), so there the argument will be elided, the parameter will be moved and then the returned value will be elided. –  Simple Feb 20 at 12:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

At most one of the two conceptual copies can be elided. If you pass a temporary to the function, then that copy can be elided, per the third bullet of C++11 12.8/31:

when a temporary class object ... would be copied/moved ..., the copy/move operation can be omitted

The return can't be elided; that can only be done for temporaries (per the rule quoted above) or local variables, per the first bullet:

in a return statement ... when the expression is the name of a non-volatile automatic object (other than a function or catch-clause parameter) ... the copy/move operation can be omitted

In the absence of elision, return values are treated as rvalues and moved if possible (and it is possible here); function arguments are moved if they are rvalues, as they are in both your examples.

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I don't think so. Some of the copies can, and probably will be eliminated, but NVRO cannot apply, since it counts on the variable being constructed in the same location as the return value. Except that with value arguments, the argument is constructed by the caller, who cannot see (in general) that the argument will be returned, and so cannot construct it in the correct place.

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Conceptually there is no copy needed. Are modern Compilers able to elide all copies in this case?

Yes, if the function is inlined, it is possible. However, I would like to consider the code example below instead of yours because std::string is an untamed beast full of obscure optimizations.

So let's consider an example with ints instead. The caller has {1, 2, 3} and would like to create in-place a std::vector<int> from this that contains {2, 4, 6}. (It is roughly the analogue of having the literal "text" at the caller and wanting to construct in-place a std::string that contains "TEXT".)

Code:

#include <cstdio>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

vector<int> mult(vector<int> v) {
  for (int& e : v)
    e *= 2;
  return v;
}

int main() {
  vector<int> v( mult({1, 2, 3}) );
  for (int i : v)
    printf("%d\n", i);
}

If I compile it with gcc 4.7.2 as: g++ -O3 -fwhole-program -Wall -Wextra -std=c++11 -S file.cpp, I get exactly one std::vector<int> destructor call in the assembly. The vector was created in-place. The generated assembly is as good as it can get.

If I compile the exact same code but omit the -fwhole-program flag, the mult() function doesn't get inlined, and I get two calls to the destructor of std::vector<int>. The generated assembly is also much worse than in the previous case.

Clang doesn't know the -fwhole-program flag, so I added the static keyword to mult():

static vector<int> mult(vector<int> v) { ...

and then it also creates the vector in-place.


From James Kanze's answer:

with value arguments, the argument is constructed by the caller, who cannot see (in general) that the argument will be returned, and so cannot construct it in the correct place.

What I did above (inlining mult()) made it possible that the caller can see that the argument will be returned and in effect, the result was constructed in-place.

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