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Im trying to figure out how to make a generic delegate returning a generic value. My first non-generic scenario looks like this.

    delegate int FirstDelegate(int i);
    static FirstDelegate method;

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        method = ReturnInt;
        int i = method(3);
    }

    static int ReturnInt(int i)
    {
        return i;
    }

No problems here. Everything works fine. However when I make it generic things spin out of control.

    delegate T FirstDelegate<T>(T i);
    static FirstDelegate<T> method; <--

Already here he starts complaining about type or namespace etc etc not found. Anyone have any ideas of how to get this working?

Edit: My real goal is that I have a cache that can contain many different cache objects. And now I want a single method that is generic so I can get all objects through this one. I could make it return object or a baseclass, but then I still would have to cast each object everywhere its used.

Dog / cat example The non-generic parts are working.. the generic.. not so much

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        //Clientside
        Cache.method = GetAnimalOnClient;

        //not working
        Cache.methodGeneric = GetAnimalOnClientGeneric;

        var cat = Cache.GetCachedObj(AnimalType.Cat);
        var dog = Cache.GetCachedObj(AnimalType.Dog);

        //Want do
        vad dog = Cache.GetCachedObj<Dog>();
    }

    private static Animal GetAnimalOnClient(AnimalType type)
    {
        if (type == AnimalType.Dog)
            return Cache._Dogs.First();
        else
            return Cache._Cats.First();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// This is the one I want to use
    /// </summary>
    private static T GetAnimalOnClientGeneric<T>() where T: Animal
    {
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(Cat))
            return Cache._Cats.First() as T;
        return Cache._Dogs.First() as T;
    }
}

public enum AnimalType
{
    Dog,
    Cat
}

public static class Cache
{
    delegate Animal GetCacheObjectDelegate(AnimalType type);
    public static GetCacheObjectDelegate method;

    delegate Animal GetCacheObjectDelegate<T>() where T : Animal;
    public static GetCacheObjectDelegate<T> methodGeneric; //<--Complains here

    public static List<Dog> _Dogs = new List<Dog>();
    public static List<Cat> _Cats = new List<Cat>();

    public static Animal GetCachedObj(AnimalType type)
    {
        return method(type);
    }

    public static T GetCachedObj<T>() where T: Animal
    {
        return methodGeneric<T>(); //NOPE
    }
}

public class Animal
{

}

public class Dog : Animal
{

}

public class Cat : Animal
{

}
share|improve this question
    
I suspect that was a typo, but what you have there is a field, not a method. – dcastro Feb 20 '14 at 12:54
    
Ye it's a field that is containing a pointer to the method. I usually name my fields after what they are containing. : ) – Evelie Feb 20 '14 at 12:58
    
That changes things.. I'll revise my answer in a couple of minutes. – dcastro Feb 20 '14 at 13:00
    
"And now I want a single method that is generic" Which is it? The title says you want a generic delegate, the code shows a generic field, but the update says a generic method... – dcastro Feb 20 '14 at 13:07
    
Also, please add an actual example of what you're trying to achieve, with actual method/field/class names. Even if it's peuso-code. You say this is about caching, but I don't see why you'd need a field with a type of a generic delegate. – dcastro Feb 20 '14 at 13:10
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're overcomplicating things.

public static class Cache
{
    private static List<Dog> _dogs = new List<Dog>();
    private static List<Cat> _cats = new List<Cat>();

    public static TAnimal GetCachedObj<TAnimal>() where T: Animal
    {
        if(TAnimal == typeof(Dog))
           return (TAnimal) _dogs.First();
        else if (TAnimal == typeof(Cat))
           return (TAnimal) _cats.First();
        else throw new InvalidOperationException("Invalid generic type argument");
    }
}

But your whole design has a flaw: it breaks the Liskov Substitution Principle.

The LSP states that if T (for example, Cat) is a subtype of Animal, then any instance of Animal can be replaced with T without any surprising effects.

Let me ellaborate. Say that you decide to create a new animal, a Giraffe. Now, if you call GetCachedObj<Giraffe>, you'll get an exception! The code does not work for any subtype of Animal, the LSP does not hold!

Instead you should make the cache class generic, and use a cache instance for every kind of animal

public class Cache<T> where T: Animal
{
    private static List<T> _animals = new List<T>();

    public T GetCachedObj()
    {
        return _animals.First();
    }
}

var dogsCache = new Cache<Dog>();
Dog dog = dogsCache.GetCachedObj();

var catsCache = new Cache<Cat>();
Cat cat = catsCache.GetCachedObj();

This will always work for any kind of animal.

Note: I believe Cache shouldn't be static. Instead, you can use the Singleton pattern to have one single cache instance across the application (per animal type), or use Dependency Injection (with a framework such as Castle Windsor) to inject a cache into every client.


old answer

You either bind the method's generic type argument to a specific type at declaration-time (as @Sean mentioned), or you make the enclosing type generic as well.

public class MyClass<T>
{
    public FirstDelegate<T> Method(){...}
}

You can also leave T unbound (without making the enclosing type generic), but you'll have to declare T after the method name, like so:

public FirstDelegate<T> Method<T>(){...}

Either way, at some point in time, T will be bound to a specific type. In this case, T will be bound when you create an instance of MyClass (i.e., new MyClass<int>), like you would do with a List<T>.

share|improve this answer
    
Then I have to make one handler for every type I want to return. Also I need to call the right handler for right returntype. – Evelie Feb 20 '14 at 12:57
    
@Evelie I've updated my answer. Lemme know if I missed any requirement. – dcastro Feb 20 '14 at 14:03
    
@Evelie Updated my answer again. – dcastro Feb 20 '14 at 14:07
    
even if I make 30 different caches with all my animals I only want one method to get the desired animal. Which in turn has to be generic if I dont want to cast. And my problem is that I cant store such a method no matter what I try. But thanks for your imput. I'm fairly certain now that it's not possible. I will mark you'r answer as the correct one. – Evelie Feb 20 '14 at 14:19
    
@Evelie I don't see the issue.. the approach I suggested only has one generic method, and there's no casting involved. – dcastro Feb 20 '14 at 14:21

You need to specify the type when declaring method :

static FirstDelegate<int> method;
share|improve this answer
    
That doesnt make it very generic. What happens when I want to return strings?.. – Evelie Feb 20 '14 at 12:47
1  
Then you declare a FirstDelegate<string> someMethod – Sean Feb 20 '14 at 12:48
    
In my specific scenario I got 30~ different returntypes making this approach kinda messy. But here is some points : D – Evelie Feb 20 '14 at 12:54
    
You are always going to have to mention a type at some point so that the compiler will know which method you wish to call. – Sean Feb 20 '14 at 13:00
    
I was hoping I could do something like delegate T FirstDelegate<T>(T i) where T : MyBaseClass and have all my objects inheriting from the baseclass. Basicly what Im tring to avoid is having to cast the objects fetched from the method everywhere. Seems like it's not possible tho.. – Evelie Feb 20 '14 at 13:04

If You have an instance of the object You want to get default value, You can use this:

public static T GetDefault<T>(T par)
    {
        return default(T);
    }

For example:

System.Drawing.Point p = new Point();
System.Drawing.Point defaultPoint = GetDefault(p);
share|improve this answer

My real goal is that I have a cache that can contain many different cache objects. And now I want a single method that is generic so I can get all objects through this one. I could make it return object or a baseclass, but then I still would have to cast each object everywhere its used.

There is no need to use delegates in this particular problem, because LINQ allows selecting objects by type from IEnumerable:

public class AnimalCache

    private readonly Animals as new HashSet(of Animal)

    public function Add(Animal as Animal) as AnimalCache
        Animals.Add(Animal)
        return me
    end function

    public function GetAnimals(of AnimalType as Animal) as IEnumerable(of AnimalType)
        return Animals.OfType(of AnimalType)
    end function
end class

Usage:

dim Cache = new AnimalCache().
    Add(new Cat).Add(new Dog).Add(new Cat)

dim CachedCats = Cache.GetAnimals(of Cat)
dim CachedDogs = Cache.GetAnimals(of Dog)

Note that if a Giraffe class is added into the class hierarchy, AnimalCache will still work:

public class Giraffe 
    inherits Animal

end class

dim Cache = new AnimalCache().
    Add(new Cat).Add(new Dog).Add(new Giraffe)

dim CachedGiraffes = Cache.GetAnimals(of Giraffe)
share|improve this answer

You can declare a Dictionary in the Cache class, use the Animal class type as the key and List<Animal> as the value.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

public class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Cache.AddCacheObj<Dog>(new Dog());
        Cache.AddCacheObj<Cat>(new Cat());

        var cat = Cache.GetCachedObj<Dog>();
        Console.WriteLine("Cat: {0}", cat);

        var dog = Cache.GetCachedObj<Cat>();
        Console.WriteLine("Dog: {0}", dog);     
    }
}

public static class Cache
{
    static Dictionary<Type, List<Animal>> dict = new Dictionary<Type, List<Animal>>();

    public static T GetCachedObj<T>() where T: Animal
    {
        List<Animal> list;
        if (dict.TryGetValue(typeof(T), out list))
        {
            return list.FirstOrDefault() as T;
        }
        return null;
    }

    public static void AddCacheObj<T>(T obj) where T: Animal
    {
        List<Animal> list;
        if (!dict.TryGetValue(typeof(T), out list))
        {
            list = new List<Animal>();
            dict[typeof(T)] = list;
        }
        list.Add(obj);
    }
}

public class Animal
{
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return "This is a " + this.GetType().ToString();
    }
}

public class Dog : Animal
{

}

public class Cat : Animal
{

}

The output:

Cat: This is a Dog
Dog: This is a Cat

You can check out the demo code here: https://dotnetfiddle.net/FYkCw7

share|improve this answer

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