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All I need to do is to execute a callback function when my current function execution ends.

function LoadData() 
{
    alert('The data has been loaded');
    //Call my callback with parameters. For example,
    //callback(loadedData , currentObject);
}

A consumer for this function should be like this:

object.LoadData(success);

function success(loadedData , currentObject) 
{
  //Todo: some action here 
}

How do I implement this?

share|improve this question
3  
object.LoadData(success) call must be after function success is defined. Otherwise, you will get an error telling you the function is not defined. – J. Bruni Dec 29 '11 at 13:41
up vote 351 down vote accepted

Actually, your code will pretty much work as is, just declare your callback as an argument and you can call it directly using the argument name.

The basics

function doSomething(callback) {
    // ...

    // Call the callback
    callback('stuff', 'goes', 'here');
}

function foo(a, b, c) {
    // I'm the callback
    alert(a + " " + b + " " + c);
}

doSomething(foo);

That will call doSomething, which will call foo, which will alert "stuff goes here".

Note that it's very important to pass the function reference (foo), rather than calling the function and passing its result (foo()). In your question, you do it properly, but it's just worth pointing out because it's a common error.

More advanced stuff

Sometimes you want to call the callback in a specific context — e.g., so the this value inside the callback has a specific value. You can easily do that with the JavaScript call function:

function Thing(name) {
    this.name = name;
}
Thing.prototype.doSomething = function(callback) {
    // Call our callback, but using our own instance as the context
    callback.call(this);
}

function foo() {
    alert(this.name);
}

var t = new Thing('Joe');
t.doSomething(foo);  // Alerts "Joe" via `foo`

You can also pass parameters:

function Thing(name) {
    this.name = name;
}
Thing.prototype.doSomething = function(callback, salutation) {
    // Call our callback, but using our own instance as the context
    callback.call(this, salutation);
}

function foo(salutation) {
    alert(salutation + " " + this.name);
}

var t = new Thing('Joe');
t.doSomething(foo, 'Hi');  // Alerts "Hi Joe" via `foo`

Sometimes it's useful to pass the arguments you want to give the callback as an array, rather than individually. You can use apply to do that:

function Thing(name) {
    this.name = name;
}
Thing.prototype.doSomething = function(callback) {
    // Call our callback, but using our own instance as the context
    callback.apply(this, ['Hi', 3, 2, 1]);
}

function foo(salutation, three, two, one) {
    alert(salutation + " " + this.name + " - " + three + " " + two + " " + one);
}

var t = new Thing('Joe');
t.doSomething(foo);  // Alerts "Hi Joe - 3 2 1" via `foo`
share|improve this answer
    
I know it will work if i don't have any parameters like the example you wrote but when i try to pass a function with parameters it's throwing an exception and telling me the function is not defined – Amgad Fahmi Feb 3 '10 at 9:29
    
@TiTaN: That's strange, there's nothing special about passing parameters into the callback. The callback reference you pass into your function is a function reference like any other, you can do all the normal things with it. – T.J. Crowder Feb 3 '10 at 9:32
3  
@everyone who answered: I think TiTaN's problem is that he doesn't know how to pass a function that requires arguments into a callback that doesn't pass any arguments. Think setTimeout(). The answer is to wrap the callback in a closure: doSomething(function(){foo('this','should','work')}) – slebetman Feb 3 '10 at 10:12
    
Someone point TiTaN to a thread (preferably on SO) discussing the issue above, my search-fu is weak today. – slebetman Feb 3 '10 at 10:13

It is good practice to make sure the callback is an actual function before attempting to execute it:

if (callback && typeof(callback) === "function") {

  callback();
}
share|improve this answer
12  
if(typeof callback == "function") will have the same result. – ThinkingMedia Oct 31 '13 at 15:00
10  
Yes, but if there is no callback, why bother typeof-ing it? That's the point of callback && ... – theonlygusti Dec 24 '14 at 15:41

My 2 cent. Same but different...

<script>
    dosomething("blaha", function(){
        alert("Yay just like jQuery callbacks!");
    });


    function dosomething(damsg, callback){
        alert(damsg);
        if(typeof callback == "function") 
        callback();
    }
</script>
share|improve this answer
2  
I love this snippet ,i was searching for this – Vimal Mar 13 '14 at 17:23
    
You're very welcome – Kilian Lindberg Mar 14 '14 at 9:40
function loadData(callback) {

    //execute other requirement

    if(callback && typeof callback == "function"){
        callback();
   }
}

loadData(function(){

   //execute callback

});
share|improve this answer
1  
Please consider editing your post to add more explanation about what your code does and why it will solve the problem. An answer that mostly just contains code (even if it's working) usually wont help the OP to understand their problem. However in this case, this is a very old question with highly regarded answers already posted, it might not be worth your while answering this when there are newer questions that could do with more attention. – SuperBiasedMan Sep 7 '15 at 10:29
function LoadData(callback) 
{
    alert('the data have been loaded');
    callback(loadedData, currentObject);
}
share|improve this answer
    
callback is undefined – Amgad Fahmi Feb 3 '10 at 9:33
   function callback(e){
      return e;
   }
    var MyClass = {
       method: function(args, callback){
          console.log(args);
          if(typeof callback == "function")
          callback();
       }    
    }

==============================================

MyClass.method("hello",function(){
    console.log("world !");
});

==============================================

Result is:

hello world !
share|improve this answer

Try:

function LoadData (callback)
{
    // ... Process whatever data
    callback (loadedData, currentObject);
}

Functions are first class in JavaScript; you can just pass them around.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not working keep telling me the callback is undefined – Amgad Fahmi Feb 3 '10 at 9:32

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