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I've been trying to 'further' my one-lining of stuff, and stumbled upon this bit. Simply using a while would suffice if I didn't forbid myself from using multiple lines.

So the sample problem I'm trying to solve is as follows (found it on one of those coding sites: codercharts, codeeval etc.):

The problem is as follows: choose a number, reverse its digits and add it to the original. If the sum is not a palindrome (which means, it is not the same number from left to right and right to left), repeat this procedure.

Super simple, right? A simple while would suffice, but I don't really know how to generate numbers until a certain condition is met. I've checked out itertools.takeWhile and itertools.dropWhile, but those work with existing lists, which I would still have to generate.

I tried out generators, which work, but I don't know how to compress those in a single line.

Argh, in Haskell creating an infinite list and then using takeWhile would work, but in Python I'm stuck. Any pointers to the right direction would be greatly appreciated.

Edit: To be more concise, I'm trying to do this on a single line (minus imports, of course).

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closed as off-topic by thefourtheye, Jackie Xu, Martijn Pieters, Zeta, amalloy Feb 21 '14 at 2:05

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5  
Is this a python question or a Haskell question? And what is the question, exactly? –  Eric Feb 20 '14 at 14:41
2  
"Argh, in Haskell creating an infinite list and then using takeWhile would work, but in Python I'm stuck" - I think she wants Python! –  Dayan Feb 20 '14 at 14:45
    
Maybe a recursive lambda function? –  Pablo Francisco Pérez Hidalgo Feb 20 '14 at 14:47
3  
@JackieXu Shouldn't this belong in codegolf.stackexchange.com with all the stringent conditions? –  thefourtheye Feb 20 '14 at 14:57
5  
This question appears to be off-topic because it belongs in codegolf.stackexchange.com –  thefourtheye Feb 20 '14 at 15:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'd begin by writing this in a recursive fashion:

def frob(x):
    if str(x) == str(x)[::-1]: 
        return x
    else:
        return frob(x + int(str(x)[::-1]))

print frob(29)

Then, since a lambda can't refer to itself by name, I would remove the explicit recursion and require the user to pass the function to itself as a parameter.

def frob(f, x):
    if str(x) == str(x)[::-1]: 
        return x
    else:
        return f(f, x + int(str(x)[::-1]))

print frob(frob, 29)

This allows you to write frob as a one-liner.

def frob(f, x):
    return x if str(x) == str(x)[::-1] else f(f, x + int(str(x)[::-1]))

print frob(frob, 29)

Which can then be made into a lambda function.

frob = lambda f, x: x if str(x) == str(x)[::-1] else f(f, x + int(str(x)[::-1]))

print frob(frob, 29)

You can use a fixed point combinator to modify the function's signature, so that it no longer requires you to pass itself in explicitly.

frob = (lambda f: lambda x: f(f,x))(lambda f, x: x if str(x) == str(x)[::-1] else f(f, x + int(str(x)[::-1])))
print frob(29)

At this point, you no longer need the assignment at all, and can call the lambda in one line.

print (lambda f: lambda x: f(f,x))(lambda f, x: x if str(x) == str(x)[::-1] else f(f, x + int(str(x)[::-1])))(29)

Edit: I just noticed I misread the original problem statement - it's necessary to add the number to its reverse at least once, even if it's originally a palindrome. In that case, we can still use the same function, but we'll have to wrap it in something that executes that first step.

def troz(x):
    return frob(x + int(str(x)[::-1]))

Which reduces to:

print (lambda x: (lambda f: lambda x: f(f,x))(lambda f, x: x if str(x) == str(x)[::-1] else f(f, x + int(str(x)[::-1])))(x + int(str(x)[::-1])))(29)
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Holy. Snap. This is beautiful. I've never worked with fixed point combinators, but now I'm definitely interested! –  Jackie Xu Feb 20 '14 at 15:23
    
Another approach would be to use accumulate, e.g. next(dropwhile(lambda x: str(x) != str(x)[::-1], accumulate(repeat(z+int(str(z)[::-1])), lambda x,_: x+int(str(x)[::-1])))). But there's no point to it, as it's greatly inferior to a simple loop. –  DSM Feb 20 '14 at 15:27
    
"Then, since a lambda can't refer to itself by name" I think this works (please correct me if I am wrong): f = lambda x: 1+f(x). By definition it stops being a lambda function but you can write it in one line. –  Pablo Francisco Pérez Hidalgo Feb 20 '14 at 18:16
1  
You're right about that. I guess I should qualify it as, "a lambda that hasn't been assigned to anything can't refer to itself by name" –  Kevin Feb 20 '14 at 18:18

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