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I would like to know if /usr/bin/time supports more precisions digits than 2? i.e. when I run:

/usr/bin/time -f %U ls

it gives me : 0.00, is there any way to increase the digits ?

Secondly, although time refers to /usr/bin/time in my system, but their outputs are different, why is that ? i.e.

/usr/bin/time -f %U ls
0.00user 0.00system 0:00.03elapsed 23%CPU (0avgtext+0avgdata 3104maxresident)k
0inputs+0outputs (0major+259minor)pagefaults 0swaps

BUT

$time ls
real    0m0.023s
user    0m0.008s
sys     0m0.008s

while I have:

$which time
/usr/bin/time
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is unfortunately no chance to increase the precision. Sorry for the short answer, but I will say a few words to the second question.

While you have the program time installed at /usr/bin/time (which shows this), there is also a bash builtin with the same name. bash will use a builtin in favour of a binary unless you specify the whole path to the binary.

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thanks for the reply, and what about the second question? –  Amir Feb 20 at 14:52
1  
/usr/bin/time is a binary, but your shell also has the time builtin (and uses it in favour of the binary unless you specify the full path to binary) I'm not sure why the binary produces that output.. I'm investigating –  hek2mgl Feb 20 at 14:54
    
@Amir There is not much to say. The binary just has a lower precision than the bash builtin, you can't do much, except of using the builtin. I wasn't aware of this before you've asked here :) +1 for the question.. –  hek2mgl Feb 20 at 14:59
    
ok then :( thanks @hek2mgl –  Amir Feb 20 at 15:00
    
btw, do you know why I can NOT redirect the output of $time to a file ? –  Amir Feb 20 at 15:20

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