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I have a setup like this:

<controller>
   <directive>

in my controller that has a function that returns an html string. How can I get my directive to render this by accessing the controllers scope?

Or maybe I should just put the controller in the directive?

app.controller('controller', ['$scope', 'DataService', function ($scope, DataService) {

    $scope.parseJson = function () {
      //returns the html
    };

}]);

directive

app.directive('Output', function () {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
    replace: true,
    template: '<need html from controller>',
    link: function(scope, element, attr) {

        //render
        //scope.parseJson();
    }
  };
});
share|improve this question
    
You ought to separate the function or even put it in its own service/factory that both controller and directive can use. –  Manny D Feb 20 '14 at 15:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should use the isolated scope: '&' option

app.directive('output', ['$sce', function ($sce) {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
    replace: true,
    template: "<div ng-bind-html='parsed'></div>",
    scope:{
      output: "&"
    },
    link: function(scope){
      scope.parsed = $sce.trustAsHtml(scope.output());
    }
  };
}]);

Template:

<div output="parseJson()"></div>
share|improve this answer
    
thanks sir, for your time! –  FutuToad Feb 20 '14 at 17:22
    
thanks, why do you use parseJson() in the directive? –  FutuToad Feb 24 '14 at 11:29
1  
@FutuToad The reason is that the directive shouldn't be tight coupled with the controller or outer scope. –  Ilan Frumer Feb 24 '14 at 11:43
    
ok, I think I'm getting it, I'm actually now thinking of just using the service directly in the directive, a good idea? –  FutuToad Feb 24 '14 at 12:15
1  
something like this: elm.text(parsed) –  Ilan Frumer Feb 26 '14 at 15:04

The directive and the controller should be sharing the scope already. Don't bother using a template for the directive, just get the HTML string in you linking function (you already have the method call in there) and modify the element directly using element.html(). Take a look at the element docs for more info.

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It will if you use the $compile service. Just inject it into the directive. After you call element.html(htmlString), you can then call $compile(element[0])(scope) and you'll be set. –  bmceldowney Feb 20 '14 at 16:00
    
im having a hard time picking the answer, I like your approach though –  FutuToad Feb 24 '14 at 12:21
    
I vote for Ilan's approach. It's cleaner. –  bmceldowney Feb 24 '14 at 19:43
app.directive('Output', function ($compile) {
      return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: function(scope, element, attr) {
            var templateString = scope.parseJson();
            var compiledTemplate = $compile(templateString)(scope);
            compiledTemplate.appendTo("TheElementYouWishtoAppendYourDirectiveTo");
        }
      };
    });
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, however for my html string passed to $compile(templateString)(scope); results in the error TypeError: object is not a function at Object.fn –  FutuToad Feb 26 '14 at 10:46
    
Are you injecting $compile into the directive? –  RonnieTroj Feb 26 '14 at 10:51
    
yeah: mymodule.directive('output', ['$sce', function ($sce,$compile) { –  FutuToad Feb 26 '14 at 10:56
    
running $compile in the console outputs: Constructor {}, running $compile() gives the error I mentioned –  FutuToad Feb 26 '14 at 10:59

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